2

So I've been receiving some stray upvotes here and there and sometimes, when I look back on the answers I gave, they seem unclear, and even borderline wrong. A post I sometimes get upvotes on is this which had quite a vague (and in its first revision) wrong information. Only months after I answered and had it accepted with +8 or 9 had I noticed it was unclear and wrong. See the fifth revision for the overhaul.

I spent a good 1 hour re-editing to fit my standards (and clarifying somewhat unclear or incorrect information). The problem is that it's quite old, and my edit may not be seen by many of the people who upvoted it originally based on wrong information which would have spread misinformation. What can I do, if anything to clear up misinformation?

  • Not really sure what part of original post you call incorrect... but as a sample it is fine. – Alexei Levenkov Aug 8 '17 at 1:16
  • @AlexeiLevenkov Not the best example. I've added a different one. I'm just asking generally though, is there anything I should do to try to clear up misinformation. – Li357 Aug 8 '17 at 1:24
3

You should edit post (as you did) to contain answer that you believe is valid. Anything else is optional.

There is nothing you can do about people who already looked at the post, just optimize for future visitors (even if small number) and for yourself to be proud of your posts.

If you want to also prevent other from repeating mistakes you had in an answer you may add section to your answer about "following approaches do not work ... because ..." or something along those lines, but keep it short. If you believe the misinformation is widespread consider adding (probably self-answered) question that targets it instead. There also good chance that there is an existing post describing particular misinterpretation - I'd linking to such post with "common pitfalls discussed in ..." rather that writing my own explanation.

How far you want to go in editing/explaining all cases is personal call. I'd check how many views question has (168 in 9 month like on linked question is not much) to decide how much effort to put in question. I'd personally just stop at fixing error in this particular case.

  • Okay, I figured there wouldn't be much to do. Thanks. – Li357 Aug 8 '17 at 1:32

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .