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I just reviewed a late answer and left a constructive comment for the user. I was then presented with this response:

This was only a test, designed to make sure you were paying attention. You passed. This answer has already been removed, but thanks for considering leaving feedback for its author.

I already am volunteering my time to help out other users. This method of "checking" makes me bear all of the cost, and negatively reinforces my desire to help and leave insightful comments.

The system reminds me a lot of an operant conditioning experiment. Most of the time, nothing happens. Sometimes, randomly, my time is wasted, and I am thus negatively reinforced that my time & insights could be wasted. Due to the randomness, this is the most effective type of operant conditioning to make me not want to use the review queue (and post on meta instead ;-) )

Possible solutions:

  • Not using this system at all? If you don't assume best intentions, then what's the point? People can game this system just like any other. Having multiple reviewers and a minimum reputation already guards against this.
  • Telling the reviewer ahead of time that it's a fake question.
  • Stopping the test as soon as the correct answer is picked (before having to write stuff)

marked as duplicate by gnat, Michael Gaskill, Robert Longson, Stephen Rauch, Code Lღver Sep 13 '17 at 21:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    Audits aren't fakes but picked by the system from real questions. – user0042 Sep 13 '17 at 18:35
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    since you added the review audit tag, you know what they are called, so presumably you did your research to understand why audits were implemented, correct? – psubsee2003 Sep 13 '17 at 18:37
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    This is interesting. Usually people don't show up here to complain about review audits that they passed. – Don't Panic Sep 13 '17 at 18:37
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    We can't assume good intent because we have data that shows people will just farm badges if we let them. SO is not going to get rid of review audits. They server a very real purpose and without them site quality would suffer. – NathanOliver Sep 13 '17 at 18:40
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    i mean, why have a review system at all – Kevin B Sep 13 '17 at 18:40
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    "Having multiple reviewers and a minimum reputation already guards against this." If only that was true ... but it's really not. "Telling the reviewer ahead of time that it's a fake question." would kind of defeat the purpose of a test designed to make sure you're paying attention, don't you think? – Keiwan Sep 13 '17 at 18:41
  • @psubsee2003: <passive aggressively> presumably – AnilRedshift Sep 13 '17 at 18:45
  • @NathanOliver: Is there a way to have audits that benefit the reviewer, instead of detract from? That is my main frustration. Due to bad actors, I pay a cost for reviewing. That cost is random and due to psychology makes me less want to leave well-thought out comments because of the random chance it's thrown away – AnilRedshift Sep 13 '17 at 18:48
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    See my answer to "Is there any hard evidence that audits improve review quality?" for a detailed description of why audits are necessary. Without them, people will not only approve spam, vandalism, and trolling, they even vote them up just to get badges. Putting even the tiniest roadblock in their way prevents the vast majority of this. On balance, it's worth the inconvenience, but that's not to say that the process is perfect and couldn't be improved. – Brad Larson Sep 13 '17 at 18:55
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    Programmers always assume a bad intention. – TGrif Sep 13 '17 at 18:56
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    @AnilRedshift I'm not sure you could get audits like that in a system that pulls from current "known good" and "known bad" content to be used as a review. One thing you can always do is go the post outside the review. That will let you know if you are dealing with an audit and if so you don't need to leave a comment. – NathanOliver Sep 13 '17 at 18:59
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    Explained quite well on the global meta site. – Cody Gray Sep 13 '17 at 19:04
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    @TGrif I certainly do ,and on SO, I'm rarely disappointed :) – Martin James Sep 13 '17 at 19:17
  • I have a 'Be suspicious' policy. – Martin James Sep 13 '17 at 19:17
  • @Martin James You know, most of the time, nothing happens. – TGrif Sep 13 '17 at 19:28
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Not using this system at all? If you don't assume best intentions, then what's the point?

The point is to have a usable system that isn't fraught with abuse, resulting in the review queues being of net harm to the site, rather than them being helpful.

People can game this system just like any other. Having multiple reviewers and a minimum reputation already guards against this.

It demonstrably does not, as evidenced by the enormous amount of rampant abuse that dominated these systems before the audits were put in place. Back then the vast majority of reviewers were bad actors, meaning that what little good work good reviewers tried to do was worthless, as they'd always be overruled by the bad actors, making the multiple reviewers act against the interests of the site, rather than helping. So many of the bad actors had such a high rep that the rep requirements simply didn't help.

Telling the reviewer ahead of time that it's a fake question.

This defeats the entire purpose. If it did this then it really would be wasting everyone's time, as it wouldn't succeed in dealing with bad actors.

Stopping the test as soon as the correct answer is picked (before having to write stuff)

It does to this, in places where it's possible to do so.

Sometimes, randomly, my time is wasted

Your time isn't being wasted. That time is spent ensuring that the review queues aren't being abused. It's valuable time spent on your behalf ensuring that you're a good actor, and ensuring that other bad actors don't use the site. That effort is well worth your time.

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