-13

My answer to this question from 2013 is accepted and currently has a score of 17. Yet the question itself is closed as "too broad".

Based on the acceptance and the comments left by the OP, it seems like the answer definitely solved their problem. Based on the subsequent upvotes, it seems likely that it has also helped several others with the same problem. This seems like a pretty clear indicator that the question is, in fact, evidently answerable.

(FWIW, the question is currently the top Google result for "ISAAC cipher in PHP" or just "ISAAC PHP". It's also linked from the official ISAAC home page.)

Nor do I see anything to suggest that the question would attract an excessive number of different partial answers; certainly, this has not happened during the 1.5 years after the question was asked and before it was closed.

Yet my several attempts over the years to get the question reopened have been unsuccessful. The first two were unanimously declined by reviewers. The latest one, after I decided to add an explanatory comment describing why I believed the question should be reopened, managed to gain one additional reopen vote before it, too, was declined by three other reviewers.

So, rather than keep repeatedly banging my head against that particular wall, I figured I should take the issue to meta here and ask for a broader community opinion:

Is this really a question that should remain closed? And if so, why?

Of course, the fact that the question is closed does not really personally inconvenience me in any way, since my answer is still there and steadily accumulating upvotes. But it still feels awkward, not to mention potentially unfair towards anyone who might some day wish to contribute an alternative answer. Also, I feel like there's clearly some sort of a disconnect between my view of what makes an acceptable SO question and that of the reviewers, and I'd like to figure out if I should somehow adjust my perspective here or just chalk it up to careless reviewers being careless.

(Also, for the sake of full disclosure, let me note that I'm also hoping that, by bringing up this matter here, the "meta effect" will work for me and provide the extra votes needed to actually get the question reopened.)

  • 9
    I really wish that Meta weren't unleashed upon the main site like a pack of wolves onto an unsuspecting elk. – Makoto Sep 20 '17 at 22:19
  • 9
    Trying to "channel" the meta effect RARELY ends well... props for being straightforward about it though :/... And, how is "I want to do X, I have tried NOTHING, have no data, no nothing, just the question for you guys to solve" anything BUT broad? – Patrice Sep 20 '17 at 22:19
  • 1
    @Yannis oh no I get you weren't serious, just not sure at which part of my comment you were addressing it. Best of luck to OP here in using the meta effect to their advantage... I would disagree that this needs reopening though, to me it's clearly the definition of too broad :/... – Patrice Sep 20 '17 at 22:24
  • 2
    @Patrice It's a shame the OP hasn't been around since Oct 2013. If they were still active, we could at least try asking them to include their failed attempts at solving this. That would be enough to get the question re-opened, imho. – yannis Sep 20 '17 at 22:28
  • 1
    @Patrice: You mean like "How can I undo a git commit?", the classic example of a way too broad question? :) Seriously, IMO, "How can I do X?" is not too broad if it's clear what X is and if how to it do can be reasonably described in an SO answer. It might be off-topic for other reasons, but not because of broadness. – Ilmari Karonen Sep 20 '17 at 22:29
  • 4
    @IlmariKaronen That's seems to be your opinion, not the majority. After trying twice to get it reopened and failing, you can probably guess your opinion is different than the majority. Oh and I need to add the mandatory "don't use 4 year old questions as a barometer for that's on topic nowadays". Also... if it's off-topic for OTHER reasons, what's the benefit in reopening it.... just to close it again with a different close reason? – Patrice Sep 20 '17 at 22:31
  • 1
    @yannis: Honestly, if the OP added their failed attempts to the question now, I'd rather edit them out again. An example of an unsuccessful attempt (besides showing that the OP is serious about the question) is mainly helpful if the task consists of multiple parts and it's not clear which one the OP is having trouble with. Adding one after the question has already been fully answered just creates useless clutter. – Ilmari Karonen Sep 20 '17 at 22:33
  • 6
    There is some horse-shoe around that keep poking this question over and over again. It has been through review 4 times already over the past 3 years, everybody keeps agreeing that it needs to stay close. Are you the shoe? Can you, like, stop trying? Regardless, somebody needs to stop trying. They just need to post the Right Question and the Right Answer.. – Hans Passant Sep 20 '17 at 22:34
  • 1
    @Patrice: That's why I brought the issue to meta, so that we could have a proper discussion about it. Frankly, based on some of these comments, I'm indeed curious to see if the influx of low-quality questions has succeeded in shifting the scope of SO so far towards "debug my code for me" that simple questions asking for a canonical solution to a problem (like the git question I linked to in my earlier comment, or the one being discussed here) are no longer considered on-topic unless they include a gratuitous dump of broken code. – Ilmari Karonen Sep 20 '17 at 22:40
  • 1
    @HansPassant: Yes, as I mentioned above, I voted to reopen the question once just after it was closed in 2014, and again in August this year. After that failed, I figured I'd try once more, this time with a comment explaining why I felt it should be reopened. Since that failed too, I decided to bring the issue here. I certainly have no intention of casting any further reopen votes on the question since, rightly or not, it's clearly not productive. – Ilmari Karonen Sep 20 '17 at 22:45
  • 4
    That might backfire @IlmariKaronen. There's no shortage of questions that claim prior effort, without ever actually showing any. People tend to react negatively to that. – yannis Sep 20 '17 at 23:08
  • 3
    Attempts aren't going to make how-to questions on-topic, the only thing attempts will do to how-to questions is turn them into debugging style questions, in which case the question very well may be on-topic (if it were to include an MCVE and a clear problem statement), but then the answer wouldn't be relevant. – user4639281 Sep 21 '17 at 0:10
  • 3
    I'm curious what the advantage of re-opening is? As far as I am aware of the only "disadvantage" of a closed question is that it cannot receive new answers stackoverflow.com/help/closed-questions Does the question really need more answers? – Jonathan Sep 21 '17 at 3:01
  • 10
    After 3 failed attempts to reopen, isn't it fairly clear that the majority would prefer it stay closed? I'm also curious about what re-opening is going to accomplish. – ivarni Sep 21 '17 at 6:42
  • 9
    @IlmariKaronen "Too Broad" here doesn't mean "Too Broad to possibly be answered", it means it's too broad for the self-imposed scope of Stack Overflow. Almost no question about programming is too broad to answer, but many questions are too broad to be a good fit for this site, which focuses on specific questions with specific, objective answers. – TylerH Sep 21 '17 at 15:03
18

