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You can resize image size in SE as instructed in the post how-to-reduce-image-size-on-stack-overflow. I often make pictures square small by appending picture urls by s, and preserve second link for the original size such that you can click the image for the full size image. However, I have observed that it can be difficult for new users to note that those square small pictures are clickable.

Feature-request: add small orange triangle at the top-left corner of small square images to indicate for opening the original size of the image. Current guideline

s: small   square     90×90   (forced)
b: big     square     160×160 (forced)
t: small   thumbnail  160×160
m: medium  thumbnail  320×320
l: large   thumbnail  640×640
h: huge    thumbnail  1024×1024

Proposal if simple s is kept without indicative icon

ss: small with icon square 90x90 (forced)
s: small   square     90×90   (forced)
b: big     square     160×160 (forced)
t: small   thumbnail  160×160
m: medium  thumbnail  320×320
l: large   thumbnail  640×640
h: huge    thumbnail  1024×1024
2

I disagree. First of, a small orange triangle doesn't indicate anything and will not be recognized by even a small minority to indicate this feature. Even more so, when people do not understand that clicking an image enlarges it they will not get this symbol. If we would like to have this done it should be more explicit.

However, I also see really no need to do this. First of, I can't really believe that so many user would miss this, so I searched for some question were you did this, e.g. this one: How to show every second R ggplot2 x-axis label value?

To me, it is obvious that the images are far too small to read anything so I expect them to be enlargable. So hovering over them immediately confirms this. I doubt an orange triangle would make this easier, because I would have no idea what it means. Probably I would assume it is part of the picture.

And as a final thought: In my opinion this is not a really nice usage. I really don't see the point of making images so small you can't see anything an them. To understand the question I will have to click them to see anything (if I don't need the pictures, don't include them), so instead of having reasonably-sized pictures and the text all at once I will now have to switch back and forth between the text and the enlarged version of the pictures. To me that seems way more cumbersome and I think the practice should be discouraged.

  • Yes, I think you can be right. What would be the optimum size of images if you have many them such that not to overload the body? - - I benchmark the image size to Nature standards nature.com/articles/s41534-017-0027-1 where they do not use so small images, but I think have seen somewhere sometimes there. – Léo Léopold Hertz 준영 Aug 1 '17 at 20:40
  • 2
    Well, it depends on the information you want to present. The image should be large enough to present the information. I think Nature shows it quite successfully, I can see everything in the small images, i.e. one obvious indicator should be if there is text on the image I should be able to read it. But of course, if I want to see the absolute details e.g. in Figure 5 to look were the spike exactly is it is totally fine having to enlarge. – dirkk Aug 1 '17 at 20:46
  • But also: I think you can hardly ever overload the body with images. I mean, it is the internet, we are not going to run out of space. And people can and will simply scroll. Especially with images, if I am not interested or don't need the information it is quite easy to scroll past them. It is sometimes different with a wall of text, but I can't remember having ever seen a SO question with too many or too large pictures. – dirkk Aug 1 '17 at 20:48

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