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In celebration of my recent electoral victory, I've been handing out party favors in the form of review bans to users who've dealt improperly with posts confronted in review queues. I've only done this in really obvious cases, but it's been disappointing how often unhelpful actions are taken.

Along the way, I've discovered that many users are not actually aware that they should be flagging problematic posts. They often think downvoting and/or leaving a comment is sufficient "handling", when it is not.

It's easy to understand why they might miss this option, since the UI doesn't really suggest it. "Flag" is there in its usual spot, as a tiny little link underneath the post, thus ensuring that only the people who know where it is will find it. You could argue that these are the only people who should be reviewing, but when a significant portion of your users are misunderstanding your interface, blaming the users is the least productive option.

I suggest we fix this by making flagging a more obvious choice. In particular, I suggest that we put a big ol' blue "Flag" button up at the top of the review queue screen, along with the other "suggested" choices. Here is a mock-up:

Big blue "Flag" button, with tooltip reading "this answer needs moderator attention"

As shown above, I'd make the tooltip say:

this answer needs moderator attention

in parallel with the "No Action Needed" button, which says:

this answer seems to be valid


That's for answers, of course. Questions would be essentially the same:

Big blue "Flag" button, with tooltip reading "this question needs moderator attention"


Clicking on the big blue "Flag" button would pop up the flag dialog that you know and love. It would be exactly the same one you'd get by clicking the tiny little "flag" link text underneath the post. All of the same options would be available, depending on whether the post was a question or an answer, and you could get to it either place, whichever you were most comfortable with.

Clicking "Flag" on a false-positive audit would, of course, fail the audit. There is never a reason to flag a quality post in review.

Sure, we have a master guide that explains how you should go about reviewing in these queues, but let's be honest—nobody reads all that. A good UI needs to make appropriate actions obvious and inviting. It is my contention that flagging is frequently an appropriate action in the Late Answers and First Posts review queues, and thus needs to be more obvious and inviting.

It was previously suggested to add flagging as an option to the Low Quality Posts review queue, but that would need to be done more carefully, since the raison d'être for two of the flag options (NAA and VLQ) is essentially to put the post into that queue. The only real advantage of a "Flag" button there would be to facilitate handling of spam, but I have not observed this being a significant problem. You'd also have to use a different flag dialog, which would potentially increase confusion and would certainly increase implementation complexity. I think "Recommend Deletion" is sufficient in LQP.

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    Are the red circles part of the UI or are you just indicating where we should look at? – honk Aug 28 '17 at 12:54
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    @honk: They're part of the question quality filter on Meta. Posts with screenshots will be rejected without them. – Josh Caswell Aug 28 '17 at 12:57
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    +1 for freehand – Luuklag Aug 28 '17 at 13:07
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    I'm not an UX expert but my bet is on that you get much more flags for posts where a vote or a comment would suffice. Although I agree something needs attention in those queues, putting the option you favor so prominent in the topbar (with or without red circle) doesn't seem like a good idea. – rene Aug 28 '17 at 13:08
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    "There is never a reason to flag a quality post in review." I feel like we should be able to flag bad audit Q&As so they can be taken out of the audit list. Maybe that's a topic for another feature request, though... – TylerH Aug 28 '17 at 13:21
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    Totally different, @TylerH. Even if that was added, it shouldn't be in the same flag dialog. That would be too confusing. Perhaps something like a "Dispute" button, after you've failed the audit. Pretty sure that's been requested before. – Cody Gray Aug 28 '17 at 13:22
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    @CodyGray yup: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/188780/… – Jon Clements Aug 28 '17 at 13:24
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    Wait, this isn't about a new bot to help reviews by supplying suggestions via dynamic freehand circles? Regardless, this change looks quite a bit more intuitive. – bitnine Aug 28 '17 at 13:33
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    "Clicking "Flag" on a false-positive audit would, of course, fail the audit." I think, nobody should be punished for just viewing the flagging options. Reminds me of failing an audit for adding a comment... – honk Aug 28 '17 at 13:36
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    I have to agree with @honk here. I'll frequently click on the flag button just so I can remind myself what flagging options are available. – DJMcMayhem Aug 28 '17 at 17:08
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    "when a significant portion of your users are misunderstanding your interface, blaming the users is the least productive option" grumble Requires Editing grumble – Jeffrey Bosboom Aug 28 '17 at 23:40
  • I also agree with @honk here. I often go through the duplicate finding dialog to see if the question has a duplicate. Sometimes the question doesn't have one, or the target might not have accepted/upvoted answers. Punishing someone for that seems strange. Not to mention, I also check the flag dialog once every day to see if the developers have finally added the "This question has 300 lines of code, where 30 would have been sufficient to reproduce the problem!" flag. But alas... – Nisarg Aug 29 '17 at 3:29
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    @NisargShah: "But alas..." - What's wrong with flagshould be closed...off-topic because...Questions seeking debugging help... (MCVE)? – honk Aug 29 '17 at 7:11
  • @honk Minimal tends to get subjective. I haven't seen any cases where a question is closed because the code is too long. MCVE closures are often because there is no code or insufficient to reproduce. I might be wrong though. But then we are deviating from the original question. – Nisarg Aug 29 '17 at 7:27
  • Can we implement something like this meta.stackoverflow.com/a/355902/3956566 before we implement the big blue button? – Yvette Colomb Aug 30 '17 at 4:55
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I would only see a problem with this:

