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Earlier today, I gave this answer to a question.

I also went through the rest of the answers and found one that had incomplete content. Although he had some explanation at the top, the code snippet was just a copy of the OPs (from the question). I downvoted that answer, and left a comment to the user to fix his answer.

The user's reaction was to downvote my answer and accuse me of copying his. After downvoting my answer, he deleted his answer and all his comments.

What can I do in such cases? (I didn't find any better place to report this behavior.)

marked as duplicate by cs95, Michael Gaskill, Sagar V, M D, Thomas Ayoub Jul 31 '17 at 7:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    If they've deleted their answer and comments you can always flag your own answer for moderator attention and explain what has happened. – George Jul 28 '17 at 9:48
  • Thanks, @George, Could you please post this as an answer, so I can mark as accepted? This question starts to get some attention. – beerwin Jul 28 '17 at 9:51
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    What do you want us or a moderator to do? I hope the comment exchange was a bit friendlier then Incomplete answer. which is a comment you left but I find that hardly constructive. Not saying that the response should be revenge in that case but it is online a bit harder to fix a fresh interaction when it already derailed at the start. – rene Jul 28 '17 at 9:53
  • Fortunately the comment exchange was cut short when the user in question has deleted his answer. My only response to his action is still up in the comment to his below my answer. I admit, that my language could have been better. By the time I clicked the send button, his answer and comments were gone. – beerwin Jul 28 '17 at 9:58
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    Well, that is nice then. You inflicted rage on a user on now on top of all that you call them out on Meta. I don't know ... let's see what a moderator will make out of this. – rene Jul 28 '17 at 10:02
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    @rene You inflicted rage on a user by asking them to fix a low-quality answer? I can't see the deleted answer/comments so I can't say they didn't but from what I can gather from what OP has said it didn't seem like they inflicted rage on a user. – George Jul 28 '17 at 10:04
  • @George In the comment I see there wasn't a question, just a blunt observation. – rene Jul 28 '17 at 10:06
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    I don't know about rage, but there was certainly nothing rational about their response to beerwin. – BoltClock Jul 28 '17 at 10:07
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    I don't think pointing a finger at a user publicly in a meta post was the best behaviour either (my opinion though. I just think that such matters should be handled as privately as possible, as an audience does seldom make the situation better). I think stepping away for a moment helps already a lot. You can still flag for a moderator after a break and thinking things through. – Rhayene Jul 28 '17 at 11:03
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    This seems to be the other answer (screenshot): i.stack.imgur.com/ccwWp.png @George – Josh Caswell Jul 28 '17 at 12:05
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    You deal with it. Getting downvoted is part of being on SO. – tom redfern Jul 28 '17 at 14:08
  • Live and let live. – Shark Jul 30 '17 at 10:40
  • "The user's reaction was to downvote my answer and accuse me of copying his." Probably. You can't know that. In fact, even moderators can't know that. You have no idea who downvoted, just who commented. I've frequently posted a comment on an answer at the same time someone else voted on it, and been falsely associated with the vote (either way) by the person posting the answer. If you assume you know who voted, you'll be wrong at least as often -- probably more often -- than right. And with downvotes, it just leads to bad feeling. :-) Ignore it and move on. – T.J. Crowder Jul 31 '17 at 7:44
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If they've deleted their answer and comments you can always flag your own answer for moderator attention and explain what has happened as they will be able to look at the deleted items.

That way a moderator can look into the situation and judge for themselves. I would say this kind of "abuse"(?) would warrant moderator interaction as even if you annoy someone downvoting based on the user and not the actual answer is wrong.

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    What should the moderator do then? Reverse the votes? Undelete the answer? Message the user not be pissed of when they feel someone took a part of their answer for their own benefit? – rene Jul 28 '17 at 9:57
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    I think, that a verbal reminder would suffice in this case, unless the user keeps exhibiting this behavior. After I have posted this question, someone has undone the downvote. The answer and comments are still deleted, And IMHO they should stay that way, as they are not contributing with anything good to this site. I'm going to delete my own comment to keep the site clean of this clash. – beerwin Jul 28 '17 at 10:02
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    @rene: Or just make a mental note of the situation and those involved. – BoltClock Jul 28 '17 at 10:08
  • @BoltClock how many mental notes are there between you and the other mods? Or do you mean you would annotate both the profiles? – rene Jul 28 '17 at 10:11
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    @rene: No, not annotate them. This is minor in the grand scheme of things. But we'll probably recognize the usernames next time we come across them and go "huh, so it's the same fellow I read about on meta / someone else flagged in the past". If a user has a pattern of retaliating with downvotes, that's when we'll consider taking action. – BoltClock Jul 28 '17 at 10:14
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    You (or even the moderator) can't even know that it was that user that voted, and you can't know why they voted (you can only guess). There is nothing for a moderator to do here; you're just wasting their time by flagging the post. – Servy Jul 28 '17 at 17:25
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I downvoted the answer and left a comment to the user to fix his answer.

