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So I edited a question and went back to check on it later, mostly because I was interested in the answers that were given, only to find that everything I had added as my suggested edit had been done to the post (I mean exactly, down to me putting in an extra line to separate the end of a paragraph) however it had been edited by another person with 5k+ rep and I had not received any reputation, nor can I see any evidence to prove that I was the one who suggested the edit.

Is there any way I can deal with this, as it's a little upsetting that I put in the effort to make the question better only to have someone else steal my work for their own for the sake of a few rep or am I misunderstanding how the edit system works?

The question is this: Tkinker grid weights not behaving as I would expect

And the only edit that has been done to the post is an edit I suggested which is listed as having been done by another user "Right leg".

Tagged as support, not sure if this should be discussion or support?

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    It looks like the person who chose Reject & Edit took issue with the changes you made to the question title: stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/17321545 – BSMP Sep 13 '17 at 15:53
  • @BSMP Are question titles not supposed to be questions though? – Ethan Field Sep 13 '17 at 15:53
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    ...only to have someone else steal my work for their own for the sake of a few rep or am I misunderstanding how the edit system works? Users with 2K+ rep don't gain additional rep from edits. Basically, if you have enough reputation to review suggested edits you can't gain rep from making edits. – BSMP Sep 13 '17 at 15:54
  • @BSMP So then I am understanding how the edit system works, thank you – Ethan Field Sep 13 '17 at 15:54
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    There isn't a rule requiring the title to be in the form of a question, no. – BSMP Sep 13 '17 at 15:55
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    The title change doesn't make the question better or worse in my opinion, so I'm also a little surprised that they chose to fully reject (instead of maybe improve) the suggested edit. – Keiwan Sep 13 '17 at 15:59
  • In fact, looking a little closer I just saw that your title even fixed the "Tkinker" typo, which now makes that user's action seem even more weird. – Keiwan Sep 13 '17 at 16:01
  • @Keiwan Are props given to all contributors if the edit is improved? – Ethan Field Sep 13 '17 at 16:01
  • @EthanField Yes, if they choose "Improve" that will automatically accept the suggested edit and then apply their improved version. – Keiwan Sep 13 '17 at 16:03
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    Note that people who have the right to approve/improve/reject suggested edits don't get any "props" for doing so. – Cody Gray Sep 13 '17 at 16:12
  • I don't really agree with the rejection, but "My question is this" and "Can someone explain" serve little purpose and should be edited out of questions. – Dukeling Sep 13 '17 at 17:26
  • I just recently rejected and edited a suggestion that was 80% correct, 15% missed fixes and 5% completely wrong: a one character change completely changed the answer and invalidated it. I ultimately decided it would be better not to have that wrong change in the edit history, even though the gross majority of their edit was correct. Otherwise, I would have had no problem improving it for the bit they missed. – TemporalWolf Sep 13 '17 at 19:38
  • As ti why he might have chosen "reject" instead of "improve": when using "reject" the new edit starts from the original post and the changes to the body could be redone with a few . While "improve" would start from the edited post and he would have to undo the changes to the title - which is harder to do (if you don't copy and paste the old title before you start editing). – piet.t Sep 14 '17 at 6:27
  • If I were the person, I choose improve edit – Sagar V Sep 14 '17 at 12:41
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So your edit wasn't really "stolen". One of the reviewers decided there was something about your edit that was not good enough, and decided to rejected it. Then went back and applied some of your changes to the post on his/her own. They did not receive any reputation or any other reward that they would have received had they decided to "Improve" your edit instead.

To be perfectly honest, while I didn't like your title edit*, your edit was better than the final edit as you properly indented the import statement that was not formatted as code, so rejection seemed a bit overzealous, but there may have been another issue or perhaps a misclick on the part of the reviewer.

So to address your original question of what to do. In most cases, you do absolutely nothing. A single rejection is not the end of the world and unless you have a lot of rejected edits in the last 7 days, nothing negative will happen to you (if you get enough rejections, you can get automatically banned from suggesting edits).

If you find that you seem to be targeted by a single user (maybe they are going out of their way to find and reject many of your edits and apply the same thing themselves), you can raise a custom moderator flag (click on one of the questions in which you had a rejected edit) and briefly, but completely, explain the concern and why you are flagging the post.

But if you are generally curious as to why your edit was rejected, you can ping any editor using the @-notion in a comment and ask why (autocomplete won't work however). They will be notified of your comment and may choose to respond. They are under no obligation to do so and may choose not to respond simply because they don't want to get engaged in a prolonged discussion about a single edit. If you go this route, be sure you go back and clean up your comments after the reviewer responds or they have had enough time to see the comment. Don't leave it there for months. And don't do this often. Comments are extra noise on the post and you don't want every question with a "reject-and-edit" suggested edit to have a "why did you reject my edit" comment.


* - With regards to your title edit, my issue with it is because it was unnecessary. The original title was very clear and brief, but yours added a lot of unnecessary words just to make it into a question (which is not a requirement of titles), so use this rejection as a learning experience to help your editing skills.

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