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The election announcement states:

Our general criteria for moderators are as follows:

  • patient and fair
  • leads by example
  • shows respect for their fellow community members in their actions and words
  • open to some light but firm moderation to keep the community on track and resolve (hopefully) uncommon disputes and exceptions

In my own experience with Stack Overflow (which changed over the last years from "wow, fantastic" to "wtf") I would tend to vote for those nominees which showed patient and fair, leadership by example and showed respect.

Therefore personally I would vote for those where I can see what they have downvoted (and provided a reason for, no anonymous downvotes). They voted for closing questions that were justified.

More and more often I stumble across questions which were closed for no reason. Well, reasons told: not a meaningful question, duplicate of X,....

More and more often those questions are no duplicates of others (because some important detail is different). Sometimes they are duplicates but the other question was asked years later.

More and more often those questions are closed as not meaningful. They were asked in one or two sentences but perfectly and fully described the problem. Example (It is one method call in c# and if you need to cancel this task you understand the question).

So, is there a way to see the behaviour of the nominees in the past in order to evaluate it? This may improve to elect moderators which make Stack Overflow great again and not a nightmare of unanswered closed questions with a bunch of unexplained anonymous downvotes.

closed as too broad by TylerH, HaveNoDisplayName, Sagar V, Toto, EJoshuaS - Reinstate Monica Jul 24 '17 at 18:34

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    are you talking about voting behaviour as in upvote/downvote or close voting of posts? Voting behaviour is anonymous – Suraj Rao Jul 20 '17 at 6:26
  • Well, "patient", "fair", "justified" - Those are subjective term, and what you think is fair doesn't must make it fair. You can cast your vote if you think a question should be reopened, you can upvote a question that you think is good. – Alon Eitan Jul 20 '17 at 6:34
  • @suraj I am talking about both. But voting shouldn't be anonymous and shouldn't be able to do without providing a reason. And although it is anonymous SO knows who voted for what (you can't vote multiple times the for the same question/answer). A provided statisti for the nominees would help (e.g. 500 downvotes, 5% without reason) – monty Jul 20 '17 at 6:37
  • @AlonEitan well at least one can see that it isn't fair if the question describes the problem but is closed as not meaningful or closed as duplicate of a question posted later on (which should be prevented by SO design anyway) – monty Jul 20 '17 at 6:44
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    But we close/downvote questions that show lack of effort and research on behalf of the OP (duplicate, too broad, missing MCVE, etc) Some guidelines must be followed when asking a question here. I don't need others to judge me based on my voting patterns, and I won't provide a reason for any lame question that I downvote. And I certainly don't expect a moderator to do it as well – Alon Eitan Jul 20 '17 at 6:47
  • @AlonEitan So this question/discussion is a duplicate or researched badly? Count the downvotes received during the first 30 minutes.... :-) – monty Jul 20 '17 at 6:50
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    @monty NO - On Meta we upvote questions that we like/agree with, and downvoted questions that we don't. Voting is different on Meta and does not affect on your overall reputation – Alon Eitan Jul 20 '17 at 6:52
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    Moderators do not have 'supervotes'; their up and downvotes count no more or less than any other community members. How a moderator votes is of no more concern to anyone else as how a regular member votes. Moderators do see the underbelly of SO exposed much more than regular members perhaps do, so it is normal for moderators to downvote more once elected. I fail to see how someone's voting behaviour tells you how they'd act fair and patient and respectful when having to deal with a confilct or when dealing with plagiarism accusations or the actual work that a moderator has to perform. – Martijn Pieters Jul 20 '17 at 7:48
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    The aggregate voting behaviour is public, right there on everyone's profile. I'd be far more worried about those numbers than individual votes. If someone never downvotes, that'd be a huge red flag to me. Don't they want to deal with bad content? Are they afraid of confrontation? Same for no upvotes. – Martijn Pieters Jul 20 '17 at 7:50
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    As for close votes: those are public once a post is closed. If there are controversial closes, perhaps look at how someone then handles the controversy, that's far more important than the voting itself. – Martijn Pieters Jul 20 '17 at 7:51
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    In 6 years you didn't learn enough about SO and Meta.so to have this position ? Seems you didn't search either to be surprised by the voting pattern on meta. Asking for a change with so few knowledge on a community sounds just a rant over something you don't like but not something constructive at all. – Tensibai Jul 20 '17 at 7:51
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    I must say Thanks for finding this exemple. It was in my standard for Anonymous downvote, vote close, and hope for a deletion. But now it's gone! If you have any other controversial close vote for no reason of the same quality may you make a list? – Drag and Drop Jul 20 '17 at 8:08
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    with a bunch of unexplained anonymous downvotes 1) You need to have this conversation with the people who cast revenge down votes and/or leave nasty, insulting comments when someone does critique their post. 2) If you don't think the close reasons adequately explain why a question was closed, why do you think comments for downvoting or closing will work better? – BSMP Jul 20 '17 at 14:22
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    Sometimes they are duplicates but the other question was asked years later. The point of marking something as a duplicate is to get users to the best version of the Q&A. It doesn't matter which one was asked first, it matters which one has the better answer(s). Sometimes the older one never got answered. Note that getting marked as duplicate isn't a bad thing if the dupe target was hard to find (or didn't exist at the time the question was voted). – BSMP Jul 20 '17 at 14:26
  • There have been a lot of proposals to require people to explain downvotes (I had one awhile back which was, ironically enough, downvoted into oblivion). I'm not a big fan of "downvote and run" - if I'm the first person to downvote, I'll almost always comment explaining why (or at least point them to the documentation on how to improve their question if they're new users). With that said, I've cast thousands of votes (around 10,000, actually, in a mix of downvotes, upvotes, and close votes) - if you really want to go through my entire history to evaluate how many of them were fair, have fun. – EJoshuaS - Reinstate Monica Jul 24 '17 at 18:41
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Therefore personally I would vote for those where I can see what they have downvoted (and provided a reason for, no anonymous downvotes).

