3

When writing code for an answer where I want someone using my solution to fill in the blank, what is the best practice for indicating that they need to provide that value/variable?

Example 1: Use an example value

from matplotlib.pyplot import *
import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame.from_csv('../170914/170914b.csv')

column_name = '5'
plot(10**(df[column_name]/10))
xlabel('Wavelength (nm)')
ylabel('Power density (mW/nm')
savefig('../170914/170914ba.png')

Pros:

  • This is closest to the way I prototype my code, and is very fast.

Cons:

  • I fear that the user may copy-paste the code and use as-is. This would overwrite '../170914/170914ba.png'.

Example 2: Include a comment in addition to an example value

from matplotlib.pyplot import *
import pandas as pd

# Change the files here
file_source = '../170914/170914b.csv'
file_destination = '../170914/170914ba.png'

df = pd.DataFrame.from_csv(file_source)

column_name = '5'
plot(10**(df[column_name]/10))
xlabel('Wavelength (nm)')
ylabel('Power density (mW/nm')
savefig(file_destination)

Pros:

  • Perhaps uses best practices, like DRY.
  • Requires a bit more refactoring before publishing.

Cons:

  • Again, the user may not notice that they should change the code from the comments alone.

Example 3: Don't define the variables ahead of time

from matplotlib.pyplot import *
import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame.from_csv(file_source)

column_name = '5'
plot(10**(df[column_name]/10))
xlabel('Wavelength (nm)')
ylabel('Power density (mW/nm')
savefig(file_destination)

Pros:

  • This approach forces users to fill in the names, since it won't run without raising errors.

Cons:

  • It may be frustrating for new users who see a bunch of errors when they copy-paste the code.
  • Doesn't work out-of-the-box.

Example 4: Templating

from matplotlib.pyplot import *
import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame.from_csv({{ file_source }})

column_name = '5'
plot(10**(df[column_name]/10))
xlabel('Wavelength (nm)')
ylabel('Power density (mW/nm')
savefig({{ file_destination }})

Pros:

  • Familiar for those who use templating engines like Django or Liquid

Cons:

  • Doesn't seem to be the standard for sharing code like this.
  • Looks ugly
  • 1
    I you want the answer to be accepted, make it as copy/paste ready for the OP as possible :p – user000001 Sep 22 '17 at 17:32
  • fill it in for them. – Kevin B Sep 22 '17 at 18:00
  • I like using df = pd.DataFrame.from_csv('your_csv_file_name_here') – NathanOliver Sep 22 '17 at 18:22
8

In essence, your answer must be complete in context to the OP's question. Your code should be mostly complete and should be simple enough to run from the perspective of either the OP or the onlooker, but you don't have to provide anything further than that; any files or any external artifacts that were mocked out in the question are assumed to be used.

I want to call attention to this:

I fear that the user may copy-paste the code and use as-is.

This already happens. More than you may realize. That shouldn't hinder your ability to answer the question, though; if someone else decides to just plop your code directly into their codebase without vetting it, or at least figuring out if it works for their uses, then that's more on them than you. You can't control if someone copies your code wantonly into their codebase. You can ensure that it's as accurate as it needs to be in the context of the OP's problem, though.

1

An option I see often is the use a file/variable name that itself tells the user to change the value:

from matplotlib.pyplot import *
import pandas as pd

file_source = '../change-path-to/your-file.csv'
file_destination = '../change-path-to/your-file.png'

df = pd.DataFrame.from_csv(file_source)

column_name = '5'
plot(10**(df[column_name]/10))
xlabel('Wavelength (nm)')
ylabel('Power density (mW/nm')
savefig(file_destination)

But honestly, any of your examples are an acceptable way to do it. In particular,

Doesn't work out-of-the-box

isn't a good reason to not use an option because it'd be impossible for your code to do so (unless the OP actually provided the paths to the files). And if the user isn't reading the code before using it then it doesn't matter what kind of indication you use. I think each method will work for anyone who's paying attention.

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