Would a question like this stand up to the standards that we apply to it today? I'm going to say "no", and here's why.

I need to communicate in PHP with a client that is using the ISAAC stream cipher. As far as I can tell, none of the crypto libraries available for PHP implement this cipher. How could one implement the ISAAC cipher in a PHP application?

The above reads like a, "how do I do X and will you do it for me?"-type question. I don't detract from the fact that your answer actually said, "here's how you do it", but in general we don't want those kinds of questions around, since it gives users incentive or prior art to keep asking them.

This should definitely stay closed, but it should definitely not be deleted, because the answer is still valuable to others. If it came back up for review, it'd have to be closed down because the premise of the question is just too broad by our standards.

  • 8
    There's nothing inherently wrong with "how do I do X and will you do it for me?"-type questions, it really depends on what the question is asking for. – user247702 Sep 20 '17 at 22:49
  • 1
    @Stijn: Find a question that has been asked in the last three years that follows the same pattern and is both open and not downvoted. – Makoto Sep 20 '17 at 22:51
  • 2
    @Makato See What's the appropriate new/current close reason for “How do I do X?”, George's answer has some examples. – user247702 Sep 20 '17 at 22:54
  • 7
    All three examples there were asked in 2008 @Stijn. I don't necessarily disagree with you, but Makoto does have a point: these questions don't survive long anymore. – yannis Sep 20 '17 at 23:10
  • 8
    If true, this seems kind of sad to me. In our efforts to discourage lazy help vampires from posting "gimme teh codez" questions, it seems as if we've managed to also cut off exactly those simple and clearly written "How do I solve this specific task?" questions that are the most useful for people who aren't help vampires and actually want to Google for a solution first. And yet we're getting more lazy over-localized debugging questions than ever. The baby may be gone, but we're still drowning in the bathwater. :( – Ilmari Karonen Sep 20 '17 at 23:23
  • 4
    @yannis The fact that these questions don't survive is unfortunate as they tend to be the most helpful. The problem is they have such a bad rap due to extremely lazy programmers who don't search. – psubsee2003 Sep 20 '17 at 23:25
  • 10
    How-to questions are by no means inherently off-topic, and there are how-to questions asked all the time that are not too broad, get answered, and live happily onward. There are also how-to questions that are not too broad but are closed erroneously because some people think we only accept debugging questions. Finally there are how-to questions that are just plain too broad, like the one in question here. The problem with it is that what it is asking for is just too broad of a topic for Stack Overflow plain and simple. – user4639281 Sep 20 '17 at 23:47
  • 1
    @TinyGiant i don't know enough about the topic to be able to say it is or isn't too broad, but I often see such claims on meta without explanation. Since the question here claims it isn't, could you provide a better explanation as to why? The reason I ask is the answer doesn't seems very simple – psubsee2003 Sep 20 '17 at 23:50
  • 1
    @psubsee2003: Try an approach from the opposite angle. What makes this question narrow and answerable? Are they asking for help with one simple part of their app? – Makoto Sep 20 '17 at 23:52
  • 3
    @TinyGiant: I'd be genuinely interested in hearing why you consider this particular task to be too broad. To me, "implement ISAAC in PHP" seems perfectly reasonably scoped. Yes, the actual implementation could be written in various ways, but that's true of almost any "how to" question. It's a rare programming problem indeed that can only be solved in exactly one way. Looking at recently popular "how to" questions on SO like this or this, I don't see anyone complaining about there being multiple possible answers. – Ilmari Karonen Sep 21 '17 at 0:32
