4

As a new user, I don't know whether or not I should try to simply suggest a fix that fits within the coding style/structure that a user already has or to suggest something that might be a completely different paradigm but leave the coder with better code WITH a fix.

Often times I could suggest changes in an answer that would essentially completely re-write the OP's code and usually this would end up making the code better at the cost of suggesting a change that the OP might not understand even with a proper explanation.

What is the "proper" type of answer or is there no "proper" answer in this context?

This is specifically regarding questions that focus on fixing erroneous code.

  • 4
    I'd say neither is more 'proper' than the other. One or the other might be more useful to the community depending on the exact context. You could also post both versions in your answer if you have the time and inclination but choosing whichever you think is the better, more useful answer is OK. – BSMP Aug 31 '17 at 14:42
  • In this case, would it be worthwhile to post two separate answers instead of one combined answer? – Steven Goodman Aug 31 '17 at 14:45
  • 7
    Answers should aim to be helpful to future visitors. If you think that improving the code would be helpful, do so. – Martijn Pieters Aug 31 '17 at 14:48
  • 2
    I like to do both. Show then how to fix what they have and then show them the "proper" way to do it. I do this a lot when someone uses a C approach in C++ to show them the C++ way of doing it. – NathanOliver Aug 31 '17 at 14:49
  • 3
    Remember that you're not checking code into someone else's repository, so don't feel like you have to follow their style or approach. There's plenty of room for multiple answers, so if you want to offer a completely different solution to a problem, forge ahead. – Bill the Lizard Aug 31 '17 at 15:32
  • 1
    i don't see how splitting it into two separate answers would make it any better. If anything, it may be misconstrued as an attempt to get more rep out of it and get a negative reaction. – Kevin B Aug 31 '17 at 16:23

You must log in to answer this question.

Browse other questions tagged .