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Very related (but somewhat less specific): What to do with questions where the author inserted gibberish to bypass the minimum length check?

Also related: Is it rude/abusive to knowingly abuse the answer section?

Also related: Does this constitute a "gibberish post"?

I recently encountered this question (screenshot below for those under 10K), which featured the following gem:

Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this. Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this. Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this. Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this. Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this. Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this. Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this. Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this. Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this.Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this. Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this. Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this. Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this. Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this. Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this.Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this. Gotta add more things to write, because bot, won't let me post. Ignore this.

Image for those under 10K: enter image description here

The answers to the linked question suggest voting to close (either as "unclear what you're asking" or "insufficient information to debug"), which makes sense. (The question is, in fact, unclear; I pointed out to the OP in the comments that the fact that he had to include this gibberish to bypass the minimum length indicated that he probably hadn't adequately described his problem, which he hadn't).

It also makes sense to downvote; the tooltip for downvotes says that "This question doesn't show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful." Well, presumably questions that do this are unclear and demonstrate a lack of research effort (because otherwise the OP would've described their problem and their prior research better).

That being said (and this is where my question differs from the other one): in addition to downvoting, voting to close, commenting telling the OP to describe their problem better, and possibly voting to delete (for those with 10k+ reputation), can we also flag these as rude or abusive, given that it was clearly deliberate on the OP's part and they knew full well that they were violating site policy?

The rule described here by one of the moderators states that

I'd only apply the "rude and abusive" flag for something truly abusive, like insults, trolling, and content that was intended to be offensive. These flags shoot to the top of our queue, and can carry heavy penalties if approved, so we're pretty careful in accepting these.

However, there was another post here (where the OP had deliberately obfuscated his code) that the moderators indicated that they would have accepted a rude or abusive flag on given that it was clearly deliberate.

That being said, can I flag this as rude/abusive given that it contains what amounts to gibberish and was clearly a deliberate effort to bypass the rules on the OP's part? Is there an "official" policy on whether these should be flagged?

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    The post was deleted as abusive yesterday... – Servy Aug 2 '17 at 14:46
  • @Servy I know it was deleted as part of moderation yesterday but I can't see the exact reason since I'm under 10K and can't see deleted posts yet. Do you know if there's a way to see if it was deleted as rude/abusive because a moderator accepted a flag or if it was deleted as rude/abusive because a lot of people flagged it? (I'd like a definite answer on whether moderators are likely to accept flags like that). – EJoshuaS - Reinstate Monica Aug 2 '17 at 14:48
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    Yes, that's abusive. Yes, the rude/abusive flag was validated on that question when it was processed by a moderator. Yes, you should have suspected this. :-) – Cody Gray Aug 2 '17 at 14:50
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    ChrisF deleted it (although it was almost deleted without him. – Servy Aug 2 '17 at 14:51
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    Bart Simpson is using SO as the blackboard now? Ay, caramba! – Jon Clements Aug 2 '17 at 14:53
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    Of course it is. If there is a minimum length, it is not to be bypassed. – Mistalis Aug 2 '17 at 14:55
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    This has got me thinking: is it likewise rude/abusive to bypass the jsFiddle rules with bogus code or backtick abuse? – BoltClock Aug 2 '17 at 16:35
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    @BoltClock IMHO it should be considered rude/abusive to violate site rules when the OP is clearly doing it deliberately/knowingly. It's one thing for a new user to post a "me too!" comment because they didn't read the help center and a whole other thing when the system warns them that they're violating a rule and they deliberately bypass the restriction (ignorantia juris non excusat notwithstanding for the new users). – EJoshuaS - Reinstate Monica Aug 2 '17 at 16:47
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    @EJoshuaS: Should such posts be edited, or should the 100 rep penalty be meted onto the author? – BoltClock Aug 2 '17 at 16:48
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    @BoltClock In my opinion they should get the penalty because they did it deliberately. – EJoshuaS - Reinstate Monica Aug 2 '17 at 16:49
  • @BoltClock with JSFiddle the content is (presumed) to be shared in your personally defined forum. You add it to a blog or send it in a message to someone. I do not think bypassing the filter is bad form as long as you can share your code in the correct context. A question in SO is both the content and the forum, so I feel differently about bypassing the filter there. – Eric Aldinger Aug 4 '17 at 0:08
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    @Eric Aldinger: Yes, users should not be required to include the entire fiddle in the question itself unless absolutely necessary. In this case, though, bypassing the filter refers to including a bogus code block in such a way that you might as well not link to the fiddle at all. – BoltClock Aug 4 '17 at 4:32
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    Just edit it out and vote to close. This flag is stretched way too far. – Ry- Aug 18 '17 at 4:14
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    My $0.02: I agree with @Ryan. That flag is reserved for obscenity, personal attacks on other users, and the like. It's not appropriate for non-obscene filler text that any user can easily remove, especially if it's the first time the author has done this. – elixenide Dec 29 '17 at 21:08
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    I would edit the post into better shape, and then vote on the end result. How it got there, or who posted it is irrelevant. – Nisse Engström Jan 2 '18 at 20:33
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I think the FAQ is quite clear:

What makes something rude or abusive and when should I flag it?

...

  • Abuse of the system or community is everything that is created with the intention to harm them. This includes posts that contain no useful content at all ...

Yes, posting this filler text was a deliberate action, but (unlike the obfuscated code in the other question) not a deliberate action to harm the system or community; they were just trying to get their question posted. The filler text itself isn't rude either.

Also, the question you linked to contains some useful content, or at the very least, some content posted in good faith. While it does show up (for 10k users) as rude/abusive, that's normal for posts with pending red flags which are deleted (i.e. not flagged) by ♦ moderators. This also means the 100 reputation penalty hasn't been applied to the user.

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    Agree 100%. A 100 rep penalty is very severe for someone who is just trying to ask a question and adds filler text. – psubsee2003 Dec 29 '17 at 22:14

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