6

If you frequent Meta, you've probably seen a few posts addressing the need to improve the "How to Ask" page. Cody Gray's question prompted a wizard approach, while the mods are also discussing a mentorship approach. Each one has several pros and cons, and I'd like to suggest some form of middle ground.

I propose we create a few sample "bad questions". These are questions which have that ability to be good questions, but with several common mistakes in the way (the title's misleading, the code is formatted wrong, it doesn't say what behavior they expect).

When a new user moves to that chat room to learn how to formulate a question, they (the user and mentor) get an available sample question and fix it up together. If the new user still doesn't understand, they move to another sample question.

Addressing wizard and mentorship pros

The main pro to the wizard approach (in my opinion) is that it breaks up the tutorial so a new user isn't faced with a huge wall of text all at once; they only address one component at a time. I believe this approach preserves that pro.

The main pro to the mentorship approach (again, opinion) is that a user gets to ask a wider array of questions. This is certainly still preserved.

Addressing wizard and mentorship cons

The main con to an exclusively wizard approach is its rigidity. If a user doesn't understand the way the wizard explains tags, well.. that's too bad. We could link to more descriptive pages if they need, but at the end of the day there's only so much flexibility pre-selected text can have. Obviously, having a mentor eliminates this con.

Another con to a strictly wizard approach is that there's no way to stop a new user from just clicking "ok" at every step without reading. Obviously, that could still happen with a mentor, but having an actual human on the other side makes it less likely (I'd hope).

The main cons to an exclusively mentorship approach are that there's simply too much variability in what a user can say, and that it's likely they'll just ask the mentor to answer their main question. By providing stock "templates", it dramatically reduces the scope of questions a user might have, and also reduces the chance a new user might think this is the appropriate time to ask their original question.

Ideally, these sample questions would be locked except for mentors (or some other existing feature. The idea is to not need to dramatically overhaul any functionality, but I'm too much of a newbie to know the best approach for that), so noone could downvote/close/comment on them (unless there should be some bad comments too as part of the tutorial).

If mentorship in general gets shot down, I think this still is not a bad way to address a more wizard-based approach. Hopefully some flexibility could be kept with an option like, "I still don't understand. Show me another question." Or perhaps, "I still don't understand how to make a good title." would link to a title-specific sample.

  • When a new user moves to that chat room to learn how to formulate a question - I think that bit of text at the top has sneakily snuck away from it's rightful place under addressing mentorship? – Gimby Jul 28 '17 at 17:36
  • @Gimby well I made this post in response to the criticisms I saw to the mentorship approach. That was the general idea for opening up a chat with a mentor, and I didn't think reinventing that was my place. This also wasn't meant as a strict response for just mentorship, so I didn't feel an answer was the right place to put this. – Lord Farquaad Jul 28 '17 at 17:38
  • 1
    The main "pro" of a wizard is that it does what the user wants: it writes the particular question for the user. The mentor, on the other hand, tries to do something that the user at best does not care about: it teaches the user how to write a good question. The mentors will face an uphill battle... – Arkadiy Jul 28 '17 at 19:33
5

I propose we create a few sample "bad questions". These are questions which have that ability to be good questions, but with several common mistakes in the way (the title's misleading, the code is formatted wrong, it doesn't say what behavior they expect).

This might be a good resource to add to the existing How to Ask documentation, but I don't know if it's right for the mentorship program. When people have a question to ask, they just want to post their question now and get an answer. The problem I see with a wizard (and it's the same problem with the current How to Ask documentation) is that people might see this as an unnecessary hoop to jump through on their way to what they really want.

I think it would be better to let people post a draft of their own question when they go into the mentorship chat room, that way they have their own example that they care about to work on with a mentor, instead of some "boilerplate" example question that they care nothing about.

  • 2
    That's a really good point about the new users not caring about the "boilerplate" questions. I guess, then, are we more interested in teaching new users who want an answer immediately, or new users who want to learn how to contribute better to SO? It seems to me that any approach we try is unlikely to reach the former, so I was looking at a way to reach the latter. Considering, what you said, I agree a draft is a better approach with mentorship. – Lord Farquaad Jul 28 '17 at 17:44
  • 1
    @LordFarquaad Also consider which group is bigger, and which group is already well served by the current How to Ask guidelines. – Bill the Lizard Jul 28 '17 at 17:47
  • I don't disagree with what you're saying, but I do think the size of the group is less important than the reachable size of the group. I'd be better served teaching an English lesson in England than in China, despite the fact there's way fewer people in England. But I do agree the "eager to learn" group already has resources available to them. – Lord Farquaad Jul 28 '17 at 17:51
  • If the boilerplate questions set 'boolean' flags that were displayed with the question, then 'click through' would be detectable: "Hey - this OP clicked 'OK' to 'did you include any error messages', but just says 'I got an error' in the question - gonna close-vote it!" Or maybe - "gonna send it to mentors". Myself, I would send it to /dev/null – Martin James Jul 28 '17 at 18:20

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .