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Just putting this up moreso because it created an interesting dilemma than because I was personally involved...

There were a few people who voted to delete my answers to the 2017 Moderator Election Questionnaire. I just wanted to bring this up in Meta because I think this might be a process that needs to be reevaluated. I'm not so sure that a potential moderator's answers should ever be deleted, because that removes their voice from the election and reduces the information for voters to make an informed decision.

Should the "Delete" vote button be removed from election questionnaires, or can the process somehow be revamped so that delete votes aren't allowed or counted on questionnaires? I don't really have a well-thought-out opinion on the best way to handle it at the moment, which is why I'm opening this up for discussion.

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  • 5
    related: Are we abusing our delete votes on Meta?
    – gnat
    Jul 20, 2017 at 19:46
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    I upvoted because this is a good question that deserves attention, but I disagree with the suggested course of action. The current policy of voiding delete votes is fine.
    – user4639281
    Jul 20, 2017 at 20:15
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    I would make for a decent moderator questionnaire entry. What would you do? Hopefully nobody gets stumped about it, one quicky mod intervention avoids ten more stone tablets. Jul 20, 2017 at 22:10
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    I just want to know what they were thinking. I've seen answers in the Low Quality queue that were clearly just flagged because someone disagreed with the answer but this is a new kind of ridiculous.
    – BSMP
    Jul 20, 2017 at 22:20
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    @BSMP One user who voted to delete left a comment (since removed): "I voted to delete the nomination, for mercy. Since I see this is a downvote-magnet and wanted to help the candidate get out of it."
    – user6655984
    Jul 21, 2017 at 0:43

2 Answers 2

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The questionnaire process is pretty casual - the system doesn't treat it any differently from any other meta question, so the rules that exist (only candidates can answer, candidates must answer the questions that were selected, etc) are all enforced manually.

This goes for deletion (and other voting) as well. Under normal circumstances, there's no particular reason for anyone to vote on these answers at all - it has no direct effect on the outcome of the election. But we don't have a way to disable it while still allowing answers to be posted, edited, commented on, etc.

So, we tend to just let folks cast up/down votes as they please... But delete votes will be overridden as long as a given answer is from a currently-running candidate.

At some point in the future, we may build in more elaborate support for these questionnaires, at which point it might be worth disabling voting (including vote-to-delete).

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    Yeah, I was bringing this up more for future elections as I'm pretty sure no one will do that again this election cycle. Jul 20, 2017 at 19:35
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    If the last paragraph comes to fruition then maybe even disable editing except by OP (similar to nomination posts)?
    – Jon Clements Mod
    Jul 20, 2017 at 19:35
  • @Jon Is that something that has caused a problem in the past?
    – user4639281
    Jul 20, 2017 at 20:05
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    @TinyGiant nope - not that I'm aware. But then, I don't believe delete votes have caused an issue previously either. I see three cases for editing - 1) to correct typos/grammar, 2) to change the meaning of part of the answer and 3) to vandalise it. For 1) and 2) - that should be down to the OP - what they've said and how they've said it (warts and all) -- after all - if you're factually wrong/incoherent/can't run a spell checker etc... that kind of gives an impression of the candidate's character which could be masked by helpful community edits...
    – Jon Clements Mod
    Jul 20, 2017 at 20:22
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    ... and 3) is clearly unwanted. That doesn't leave any good reason for the community to be able to edit the answers...
    – Jon Clements Mod
    Jul 20, 2017 at 20:23
  • @Jon Interesting point about the impression of character, though I've corrected (or have seen corrected) some typos and spelling mistakes in regular posts from prolific meta users and moderators alike, so while it may be an indicator, I don't think that is a good indicator. (unless of course the entire post is filled with typos).
    – user4639281
    Jul 20, 2017 at 21:29
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    These questionnaire answers should really just be integrated into the nominations. The only advantage that I can see of having them on Meta is that it allows people to express their opinions by voting, but that's more properly done during the primary phase anyway. If it's an issue of too much data on one page, then make the answers collapsible per-candidate.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jul 21, 2017 at 6:53
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Suppose a candidate decides to post a really offensive picture in their questionnaire, or links to a site that runs really offensive ads. Or worse, they decided to fill their entire nomination with garbage text that even the most disciplined of editors wouldn't be able to touch with a 24-karat golden keyboard to edit with. Not being able to delete them means that moderation of the most natural kind can't happen.

Alternatively, what if they want to withdraw? If they can't delete their post, then their nomination hangs in a very strange state and only serves as noise to the other nominees.

I do think that this issue was taken care of in that a moderator should be able to override the community's delete votes. It seems odd that the community doesn't want to know where you stand on these issues. In the future, flagging a moderator would be the best way to go about this.

(To anyone that says that they disagree; yeah, that's what the downvotes were for. Removing it says you just don't care.)

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    Perhaps a flag is more appropriate than a delete, then? I'm not saying I disagree with you, I'm just putting it out there that in an election it might be better to ensure the mods are involved in the decision. Thoughts? Jul 20, 2017 at 19:25
  • For offensive content we have a flag for that which will nuke it. The links can be edited out. Jul 20, 2017 at 19:25
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    @NathanOliver: I'll say that was the first example I pulled off the top of my head. I could go deeper and more in-detail if you like, such that those flags wouldn't be readily applicable.
    – Makoto
    Jul 20, 2017 at 19:26
  • @JohnnyBones: I've not seen nominees' posts deleted by the community at large, but you did just remind me of another angle...
    – Makoto
    Jul 20, 2017 at 19:27
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    As a moderator I can just delete then undelete to clear the delete votes. This is just what bluefeet did, in fact, and she left a comment addressing the delete voter.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    Jul 20, 2017 at 19:27
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    @MartijnPieters: Yes, I've seen that power before. That's more along the lines of what I think would be appropriate anyway, since adding the infrastructure to handle what is clearly an exceptional case isn't worth it IMO.
    – Makoto
    Jul 20, 2017 at 19:29
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    That's the key point: moderator elections happen so infrequently that it isn't really worth developer time to implement a special-case question type to handle this. Flags to moderators can deal with seriously misguided delete votes like this, if they happen. It's common for moderators to step in when people misuse delete votes to remove Meta answers they disagree with, and this is a similar situation.
    – Brad Larson Mod
    Jul 20, 2017 at 19:35
  • I agree SE do not need to develop anything and it can even be useful to delete some content, however to me delete voting a serious candiate's answer (because there is a delete button and/or you don't like the answer) is non respectful to the candiate and abusive to the community, this according to me should be made more clearly in your post for future elections. Jul 20, 2017 at 21:02
  • These are really more of an edge case situation that could be dealt with like any normal QA moderation duties. Voting to delete a perfectly reasonable submission just because you don't agree with it however, that's a bit more sinister.
    – DavidG
    Jul 21, 2017 at 12:29

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