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In connection with the moderator elections, we are holding a Q&A thread for the candidates. Questions collected from an earlier thread have been compiled into this one, which shall now serve as the space for the candidates to provide their answers.

Not every question was compiled - as noted, we only selected the top 8 questions as submitted by the community, plus 2 pre-set questions from us. Today's selection is brought to you with a focus on dealing with negative feedback from users.

As a candidate, your job is simple - post an answer to this question, citing each of the questions and then post your answer to each question given in that same answer. For your convenience, I will include all of the questions in quote format with a break in between each, suitable for you to insert your answers. Just copy the whole thing after the first set of three dashes. Please consider putting your name at the top of your post so that readers will know who you are before they finish reading everything you have written, and also including a link to your answer on your nomination post.

Once all the answers have been compiled, this will serve as a transcript for voters to view the thoughts of their candidates, and will be appropriately linked in the Election page.

Good luck to all of the candidates!

Oh, and when you've completed your answer, please provide a link to it after this blurb here, before that set of three dashes. Please leave the list of links in the order of submission.

To save scrolling here are links to the submissions from each candidate (in order of submission):


  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

  2. Say you just performed a simple moderator action, like closing a question and leaving a comment explaining why. The question's owner disagrees with your decision, flags your comment as "no longer needed" and replies with a comment that should be flagged as "rude or abusive". Do you handle the situation yourself or do you wait for another mod to clean up? If you handle it yourself, do you just dismiss their flag, delete their comment and move on or do take further action?

  3. Someone uses a custom flag to ask for a question to be migrated to another site. You're not a member of the target site. How do you decide whether or not to migrate the question?

  4. Given a question that's closed as a duplicate of a fairly popular question (say a score of 10+, with multiple decent answers having a score of 5+), a gold tag badge user comes along, single-handedly reopens it and posts an answer that doesn't really differ that much from the ones in the duplicate. The answer or question is flagged by a user who disagrees with the reopening, stating the answer merely duplicates content already present on the site. What do you do?

  5. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

  6. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

  7. Moderators are expected to spend only 30 mins of their time, but we all know that 30 mins is insufficient. There are 2100 flags per day in the queue, a few of them needing 10~15 minutes. Most moderators spend way more than 30 mins and a few spend hours together. Would you be able to scale up your work time when the demand increases?

  8. Due to your status and actions as moderator and no matter how reasonable your conduct, you will be personally insulted more frequently, will have your competence questioned more publicly, and will be more exposed to negative sentiments. How will you cope with this negative pressure long-term when it comes from many users?

  9. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

  10. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

  • 3
    It might be useful to have candidates list their time-zones. People in central Russia may not see much help from a moderator on EST. (not to say candidate on EST are less qualified, just less useful from the voters perspective) – Toby Jul 24 '17 at 21:04
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    Time zones can be misleading, @Toby. I'm in US CST, but I'm not generally active during "normal business hours" in that time zone. Beyond that, why are time zones relevant? You aren't picking moderators to help you as an individual, you're picking moderators to help the site as a whole (i.e., do janitorial tasks). Does it really matter that the janitor works the same hours you do? Trash can be picked up at any time of the day or night, and everyone still benefits. You flag while you're awake, and your flags are magically cleared while you sleep! – Cody Gray Jul 25 '17 at 7:23
  • In answers to question 1, several candidates have already covered personal or trade-secret type information. I would also love to see candidates address other "commercial world" type issues, such as accidentally posting material that is already copyrighted under a different license (e.g.: employer's license, COTS vendor's license). – Ogre Psalm33 Jul 25 '17 at 12:38
  • 1
    @Ogre Wouldn't it be better to establish a community policy regarding those circumstances that all moderators would follow, rather than having each individual moderator decide for herself what to do? Part of the reason I say that is because I don't really know what I would do off the top of my head. I'd want to get input from others to make an informed decision. You should start a Meta question about it; use the discussion tag. – Cody Gray Jul 25 '17 at 15:43
  • @CodyGray Indeed. There already is such a question and discussion here: meta.stackoverflow.com/a/319061/13140 (and apparently a policy). This was perhaps my sly way of finding out who would do the leg-work and not just quickly dismiss the "question in question" with a canned answer. ;-) But since we're discussing it...cat's out of the bag! – Ogre Psalm33 Jul 25 '17 at 18:04
  • 1
    @Ogre That doesn't really seem applicable to the question you posed. It's talking about a slightly different circumstance, where the person tries to license code under a dual license. What you said was "accidentally posting material that is already copyrighted under a different license". That answer says, "You can absolutely post copyrighted material here as long as you don't violate somebody else's copyright", but doesn't say what should be done if a copyright was violated. My understanding is that mods aren't obligated to do anything; a DMCA takedown notice would need to be filed. – Cody Gray Jul 26 '17 at 7:07
  • And that would put the burden on the team that runs Stack Overflow. But the question still remains (at least, for me) of should a moderator do something, even if we are not legally required to do something. – Cody Gray Jul 26 '17 at 7:08
  • In evaluating the candidates - I could not find a single one with keywords like 'developer', 'java', 'python', etc in there own presentations. Curious. – YoYo Jul 28 '17 at 20:38
  • Also drilling down to the StackOverflow #tags on their profile, most of them seemed to be java script and c# developers, one php, one python, none java. This might be a reflection of actual community diversity, I am not sure. But I would have loved to see a better presentation of my own agenda... – YoYo Jul 28 '17 at 20:46
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    @YoYo It's not that curious if you consider the job of a moderator. You aren't electing someone to answer technical questions (although moderators can and do continue to do that); rather, you are electing someone to clean up garbage and step in to handle problems that regular users can't handle. You can assume that we are all software developers, but that isn't a relevant qualification for being a moderator here. Even still, there's more diversity than you think. You overlooked that 3 of us are C++ experts, for example. – Cody Gray Jul 30 '17 at 9:21
  • 1
    @YoYo I completely agree. There is a large Java presence on SO, but a lack of specifically-qualified Java-based staff. Often, it is people that have a generalized idea of Java based on knowledge of Javascript, which is different. CodyGray has some great qualifications, but moderators on many sites like this often appear a bit too focused on lecturing the users over addressing the issue directly. I prefer a moderator that can help clean up the site, not the user base and feel that a clear understanding of the language can help in doing that. (Resubmitted for grammar / wording) – Abandoned Cart Jul 31 '17 at 14:25