The current UI is pretty flexible and straightforward. Blue buttons for when you are done with the post, and the post paraphernalia along post itself. If you add this button, the blue buttons wouldn't mean I'm done with this post, show me the next, nor it would mean possible actions on the post. The meaning would dilute itself.

We expect that the users read the fine help center and just in time help for, well, pretty much everything and in the case of these users the first thing they see when they open the queue is this text:

This is the first question asked by a new user. Help them learn to use the site by reviewing their post. (less)

No Action Needed when this post needs no action from you.

I'm Done is only available if you've done one of the following:

  • Vote up or down to rate the question's quality and usefulness
  • Edit to improve the question's appearance or clarity
  • Comment to leave constructive feedback for the author, or vote up existing comments
  • Flag to notify the moderators of serious problems
  • Close questions that cannot or should not be answered here

Be sure to leave a comment if you can help the user out, upvote the question if you can't find any problems with it, or click Skip if you are not sure and want to go to the next item.

Now, whatever the misgivings one would have about the text (I would prefer skip up on that list), it specifically says all the actions that can be take and when they should be taken. It describes you all the tools that you have at your disposal. If they can't "figure it out", then maybe these users are not ready for the queues.

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    Maybe then add red freehand circle as part of UI to where "Flag" currently is? – wha7ever Aug 29 '17 at 0:55
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    Hmm, that's a fair point, and one that I had not considered. On the other hand, the buttons in the other queues certainly include actionable items. Furthermore, I'd say that flagging would be the only thing you'd need to do with a post, so after you raise a flag, you would be done with the post and it could automatically move on to the next one. – Cody Gray Aug 29 '17 at 5:16
  • "If they can't "figure it out", then maybe these users are not ready for the queues." But as Cody says, "but when a significant portion of your users are misunderstanding your interface, blaming the users is the least productive option." – Display name Aug 29 '17 at 10:44
  • @Orangesandlemons numbers? I feel that Cody pull those out of thin air. – Braiam Aug 29 '17 at 11:11
  • I'm pulling them from my experience processing gobs and gobs of flags over the past couple of weeks. The air isn't particularly thin where I am; I am pretty close to sea level. :-) I don't have any more hard data to give you. I don't know how to pull that data, and I don't even know if it exists in a pullable form. – Cody Gray Aug 29 '17 at 13:37
  • At the risk of making myself look dumb, I thought it was expected to just comment/downvote if the question was bad but not terrible. It says "Flag... [for] serious problems". I only flagged if it was terrible. Button or no button, the text needs clarified. – RyanZim Aug 30 '17 at 0:34
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    @Ryan You are supposed to flag a post when it needs to be deleted. Answers that do not answer the question need to be deleted. Spam needs to be deleted. Gibberish posts (whether questions or answers) need to be deleted. What doesn't need to be deleted are wrong answers, answers you disagree with, off-topic questions, etc. Those should be handled with a comment and a downvote. (This guidance isn't unique to the review queue, though. It applies to the "flag" link anywhere you see it on the site.) – Cody Gray Aug 30 '17 at 5:07
  • @RyanZim that's yet another jargon of SE. Serious problems means "problems you can't solve with the tools at your disposal". They used that specific wording to prevent people from flagging for inane stuff that users are able to deal with. – Braiam Aug 30 '17 at 10:49
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In addition, it would be nice to also have this in the very low quality reviews, if only for the purpose of raising a spam flag.

Scenario: a spam post pops up in the low quality review. The correct action is not just to delete vote, but also to flag as spam.

With the current system, your option is to either go to the actual post, find the answer and flag it there (oh it was just a review audit). Or you can pick the option that says "this is a link-only answer and not spam". But... it is spam?

It is notable that not flagging spam as spam, but just silently deleting it instead, makes the dysfunctional audit system happy. Because... there is not even a flag option.

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