84

I've recently seen a user who keeps answering multiple questions with jiberish only to then instantly delete them. Then, if said user knows an answer to the question, the post is edited with an actual answer and is then undeleted hence marking it as the first answer to the question. If not, then the deleted post remains deleted.

This is an obvious attempt to get more attention from other answers, since answers are ordered by submission date (after accept/up-vote status). While it might not have any great impact overall, I believe any unsportsmanlike behavior is worthy of discussion. Not only is this unfair towards other answerers, but arguably also abusive towards the post edit/delete system.

I'm guessing the right thing to do here is to just flag and move on.

However, with only a small subset of the community being able to see deleted answers, and with an even smaller subset having mod-tools, this might be difficult to detect/prevent. This wouldn't be an issue if undeleteing an answer updated the submission date to the current date. Perhaps a change worth considering?


However, there appears to be a way to abuse the system even further. If the (deleted) jibberish post is replaced with anything that even resembles an answer to the question within the 5-minute grace period, the jibberish bit will not show up in the edit history but will instead look like an genuine answer. This opens up the possibility for more misconduct.

For example:

  • [12:00:00] - Question is posted
  • [12:00:05] - User A posts an answer with nonsense in the body.
  • [12:00:06] - User A deletes the answer.
  • [12:04:00] - User B posts a good answer.
  • [12:04:30] - User A copies User B's answer and pastes it into their own (deleted) answer.
  • [12:04:31] - User A undeletes their answer.

Not only will A's answer appear at the top, but User B will appear to have plagiarized A's answer!

Perhaps this isn't an issue until it becomes one (I haven't seen this happen), but I thought I'd bring this up anyway...

Opinions?

I don't think this question is a duplicate of Placeholder Answers: Will update with answer soon!, since it is about posting placeholder answers, but that ultimately have good intentions. This topic leans more towards the abusive side of this behavior, for example to steal someone else's code and claim it as your own without mods being able to prove otherwise.

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    Two possible solutions occur to me. The recommended one would be a custom moderator flag that explains the problem. The more devious one would be to catch and flag the initial revision of their post as rude/abusive. – Cody Gray Aug 4 '17 at 10:30
  • @CodyGray, there wouldn't be a revision to flag though if the answer was edited within the grace period. So just flag the answer I guess? – Chris Aug 4 '17 at 10:33
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    Yeah, I meant to flag the answer. You're supposed to flag based on what you actually see, so that would be legitimate. Problem is, like you point out, it's not likely to actually work unless you do it with some friends all at the same time. Flags don't interrupt the grace period like they should, even for moderators, so that makes behavior like this difficult to track down. However, comments do interrupt the grace period, so that would be one way to capture the evidence. – Cody Gray Aug 4 '17 at 10:38
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    @CodyGray, okay. Sounds like a feature-request where the submission date is updated whenever an answer is un-deleted would solve both issues, don't you think? Flagging perhaps should too, but this would remove the issue altogether and flagging wouldn't be needed (for this particular issue). – Chris Aug 4 '17 at 11:00
  • @CodyGray, yes the deletion does, but that hardly proves the abusive behavior because you can edit the body of the answer to something that looks genuine. Let me show you... – Chris Aug 4 '17 at 11:08
  • @CodyGray, not sure if you followed along as I was doing this below. The first answer below was like this: i.imgur.com/MEjlNf0.png. I then posted a new "genuine" answer. Then copied the genuine answer and pasted into the old answer, undeleted and voila! – Chris Aug 4 '17 at 11:13
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    A possible solution to grace period abuse could be to just end the grace period short and create a revision entry if a significant amount of text was altered. – yannis Aug 4 '17 at 11:15
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    @yannis I wouldn't combine the grace period with an arbitrary amount of changed data. I would combine it with interactions, like a flag, a comment, a vote (either up or down) and a delete vote. Thus if someone deletes the answer and edits it, then that must create a new revision, even in the grace period. – Tom Aug 4 '17 at 11:18
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    @Tom comments should already end the grace period for questions. So a simple solution is to extend it to answers, and add Deletion to the criteria the ends the grace period – psubsee2003 Aug 4 '17 at 11:30
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    @psubsee2003 Actually, comments on answers also end the grace period already. So, really, only the deletion idea would be new. – Kendra Aug 4 '17 at 12:43
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    I've done something like this accidentally a few times. I used to have a GreaseMonkey script which made the Tab key insert four spaces in the editor, but it stopped working and I've never gone and fixed it. Sometimes I hit Tab+Enter reflexively while editing code and this cycles focus to the "Post Answer" button and presses it. It doesn't sound like the user in question is doing this accidentally, but it's a reason not to go on a witch hunt without better revision tools. – Radiodef Aug 7 '17 at 3:15
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    @Radiodef's comment above makes me think that a possible solution would be to consider deletion during grace-period as a complete deletion once the grace-period is over : I accidentally post an answer that shouldn't have been one, I delete it immediately, why keep any trace of it ? And for the actual concerns, we could treat undeletion as posting a new answer altogether (with a new timestamp). – Kaiido Aug 7 '17 at 3:37
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    @Shog9 about 50 per day then. Interesting. – Chris Aug 11 '17 at 15:02
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    @Shog9 if this indeed happens 50 times a day I guess it's just a matter of time until things will slide into plagiarism. It's like an ideal setup to steal from other answers, too tempting to miss – gnat Aug 11 '17 at 17:04
30

Test post:

A genuine answer

foo() {
  return "bar";
}
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    Nice answer and you were the first :). – Tom Aug 4 '17 at 11:14
  • hahaha @Tom. :D – Chris Aug 4 '17 at 11:14
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    Good thing is, the timline for this answer still shows that it has been deleted before. Have you edited this post as well? If yes, then it is sadly not part of the timeline. – Tom Aug 4 '17 at 11:15
  • @Tom, true. I guess it could suggests something. But doesn't prove much. For all you know, I mis-clicked and submitted half and answer, which I later completed and undeleted. – Chris Aug 4 '17 at 11:17
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    @tom, yes. This is how it looked: i.imgur.com/MEjlNf0.png – Chris Aug 4 '17 at 11:18
  • Oh, then "yes the deletion does" is unclear (at least to me), because it sounds like deletion does stop the grace period and any edit would result in a new revision. – Tom Aug 4 '17 at 11:22
  • @Tom, now I am confused... I think Cody deleted the comment I was responding to there. – Chris Aug 4 '17 at 11:25
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    Possible :D. Anyway, your screenshot is quite clear here. I would support a feature question for having "delete" canceling the grace period. Flagging a post should do that as well. – Tom Aug 4 '17 at 11:26
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    Revision do not show the original post either. meta.stackoverflow.com/posts/354473/revisions – Drag and Drop Aug 4 '17 at 12:34
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    @DragandDrop yes they do, just not if the edit was in the first 5 minutes. That's the concern the question is trying to discuss – psubsee2003 Aug 4 '17 at 12:48
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My solution would be to reset the answer post date once it is undeleted.

-20

Test post:

A genuine answer

foo() {
  return "bar";
}
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    You plagiarized the first answer :'(. – Tom Aug 4 '17 at 11:15
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    @Tom, what!? how!? no! :( – Chris Aug 4 '17 at 11:15
  • Lol, people are giving you negative rep as a joke. – PyRulez Aug 22 '17 at 17:34
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    @PyRulez This is meta. Meta doesn't give any rep. – Magisch Aug 22 '17 at 17:54

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