  • 2
    @Makoto: As far as I can tell, yes they are. The one simple part just happens to be porting a stream cipher to PHP rather than, say, reading a file in C++ or styling half a character with CSS. – Ilmari Karonen Sep 21 '17 at 1:00
  • 8
    "What makes this question narrow and answerable?" Um, someone answered it with a reasonable-length answer, and that answer has been positively reviewed by the community over many years. I agree that my first impression of that question in a review queue would be that it is too broad, but is it actually? I don't know. That's the only reason it might possibly be off-topic, so this is a really important question. – Cody Gray Sep 21 '17 at 10:48
  • 3
    @CodyGray: I don't deny that the answer is the question's saving grace, but that doesn't mean that it should be reopened. If it were, today you may get a whole bunch of, "Here, try this code"-type questions without explanation or detail. – Makoto Sep 21 '17 at 14:54
  • 1
    @IlmariKaronen: The "too broad" text was changed quite some time ago. – Makoto Sep 21 '17 at 17:47
  • 2
    @IlmariKaronen Everyone has different opinions on where the line is for Too Broad, I have stated that my opinion of the line is somewhere before that question, in your opinion it is not. The majority of the response here and in review is saying that the question is too broad. "How to sort an array" in any language would be too broad (in my opinion) as there is no limit to how the array can be sorted. – user4639281 Sep 21 '17 at 18:21
8

Is this question really too broad? And if so, how did I manage to answer it anyway?

I will specifically answer the title because I believe it points out a serious misconception about the too broad close reason...

Too broad doesn't meant that it cannot have an answer, but the complete opposite, it has too many answers. Being able to answer a too broad question doesn't automatically makes it not-too broad. The too broad reason is meant to be used when you don't have any criteria to discard possible answers, instead it accepts any answer. The other use is for those that close reason is for that whatever answer you can provide it would be too long to cover just the specific case. That you were able to publish a self contained library kind of proves this.

I think that publishing the library on Github is enough. There's no need to keep the question open. In fact, onces your module is sufficiently popular we could just remove the question.

  • Perhaps I should've phrased my title better, then. What I meant to ask is how did I manage to definitively answer the "too broad" question. I assume you're saying that this question isn't too broad because it "accepts any answer" (since it pretty clearly doesn't), but because a good answer would have to be too long. If that's the case, I guess a lot of my top voted answers are on "too broad" questions, since most of them are of comparable length. – Ilmari Karonen Sep 21 '17 at 14:28
4

How-to questions here exist on a spectrum of broadness, somewhere between "How do I add two numbers together"* and "How do I make a website like Facebook."* There's clearly a lot of gray area between, and not everyone agrees on exactly where the line is where a question becomes too broad, but I think everyone agrees that there is a line. Judging by the feedback here, and the outcome of your previous attempts to get that question reopened, it seems that a majority of the community disagrees with you about where it is.

In my opinion, the thing that makes the question too broad, even after your edits, is that it doesn't really ask any specific question about how to implement the ISAAC cipher, it just asks for someone to do it. The fact that you did it is very cool, but it doesn't change the fact the question is basically "will someone write a program for me" and your answer is "here you go."

The text that you added from the OP's comment is basically just a secondary debugging question without an MCVE.

*obviously by using jQuery

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .