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Consider the following scenario:

  • A user comes across an item on the site, say an answer, that is obvious junk and should be nuked
  • As a a result, said user flags the item with a flag that causes it to be pushed into a review queue
  • The users in that queue "review" the item and mark it as okay, disputing the flag
  • The user who flagged the item sees their flag is disputed, and knowing that (once again) the review system has failed, raises a moderator flag on the same item instead
  • A mod reviews that flag, agrees with the flagger, and banishes the trash

What, if anything, happens to the users who incorrectly reviewed the original flag?

I'm asking this not out of spite (okay, maybe a bit of spite, because seriously robo-reviewers need to die) but because this whole process is horribly inefficient and time-wasting:

  • It wastes the flagger's time because they have to flag the item once, watch their flags history to see if their flag was wrongly disputed, then raise another mod flag with a nice description of why that flag should actually have been upheld
  • It wastes the time of the good reviewers who upheld the original flag, but were overridden by the bad reviewers who disputed it
  • It wastes the time of a moderator because they have to manually process a flag that really should have been handled by the review system

In other words, everyone who was trying to do the right thing gets their time wasted - that doesn't seem fair to me. To cut down on this waste, users who flag would be tempted to simply flag everything with a mod flag, bypassing the review queues completely and potentially adding unnecessary work for the mods, both of which are problematic.

I'm wondering if there is any system (automated or manual) in place to identify this sort of pattern and find users who repeatedly, incorrectly approve flagged items, that are later upheld by moderators? And if there is, are any penalties (i.e. review bans) levied against these repeat offenders?

  • Manual bans are definitely a thing. I don't know if any part of that outside of audits is automated though. users who flag would be tempted to simply flag everything with a mod flag - Flags for things the community can handle get declined. – BSMP Sep 7 '17 at 8:56
  • this is probably more likely to happen if flag message includes link to troublesome review item (this link can be retrieved from post timeline) – gnat Sep 7 '17 at 9:06
14

There are no automatic bans in these cases. As far as the system is concerned, the original flag was "disputed" by the community and thus officially resolved. There is no connection made between your follow-up custom flag and the original NAA/VLQ flag, even if it's on the same post.

(And you wouldn't want there to be such an automatic connection made by the system. A custom flag can literally mean anything and doesn't even have to be connected to the quality of the post itself.)

If you know that something went wrong in review, you should mention that as part of your custom flag where you ask a moderator to re-review it. You've got plenty of room to explain, and since you're having to raise a custom flag anyway, you might as well throw it in. That will cause a moderator to look into it.

We can easily investigate the review history of any post, so it's quite easy to tell if anyone botched the reviews. If you have it handy, you can include a link to the original review item, but if not, no big deal because we can find it with one or two clicks.

I like to always check the review history when I handle flags on obvious garbage, but if I'm on a mobile device or just feeling lazy, I won't. Again, you can persuade us to do so in the custom flag. And you really need to do so, as part of your justification for raising a custom flag when a standard one would appear to do.

In any case, the response will likely be a manual moderator-imposed ban to the reviewer(s) who said such garbage "Looks OK", but obviously we'll use our best judgment to determine whether that's appropriate in each individual case. Moderators have more information available than regular users do, so if you suspect a problem, go ahead and flag so we can investigate.

To cut down on this waste, users who flag would be tempted to simply flag everything with a mod flag, bypassing the review queues completely and potentially adding unnecessary work for the mods, both of which are problematic.

Yeah, don't do this. It solves none of the original problems, and creates new ones. We'll decline those flags with the canned message instructing you to raise standard flags instead.

  • 1
    maybe it would be nice to allow leaving an optional comment for any kind of flag, including "not-an-answer", "no-longer-needed", etc. That way, community reviewing the flags would have access to extra explanations when needed. – Cœur Sep 9 '17 at 16:27

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