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So I came across a question with an accepted answer. The author and OP commented on the accepted answer and included links in their comments. The links are very relevant to anyone who finds this question and it's answer. However, the links in the comments are dead.

I'd have liked to comment with the updated links, but I don't have enough rep to do so. My solution was to add an answer with the correct links, and I mentioned that the link is meant as a replacement for the dead links in the comments on the accepted answer.

Within a blink of an eye I got 2 comments stating that I shouldn't have added the answer. And it got deleted. See below.

So I get that adding another answer wasn't ideal, but what should I have done instead? Nothing? I could have just walked away from the dead links and let others figure it out for themselves, but really, no?

I figured I could edit the accepted answer, but I fear that edit would get the same treatment?

Any insights would be much appreciated. ("what did I do wrong? - I'd like to contribute!")

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    Just put it on your todo list but work to 50 rep first so you can comment anywhere. Leaving non-answers can lead to post bans making it even harder to reach those 50 rep. – rene Sep 21 '17 at 15:26
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    I guess I should do that anyway, regardless of this question. I personally don't care much about how much rep I have, I'd just like to contribute when I can. Don't get me wrong, I do get why the rep system is in place. Problem is... 'non-answer' is a bit vague to me in this case. What should I have done instead... – Wil Koetsier Sep 21 '17 at 15:59
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    You either write a much better, up-to-date, different take, extra tricks, etc and then include the working links in your much better answer. Or you do nothing if you feel your only option is to write a comment in the answer box, because that is not where the answers are for. If you really feel it needs to be fixed quickly you can hop into a chatroom and ask for a 2K-er to make the edit. Or if you don't mind to have edits rejected you could try to suggest an edit to rectify the faulty links but make sure to leave an extensive edit comment to explain to the reviewers why you changed the links. – rene Sep 21 '17 at 16:05
  • Thanks for your clear explanation rene. Even with an extensive edit comment, isn't that considered rude towards the original poster of the answer? Either way, like I say in comment below, I sense I should just leave it (or wait until I have enough rep). – Wil Koetsier Sep 21 '17 at 16:14
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    If the links really add value and preserve quality of the answer and you fix anything else that needs possible fixing I don't see how that can be considered rude. Worst case the OP rejects/rollbacks your edit. If you do what you can to make improving edits to the best of your abilities no one will object to that, and those that do will probably be corrected by the majority of the community. You'll upset someone sooner or later, better get used / be prepared for that ... we've all been there, don't worry about that, just focus on post quality. The content counts. – rene Sep 21 '17 at 16:20
  • Whenever you apologize for abusing SO answers because "I haven't got enough rep", God kills a kitten.js. Please, won't someone think of the kitties! – Nathan Tuggy Sep 23 '17 at 8:05
  • (As the saying goes, don't be sorry, just don't do it again. Apologizing in advance for something you already know is [considered] wrong but are determined to do anyway only adds insult to injury.) – Nathan Tuggy Sep 23 '17 at 8:05
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Flag the comments as obsolete. They aren't part of anything searchable, so their worth is officially zero.

We can't edit comments anyway.

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    Well... I'd rather not flag them as obsolete, because they're still relevant, only the provided links are broken. But like you say, we can't edit them. – Wil Koetsier Sep 21 '17 at 15:54
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    @WilKoetsier: If they really wanted them to be preserved, they'd have put them in the answer. We really can't touch comments, and my strong opinion is that they're temporal anyway. I get that they may have held some promise at some point in time, but that promise faded when those links went dark. – Makoto Sep 21 '17 at 15:56
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    But the text of the broken links could lead someone to the new location of the information, as apparently happened with OP. Don't you think that value could be lost if the comments are deleted? – user000001 Sep 21 '17 at 15:57
  • @user000001: No. Again, comments aren't indexed or searchable. – Makoto Sep 21 '17 at 15:58
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    I feel preserving the links really adds to the accepted answer. I'd poke the guy who answered to add it to the question, but I can't. I'm totally unsure if it's accepted that I would edit the links into the answer. I could just leave it, others could use the text and broken links to deduce where the information is now. But I thought I'd help out here. I'm sensing that even though I'd like to help, in this case, I can't and I should just leave it. – Wil Koetsier Sep 21 '17 at 16:07
  • It sounds like they should be added to the answer. You have the power to suggest that edit; don't wait for the OP. – ale Sep 21 '17 at 16:58
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    I have suggested an edit on the accepted answer, as you and @rene (comments to my question here) have suggested. I'll leave the comments as is (but could flag them obsolete should my edit be accepted). Stepping out (having learnt things from this dicussion) and looking at my question again, I'll accept Makoto's answer. I don't fully agree that comments are worth zero and are temporal, but I do agree that relevant information is better off in an answer than in comments. In my specific case, imo, by adding the info to the answer, the comments become obsolete. – Wil Koetsier Sep 21 '17 at 18:13
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    Sure, comments aren't indexed or searchable, but OP nevertheless found them, because the content of the question and answer are indexed and searchable. OP's whole dilemma here is the links DID provide important information, apparently with enough context to figure out the up-to-date URLs (which is actually pretty common). – Kyle Strand Sep 22 '17 at 18:26
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You state that the contents of the comments on the post (answer) are:

...very relevant to anyone who finds this question and it's answer.

Edit the comments into the post

In that case, you should edit the comments into the post. When doing so, include an edit summary that says something like "Move relevant comments by OP into the [question/answer]." This should be done any time comments contain information which is "very relevant" to the post. Comments are considered temporary (even though they often stay around permanently), as has already been mentioned, are not considered for searches.

At the same time, you can update the links to archives of the relevant pages. In that case, I'd use an edit summary like: "Move relevant comments by OP into the [question/answer], with dead links updated to archives."

Finding archives

Archive.org

My go-to method for finding archives is to go to the dead link and use a bookmarklet which will cause archive.org to show any archives for the page which is the current URL:

javascript:void(window.open('https://web.archive.org/web/*/'+location.href))
Mementos

You can also search multiple archive sites by looking for Mementos:

javascript:void(window.open('http://www.webarchive.org.uk/mementos/search/'+encodeURIComponent(location.href)+'?referrer='+encodeURIComponent(document.referrer)))
Google's cache

While it's not appropriate as an actual archive link, for relatively recently deleted data, you can look in Google's cache:

javascript:void(window.open('http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:'+location.href.replace(/https?:\/\//,'')))

Seeing what's in Google's cache can sometimes help with finding the information elsewhere when you don't know what the contents of the page were. For those with <10k reputation, it can also be used to see some questions in the state they were prior to deletion, when the question does not have an archive.org based archive.

After edit approved, flag comment(s) as "no longer needed"

Once the edit placing the information from the comment has been actually applied into the post (i.e. your edit is approved), you can flag the comment as "no longer needed".

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