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I'm a fan of recent the comment-flag union: there's now just one button I need to hit for most of the comments I end up flagging. Instead of deciding between "Obsolete" and "We never really needed this +1 THANKS SO MUCH comment to begin with", I can just flag them both as "No longer needed".

But I've noticed recently that when I flag a comment as "No longer needed", sometimes the comment is removed instantly, and the flag is marked as "helpful" instantly in my profile. I don't remember this ever happening before the union - is this something new?

At first glance it sounds like Why do comment flags sometimes take immediate effect?, but that question's answer talks about obscenity. The comments I've been flagging haven't been obscene or begging for upvotes or whatever, as that answer suggests could be the cause. The most recent one was just something like "Thanks for your help": polite but obviously useless to any future visitors referred by Google. Is there perhaps a regex like the obscenity detector that detects "useless noise" in comments to expedite their deletion?

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    So you ask if this is a new feature, and then link to a 3 year old post explaining the feature... – Servy Jul 25 '17 at 17:52
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    As I said, it doesn't actually seem like the feature I linked to, which specifically is about obscenity. I linked to that question to make it clear that (a) I'd done some research on my own, and (b) I don't think my question is a duplicate of that one even though at first glance it might seem to be. – amalloy Jul 25 '17 at 17:53
  • You asked if the instant acceptance of a flag was a new feature, and then linked to a 3 year old question describing the instance acceptance of a flag and giving one example of a situation that triggers it. It doesn't say that only obscenities are checked for (and of course even if it did, that still wouldn't make this a new feature). – Servy Jul 25 '17 at 17:57
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    Linking to a post to demonstrate that you've done your research when the post that you link to answers your question does indeed demonstrate that you've done your research, but then asking the question despite already having found your answer is even more of a problem then not having done your research to begin with, because you know the answer and asked the question anyway. – Servy Jul 25 '17 at 17:58
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    @Servy He has not already found his answer, even after having done his research, which is the perfect reason to ask a question. That link is about obscenities, as evidenced by the answer: "you flagged three comments that used variants on a particular obscenity. The system automatically deletes comments made like that, without needing the intervention of a moderator." The definition of "like that" sounds like it just means obscenities, and amalloy wanted to know about things that weren't obscenities. – Davy M Jul 28 '17 at 2:49
  • @DavyM Yes, the link does answer that question. The question said that it was completely surprised that a flag would be immediately accepted as soon as it was flagged, and was wondering if a new feature was just added that automatically accepts flags immediately. The question then links to a post explaining that the feature has existed for years, so it does answer their question that the feature isn't new and that it's existed for years. The question wasn't, "was this feature just changed to delete new content besides obscenities". That would be a question not answered by the duplicate. – Servy Jul 28 '17 at 13:17
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    @Servy The OP says: At first glance it sounds like Why do comment flags sometimes take immediate effect?, but that question's answer talks about obscenity. The comments I've been flagging haven't been obscene or begging for upvotes or whatever, as that answer suggests could be the cause. The most recent one was just something like "Thanks for your help": polite but obviously useless to any future visitors referred by Google. So yes, he is asking if there is some new feature (Or new functionality if you will) that deletes new content besides obscenities. – Davy M Jul 28 '17 at 13:21
  • Take note that he is expressly showing that there are other times besides what was previously mentioned, then asks Is this something new? . That doesn't mean that the whole "resolving instantly" is new, rather, that he is asking when the instant resolving happens, and points out a case when it appears new. – Davy M Jul 28 '17 at 13:28
  • @DavyM Right from the question, "But I've noticed recently that when I flag a comment as "No longer needed", sometimes the comment is removed instantly, and the flag is marked as "helpful" instantly in my profile. I don't remember this ever happening before the union - is this something new?" So they felt that there was never a time that a comment would be deleted instantly, and thought that this was new, and then linked to a post demonstrating that it's a feature that's been around for years. – Servy Jul 28 '17 at 13:35
  • @DavyM And of course, as mentioned, the other answer just gives obscenities as an example of one thing that triggers the instant deletion, not as a statement that it's the only thing, so even then that post still answers the question. – Servy Jul 28 '17 at 13:38
  • @Servy It is very common to present information in the order you found it. He thought it was new, then recognized his first glance, found more information that wasn't complete, and asked a new question to complete the information to find out what was new. The other question asked a question, and the person gave an answer, without indicating that there were any other reasons outside of foul language that triggers an insta-delete. Unless you count the maybe it depends on how hard I click the mouse button – Davy M Jul 28 '17 at 13:54
  • @DavyM Again, since they'd found the answer to their question elsewhere the solution would be to then not ask the question answered by that question, given that they already had an answer. Asking a question that you already know the answer to, only to then go in comments and get mad at people for stating that they already knew the answer, and asking a new question in the comments, it's better to just ask the actual question that they really have in the question, rather than asking a question they know the answer to and asking their real question as a follow up later. – Servy Jul 28 '17 at 13:59
  • @Servy Quite obviously the OP didn't find the answer to their question because he chose to ask a new question. And he didn't appear to be angry in his reply, but perhaps you perceived that because you knew your first comment was meant to be sarcastic. – Davy M Jul 28 '17 at 15:30
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    @DavyM If they didn't find an answer to their question then they should have actually asked a question they didn't have an answer to, rather than asking a question they already knew the answer to, just because they had also thought of some other question that they didn't have an answer to that they choose not to ask. My comment also wasn't sarcastic, it was explaining that the question contains it's own answer, that's...not sarcasm. – Servy Jul 28 '17 at 15:32
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Yes, there are a few expressions that catch common patterns that aren't really off-putting so much as they are annoying in bulk. These vary a bit by site, but "thanks" is active most places - it's nice to be thanked, but once you've seen it - and especially when these comments sit around pushing out more informative comments - then it's handy to be rid of them without involving a moderator.

Right now, these expressions are few and fairly conservative; now that we've finally done the flag-revamp I'm hoping to ramp up the coverage here quite a bit in the coming months.

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    This shows that a comment was deleted by a single flag. Is that expected? – NathanOliver Jul 31 '17 at 17:11
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    Yes it is, @Nathan – Shog9 Jul 31 '17 at 17:12
  • OK. Just didn't know if a single flag was intentional. – NathanOliver Jul 31 '17 at 17:13

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