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After reading Shog9's post about flags, I decided to look through the available flags again (mostly out of curiosity, since I've never taken a thorough look at all the flags). In doing so I read the description for the VLQ flag, and was a bit surprised to realise that it mentions (severe) formatting problems as valid criteria for using this flag.

Flag dialog with VLQ wording circled

That in itself isn't so surprising; I've seen some pretty horrendous formatting on here before. The thing that's surprising is that the flag's description also says:

This question is unlikely to be salvageable through editing[..]

So my question is this: Is there ever a situation where formatting issues could be so severe as to not be recoverable through editing? If so, what are some examples?

  • 12
    Hmm, good point. I can't think of anything either. This entire flag option is badly in need of a revamp. See Merge the "Not An Answer" and "Very Low Quality" flags into one (that one's almost two years old now, so maybe it's time to ask for it again...) – Cody Gray Aug 8 '17 at 5:42
  • 1
    technically you can edit everything, but if someone posts a dozen or more lines of JavaScript without linebreaks (seen that before) I'd rather flag it or just skip it before I do the posters homework. – jps Aug 8 '17 at 7:54
  • As far as C#, SQL, HTML or JS are concerned, even if there are no line breaks, you can use a code formatter to fix that in a second. Probably similar tools are available for other languages.. – Nisarg Aug 8 '17 at 8:02
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    Some languages the formatting is part of the syntax however - make, python spring to mind – mjs Aug 8 '17 at 8:07
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    @Nisarg yes, code can be trivially autoformatted, but if the asker or answerer can't be bothered to do that before posting, then the quality of the entire post can be doubted, if you ask me. – CodeCaster Aug 8 '17 at 8:09
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    I've seen big blocks of malformatted/invalid xml, which could not be reformatted by an editor. Doing this manually would not be justified. – jHilscher Aug 8 '17 at 8:24
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    I suppose if someones done a heck of a lot of bad formatting to the extent that no-one has the time to edit it it may be de facto unsalvagable, if still technically salvageable – Orangesandlemons Aug 8 '17 at 8:24
  • @CodeCaster (1) That is true for experienced users, but new users don't often know the { } code button (and how it works), and tend to post the code as is. That results in code that looks poorly formatted - or worse, single line of unending code. (2) Not a lot of freshers (at least in India) know that there are tools that can auto-format the code. I didn't know that either until a few months ago. I think it is fair for the experienced users to help out for such minor issues. – Nisarg Aug 8 '17 at 8:44
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    @Nisarg it is also expected of you, before you join an online community and start posting there, that you "lurk" for a while to see how other users behave and what commonly accepted post formats are. Within a few minutes of doing that on Stack Overflow, you'll see posts with nicely formatted code. You then are supposed to research how to write such a post, if that's what you signed up for. Users who dump their code in the textbox, see the non-highlighted preview and think "This is fine, this will do", are not the users other users should spend time and effort on. – CodeCaster Aug 8 '17 at 8:46
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    @CodeCaster I agree and it is a fair expectation. But that isn't happening right now. I have rarely seen well formatted questions in "First Review" queue. So the two options are, fix the formatting in 10 seconds, or flag for VLQ. I'd probably choose to fix the formatting. – Nisarg Aug 8 '17 at 8:58
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To give an example of unsalvageable code:

import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from matplotlib.path import Path from matplotlib.spines import Spine from matplotlib.projections.polar import PolarAxes from matplotlib.projections import register_projection
def radar_factory(num_vars, frame='circle'): theta = np.linspace(0, 2*np.pi, num_vars, endpoint=False) theta += np.pi/2 def draw_poly_patch(self): verts = unit_poly_verts(theta) return plt.Polygon(verts, closed=True, edgecolor='k') def draw_circle_patch(self): return plt.Circle((0.5, 0.5), 0.5) patch_dict = {'polygon': draw_poly_patch, 'circle': draw_circle_patch} if frame not in patch_dict: raise ValueError('unknown value for `frame`: %s' % frame) class RadarAxes(PolarAxes): name = 'radar' RESOLUTION = 1 draw_patch = patch_dict[frame] def fill(self, *args, **kwargs): """Override fill so that line is closed by default""" closed = kwargs.pop('closed', True) return super(RadarAxes, self).fill(closed=closed, *args, **kwargs) def plot(self, *args, **kwargs): """Override plot so that line is closed by default""" lines = super(RadarAxes, self).plot(*args, **kwargs) for line in lines: self._close_line(line) def _close_line(self, line): x, y = line.get_data() # FIXME: markers at x[0], y[0] get doubled-up if x[0] != x[-1]: x = np.concatenate((x, [x[0]])) y = np.concatenate((y, [y[0]])) line.set_data(x, y) def set_varlabels(self, labels): self.set_thetagrids(np.degrees(theta), labels) def _gen_axes_patch(self): return self.draw_patch() def _gen_axes_spines(self): if frame == 'circle': return PolarAxes._gen_axes_spines(self) # The following is a hack to get the spines (i.e. the axes frame) # to draw correctly for a polygon frame. # spine_type must be 'left', 'right', 'top', 'bottom', or `circle`. spine_type = 'circle' verts = unit_poly_verts(theta) # close off polygon by repeating first vertex verts.append(verts[0]) path = Path(verts) spine = Spine(self, spine_type, path) spine.set_transform(self.transAxes) return {'polar': spine} register_projection(RadarAxes) return theta def unit_poly_verts(theta): x0, y0, r = [0.5] * 3 verts = [(r*np.cos(t) + x0, r*np.sin(t) + y0) for t in theta] return verts def example_data(): data = [ ['Sulfate', 'Nitrate', 'EC', 'OC1', 'OC2', 'OC3', 'OP', 'CO', 'O3'], ('Basecase', [ [0.88, 0.01, 0.03, 0.03, 0.00, 0.06, 0.01, 0.00, 0.00], [0.07, 0.95, 0.04, 0.05, 0.00, 0.02, 0.01, 0.00, 0.00], [0.01, 0.02, 0.85, 0.19, 0.05, 0.10, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00], [0.02, 0.01, 0.07, 0.01, 0.21, 0.12, 0.98, 0.00, 0.00], [0.01, 0.01, 0.02, 0.71, 0.74, 0.70, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00]]), ('With CO', [ [0.88, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02, 0.00, 0.05, 0.00, 0.05, 0.00], [0.08, 0.94, 0.04, 0.02, 0.00, 0.01, 0.12, 0.04, 0.00], [0.01, 0.01, 0.79, 0.10, 0.00, 0.05, 0.00, 0.31, 0.00], [0.00, 0.02, 0.03, 0.38, 0.31, 0.31, 0.00, 0.59, 0.00], [0.02, 0.02, 0.11, 0.47, 0.69, 0.58, 0.88, 0.00, 0.00]]), ('With O3', [ [0.89, 0.01, 0.07, 0.00, 0.00, 0.05, 0.00, 0.00, 0.03], [0.07, 0.95, 0.05, 0.04, 0.00, 0.02, 0.12, 0.00, 0.00], [0.01, 0.02, 0.86, 0.27, 0.16, 0.19, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00], [0.01, 0.03, 0.00, 0.32, 0.29, 0.27, 0.00, 0.00, 0.95], [0.02, 0.00, 0.03, 0.37, 0.56, 0.47, 0.87, 0.00, 0.00]]), ('CO & O3', [ [0.87, 0.01, 0.08, 0.00, 0.00, 0.04, 0.00, 0.00, 0.01], [0.09, 0.95, 0.02, 0.03, 0.00, 0.01, 0.13, 0.06, 0.00], [0.01, 0.02, 0.71, 0.24, 0.13, 0.16, 0.00, 0.50, 0.00], [0.01, 0.03, 0.00, 0.28, 0.24, 0.23, 0.00, 0.44, 0.88], [0.02, 0.00, 0.18, 0.45, 0.64, 0.55, 0.86, 0.00, 0.16]]) ] return data if __name__ == '__main__': N = 9 theta = radar_factory(N, frame='polygon') data = example_data() spoke_labels = data.pop(0) fig, axes = plt.subplots(figsize=(9, 9), nrows=2, ncols=2, subplot_kw=dict(projection='radar')) fig.subplots_adjust(wspace=0.25, hspace=0.20, top=0.85, bottom=0.05) colors = ['b', 'r', 'g', 'm', 'y'] # Plot the four cases from the example data on separate axes for ax, (title, case_data) in zip(axes.flatten(), data): ax.set_rgrids([0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8]) ax.set_title(title, weight='bold', size='medium', position=(0.5, 1.1), horizontalalignment='center', verticalalignment='center') for d, color in zip(case_data, colors): ax.plot(theta, d, color=color) ax.fill(theta, d, facecolor=color, alpha=0.25) ax.set_varlabels(spoke_labels) # add legend relative to top-left plot ax = axes[0, 0] labels = ('Factor 1', 'Factor 2', 'Factor 3', 'Factor 4', 'Factor 5') legend = ax.legend(labels, loc=(0.9, .95), labelspacing=0.1, fontsize='small') fig.text(0.5, 0.965, '5-Factor Solution Profiles Across Four Scenarios', horizontalalignment='center', color='black', weight='bold', size='large') plt.show()

Since this is python, which requires correct indentations, there is no way to reproduce a working example from this "one-liner". A question including such code would need to be closed because of severe formatting issues.

  • 2
    VLQ is a flag for removal, not simply closure. – Josh Caswell Aug 8 '17 at 12:02
  • of course the flag should only be used if the poster is not able to perform an edit (as nobody but him would be able to do the necessary edit), possibly because he is not a member of SO anymore or so. – ImportanceOfBeingErnest Aug 8 '17 at 12:26

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