Well, there's where you went wrong.

Not the downvoting part—that was correct—but the commenting part. When you leave a comment to accompany a downvote, you risk becoming a target of the extreme emotional rage some users experience upon receiving a downvote. That obviously happened in this case.

Maybe this could have been avoided if you would have left a more polite, constructive comment than "Incomplete answer", but that's no guarantee. This is why it is generally recommended that you not leave comments to accompany downvotes.

Rather than stopping to reconsider his answer, the other user decided to go on a rampage, lashing out at you and downvoting your answer. Eventually, it seems he came to his senses and deleted his answer, but still didn't undo his downvote.

Unfortunately, there isn't anything that anyone can do about that downvote. Users have the legal right to downvote however they want, so long as they don't engage in vote fraud. And a single instance of an unwarranted downvote is not vote fraud. Had he gone on a downvoting spree with several of your answers, that would have been automatically rolled back. A downvote on a single answer won't be. You have my sympathies, but ultimately you'll just have to shrug it off as a learning experience.

  • Did you check the deleted answer before you wrote this answer? – rene Jul 28 '17 at 10:04
  • I did. The answer has not yet been edited. – beerwin Jul 28 '17 at 10:05
  • No, @rene, but I did now. What was I supposed to see there? It does seem like an attempt was made to answer (the text part), but the code snippet doesn't have anything to do with that, so it wasn't really a good answer. – Cody Gray Jul 28 '17 at 10:05
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    @rene, Your point is understandable, I will try to be more polite next time and/or not leave any comment. – beerwin Jul 28 '17 at 10:10
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    I mean, you can't win either way. Sometimes I leave comments specifically to give the user a target - some users are known to pick someone or something to downvote, be it the question, somebody else's answer, etc, even when I was the one who downvoted their answer. Scapegoating is a very real issue when dealing with such behavior. – BoltClock Jul 28 '17 at 10:21
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    @Cody Gray: The converse has happened to me - I've been scapegoated just because I happened to have a competing answer, even when I never voted on, or worse, I upvoted, their answer. You win some, you lose some. – BoltClock Jul 28 '17 at 10:23
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    @gnat I thought sympathy votes were a myth because Jeff Atwood said so – Andrew Myers Jul 28 '17 at 17:08
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    and got downvoted for nothing @gnat - The people who think that way still think that even when there are comments left. Meta has posts claiming a question was down voted for no reason despite multiple old comments explaining what was wrong with the original question. – BSMP Jul 28 '17 at 17:41
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    -1 for "This is why it is generally recommended that you not leave comments to accompany downvotes." – Cœur Jul 30 '17 at 10:18
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    @Cœur even Shog9 has said we shouldn't explain downvotes. What you can (should?) do is comment if you think the answer can be improved. There is a huge difference, especially in the tone of the post. Explaining a downvote is a negative comment. Suggesting improvements is a positive comment. – psubsee2003 Jul 30 '17 at 11:39
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    @psubsee2003 and I disagree with this self-restriction of not commenting. Giving explanations is a step for improvement. It is part of communication. People should help by giving comments. – Cœur Jul 30 '17 at 11:47
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    @psubsee2003: That distinction is irrelevant in practice. When a comment and a downvote appear at the same time, most recipients are invariably going to associate the two with each other. I've seen many cases of users responding to positive comments with "you could have just commented and not downvoted", and then it's on us to explain to them either 1) why we downvoted, or 2) that they can't assume the same person who left the comment also cast the downvote. Again, there's no winning here. – BoltClock Jul 31 '17 at 6:17
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    I disagree with not commenting while downvoting. I personally find it intensely frustrating when I get downvoted with no explanation. I usually comment explaining why I downvoted when I downvote, but I also try to be polite and offer ways to correct the issue so it's not purely criticism. The OP's comment was waaaaay too short and unhelpful, so I don't have a huge amount of sympathy. – Clonkex Jul 31 '17 at 7:00
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    @PeterDuniho: So? Just because there may be a bad apple or two in the bunch we should forego feedback entirely? How is that going to make the site better? And remember, if you don't want to criticize when you downvote, then you should avoid criticizing at all, since if you do criticize and someone else downvotes you may get the heat for them! I'm sorry, but I'd rather weather the rage of a few nutbolts than stop providing feedback on questions or answers: I'll downvote and comment, because I think it's the best way to improve quality. – Matthieu M. Jul 31 '17 at 8:17
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    @PeterDuniho I do have the right to expect a comment; doesn't mean I'll get one (I say that with a chuckle). However given that this site is all about learning, it seems counter-productive to just say "that's wrong or not useful" without explaining how "that's wrong or not useful". That said, I don't always comment (especially if there's already a comment there). I just try to do it when I think I can sufficiently well explain what's wrong. And finally, I've never really seen someone retaliate for a downvote+comment, so I reserve the right to change my mind on this topic at a later date ;) – Clonkex Jul 31 '17 at 12:59

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