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Related: What determines what tags will get a popup with usage guidance?

The and tags are routinely misused; the tag usage guidance is very specific that you should use them only for questions about the tools themselves, not for general programming questions, but many people ignore that.

I think that a tag warning (like we have for ) may help with that.

The text could be something like this:

This tag should only be used for questions about the tool itself, not for general programming questions, even if you happen to be using that tool to develop the code.

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    Would it apply to the synonyms of the tag? Also, given that VS 2008, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2015 and 2017 are not synonyms of Visual-studio (for good reasons), shouldn't there be similar warnings on them as well? Aug 14, 2017 at 7:21
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    and xcode?
    – Cœur
    Aug 14, 2017 at 7:37
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    @NisargShah Depends on whether we have a widespread problem with those tags being misused. I suspect that most of the users adding the IDE tags for regular code questions probably don't pay enough attention to think of adding their specific version of it. But I might be wrong.
    – jpmc26
    Aug 14, 2017 at 9:21
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    Then a popup should also go on macros, as per: What to do about [macros]? and seeing that there are still way to many questions tagged with macros
    – Luuklag
    Aug 14, 2017 at 12:03
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    @jpmc26 I daily edit c# questions to remove visual-studio-* tags since they don't apply. It's not quite normal to have a problem specific to a VS version yet they are constantly added Aug 14, 2017 at 12:53
  • this question makes one basic flawed assumption, that people actually read those popup warnings or the tag descriptions in the first place. eclipse, netbeans, intellij get added to just about every java question regardless what the question is actually about. It is as if every *NIX question was tagged vim or emacs regardless what the question was about. This tag SPAMMING behavior is not going to change passively anymore than SO being treated like a forum with tagging in the title and SOLVED being added to the titles, will change passively.
    – user177800
    Aug 15, 2017 at 18:14
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    @JarrodRoberson Even though there exists the larger problem of people ignoring warnings and not reading tag descriptions, there still is value in adding such warnings. Dozens of questions get asked every day ignoring the How to Ask guidelines and warnings (Especially the Your post contains mostly code warning), but we have no real way to measure how many of the hundreds of questions that are asked correctly that were corrected/made acceptable because the user, before posting, saw a warning that told them a behavior isn't okay. Adding a tag warning can't hurt, and potentially can help loads.
    – Davy M
    Aug 15, 2017 at 18:41
  • @JarrodRoberson Some people read it. For example, when I went to submit my first burnination request it warned me that I ought to read the Meta post describing how/when to do that, and it worked - I read the post. Aug 15, 2017 at 18:48
  • @EJoshuaS - your experience is not universal
    – user177800
    Aug 15, 2017 at 18:51
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    @JarrodRoberson That's true, but it still resulted in one less person not reading the documentation prior to posting. Aug 15, 2017 at 20:20
  • Optimize for pearls @Jarrod, throw the sand away.
    – Braiam
    Aug 16, 2017 at 0:21
  • By a 'tag warning' DYM within the tag info page, or a pop-up that is shown if the tag is applied (or an attempt is made to apply it)? If the former, I don't think that's enough, if the latter, plus 1,000,000. Jan 10, 2019 at 8:47
  • @AndrewThompson: "Tag warnings" generally refer to the latter. For instance, if you try to add the [seo] tag to a question, a tag warning will appear for that.
    – V2Blast StaffMod
    Aug 2 at 22:51

2 Answers 2

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For , I'd suggest something a bit more detailed. It's my experience that people think they are building "an Android Studio app", so I think the warning text proposed in that question is likely insufficiently clear to such users.

My suggestion, feedback welcome:

Do not use the [android-studio] tag for questions about developing Android apps using Android Studio. Use the [android] tag instead.

Only use the [android-studio] tag for questions about the features and functionality of the Android Studio IDE itself, not about code written in Android Studio.

Perhaps someone with subject matter expertise on Visual Studio questions could write a similar blurb for that one.


For purposes of allowing its use in the UI, I additionally license the text of this post under CC-0.

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    "Wait! Is your question about the Android Studio IDE itself, or are you just using it for development? Only use the [android-studio] tag for questions about the features and functionality of the Android Studio IDE itself, not merely because you are using Android Studio to write code. Questions about developing Android apps, whether you're using Android Studio or another IDE, should be tagged only as [android]."
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Aug 9 at 21:03
  • isn't writing code using android studio a feature of the android studio ide?
    – Kevin B
    Aug 9 at 21:09
  • @CodyGray Oh, that's much better than mine. It conveys properly that it's a question, rather than detecting an error.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Aug 9 at 21:21
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    Yeah, the main improvement that I was going for was turning around your advice, presenting it in a more actionable order. The "Wait!" is an optional touch, which some might find annoying.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Aug 9 at 22:10
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    @KevinB: I think the distinction Ryan and Cody are trying to establish is whether the question is about the Android Studio IDE itself vs. being about the code you've written (that you just happened to do in Android Studio).
    – V2Blast StaffMod
    Aug 10 at 23:33
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    I'm guessing what @KevinB is getting at is that many unsophisticated users will still think that their question is about Android Studio because, duh, that's the thing they see on their screen and now they are having a problem. I don't know how exactly to make this easy for beginners to understand, but perhaps something even more explicit along the lines of "just because you are using Andriod Studio does not mean you are having a problem with Andriod Studio; if the problem is with the code you wrote, please don't add this tag."
    – tripleee
    Aug 11 at 5:53
  • Yes, that's entirely the message that Ryan and I were trying to convey. If you have suggestions on improving the wording, please do offer them up, @tripleee. Editing the post would probably be better than burying it in a comment. There is at least one CM actively working on escalating this to a developer as we speak, so there's no time like the present. Would you believe that some people think Ryan and I are long-winded?!
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Aug 11 at 5:55
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    One of the reasons I'm hesitant is that making the text more explicit will help some users but scare away some other users who think the alphabet is challenging.
    – tripleee
    Aug 11 at 6:00
  • Note that the CM is using something based on Cody's version, not mine, since everyone involved (including me) agreed it was better.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Aug 11 at 7:46
  • Nah, i was mostly being sarcastic
    – Kevin B
    Aug 11 at 14:27
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Putting these in a separate answer because I'm not an SME here, and based on Cody Gray's suggested wording for Android Studio:

For :

Wait! Is your question about the Visual Studio IDE itself, or are you just using it for development? Only use the [visual-studio] tag for questions about the features and functionality of the Visual Studio IDE itself, not merely because you are using Visual Studio to write code.

Questions about code written in Visual Studio should instead be tagged with the language the code is written in (such as [c++], [c#], [c], [vb.net], etc.) and any frameworks or libraries involved in the question.

If your question is about the IDE itself, double check: does the title bar say "Visual Studio Code" ("Code" on macOS)? If yes, please tag [visual-studio-code] instead!

For (while we're at it...) - language examples taken from the list of built-in languages on https://code.visualstudio.com/docs/languages/overview:

Wait! Is your question about the Visual Studio Code editor itself, or are you just using it for development? Only use the [visual-studio-code] tag for questions about the features and functionality of the Visual Studio Code editor itself, not merely because you are using Visual Studio Code to write code.

Questions about code written in Visual Studio Code should instead be tagged with the language the code is written in (such as [javascript], [typescript], [css], [html], etc.) and any frameworks or libraries involved in the question (such as [react-js]).

If your question is about the editor itself, double check: does the title bar say "Visual Studio Code" ("Code" on macOS)? If not, please tag [visual-studio] instead!

Feedback is, as always, welcome, especially because I don't spend much time in these tags, so I don't know what exactly people are mis-tagging.

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    These warnings looks too long winded. See SEO tag warning for an example. Messages should be short and to the point, specially since it's not expected by the user.
    – Braiam
    Aug 11 at 0:04
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    I would also add something like "Additionally, beware of confusing Visual Studio with Visual Studio Code (AKA, VSCode) as they are two different products" to the end of both warnings. Quite often, I encounter questions about [visual-studio] tagged [visual-studio-code] and vice versa. Aug 11 at 0:04
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    To Braiam's point above, my suggestion could be shortened to "Not to be confused with Visual Studio [Code]". Aug 11 at 0:05
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    It might make sense to just template this (whatever we finalise). I would hazard to say that all of the IDE tags have this same issue. I don't know what kind of system support is available for that though. Aug 11 at 0:23

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