To respond to that, animuson said in a recent post:

Being a moderator, or, in this case, a candidate to be a moderator, does not mean that their anonymity in voting should cease to exist.

So, no. You're not going to be able to see what they have downvoted. You can't see what a person has downvoted when they're not a moderator, and you can't see what they've downvoted when they are a moderator. Why should you get that data in between?


They voted for closing questions that were justified.

Well the most you'll be able to do here is see what they've reviewed in the various queues. Go to the "reviews" tab in a user's profile.

For the same reason as above, you won't be able to see close votes outside of review queues.


More and more often I stumble across questions which were closed for no reason. Well, reasons told: not a meaningful question, duplicate of X,....

Questions are closed for a reason. There is text in the yellow box that says why something is closed, or a comment below if it's a custom reason.

But let's look at some data. Here is a (poorly optimized) query I whipped up and the resulting graph. For the past 2 years, the slope of the "ClosedQuestions" line is similar to the slope of the "TotalQuestions" line. This means that while more questions are being closed every month, it is still the same percentage.

So no, "more and more" is incorrect in the grand scheme of things.


More and more often those questions are no duplicates of others (because some important detail is different).

So vote to reopen the question, or edit the post to make it more clear. Any edit made after the post is closed will put it in the Vote to Reopen queue.


Sometimes they are duplicates but the other question was asked years later.

It doesn't matter which question was earlier. The only thing that matters with closing as duplicate is that a question points to the more canonical source. If it happens to be posted later, so be it.


More and more often those questions are closed as not meaningful. They were asked in one or two sentences but perfectly and fully described the problem. Example (It is one method call in c# and if you need to cancel this task you understand the question).

Again, vote to reopen them or edit them into shape.

Also, are we still talking about moderator nominations or are we complaining about "unfairly" closed questions?


...and not a nightmare of unanswered closed questions

Let's turn to data again. Let's see how many questions are unanswered vs answered each month. Here's the query and the graph.

For the entire history of the site the percentage of unanswered questions has been low. There was a single large spike 11 months ago (which I'll need to research more to learn why), but overall unanswered questions don't seem a problem.

If you've got more evidence to support your theory, that would be a great meta post.

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    There's always a large decrease in unanswered questions ~12 months from when you run the query because the roomba deletes unanswered questions that are a year old (that meet certain criteria). – Servy Jul 24 '17 at 15:44
  • Yep, totally forgot about the roomba. That would explain the spike. Thanks. – gunr2171 Jul 24 '17 at 15:44
  • There is a sense in which the percent of unanswered question is slightly gamed by Roomba. – EJoshuaS - Reinstate Monica Jul 24 '17 at 18:47
  • Keep in mind that negatively-scored unanswered questions Roomba faster than a year. – EJoshuaS - Reinstate Monica Jul 24 '17 at 18:48

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