12 Answers 12

370

I'm Andy, and these are my answers. My nomination post is available here. I've tried to keep most of the answers here short but informative. I know there will be a lot of text for everyone to read as more nominations come in.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

I do not delete the question. Unfortunately, for the poster, by posting the question they licensed it to Stack Exchange under the CC-SA. However, I will explain that they do have a few options. Option 1 is to request disassociation from the specific post that may get them in trouble. This removes their name from the post. Option 2 is to change code in the specific post to something more generic that still exhibits the problem the question is focused on. A combination of these two options may be appropriate as well. In rare cases, it's appropriate to ask for the original revision to be deleted.

If the question and answers are not good (i.e. everything is down voted), I'm more willing to remove the entire post from the site. I do not like the idea of removing multiple good answers simply because someone didn't realize they can't post proprietary code on a public web site.

  1. Say you just performed a simple moderator action, like closing a question and leaving a comment explaining why. The question's owner disagrees with your decision, flags your comment as "no longer needed" and replies with a comment that should be flagged as "rude or abusive". Do you handle the situation yourself or do you wait for another mod to clean up? If you handle it yourself, do you just dismiss their flag, delete their comment and move on or do take further action?

I'm going to handle this situation in a couple ways. The rude or abusive comment will be eliminated. Regardless of my involvement in the question or not, that type of behavior violates the Be Nice policy. I feel I can handle that without any conflict of interest. More than likely that will be the end of it at that point.

As for the "no longer needed" comment, I imagine that if I left a comment it's going to be clear as to why I think the question should be closed. I can let another moderator judge that comment and come to a reasonable decision.

  1. Someone uses a custom flag to ask for a question to be migrated to another site. You're not a member of the target site. How do you decide whether or not to migrate the question?

Rule number 1: Don't migrate crap. If the question is bad here, it's bad there. No other site on the network is the toilet bowl of Stack Overflow. Just as I trust moderators across the network to migrate good questions here, I will do the same for them. If it passes rule number 1, and there isn't further guidance by existing moderators to check for certain sites, I'll perform the migration. If the target site rejects the migration, I'll figure out why so that I don't make the same mistake again. If it is accepted on the target site, then hopefully the user is able to get a good answer there.

  1. Given a question that's closed as a duplicate of a fairly popular question (say a score of 10+, with multiple decent answers having a score of 5+), a gold tag badge user comes along, single-handedly reopens it and posts an answer that doesn't really differ that much from the ones in the duplicate. The answer or question is flagged by a user who disagrees with the reopening, stating the answer merely duplicates content already present on the site. What do you do?

If a user is reopening and duplicating content, this is not ok. Not being a subject matter in everything, I'd hope that the flag is helpful as well, so that I can further investigate if this is a one off situation or a situation that occurs repeatedly. If this is a repeated situation, I will send a message to user explaining why what they are doing is considered abusive. This will include a link to explain what a gold badge holder can do with their privileges and explain how we expect those privileges are used to help find and close duplicate questions, not reopen them and post more duplicate content.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

This is my question, thus I was prepared.

I'm proud of many of my posts on Meta.SO and around the network.

In these, you can see that I care about quality on Stack Overflow. I've spent time analyzing the problem, as I see it, and present my findings to the community. I participated in the discussions that these posts generated.

Elsewhere on the network, my participation in meta has helped to shape communities. For example, on Hardware Recommendations, my meta post about "What type of hardware is allowed" helped to set the scope of what the community accepts as on topic hardware. I've also helped to set up the high quality guidelines for questions and argued against certain types of tags and hardware.

With all of these, I've presented my arguments and logic and strived to remain professional. I believe this was also a big part of the reason I was appointed to a moderator position on Hardware Recommendations.

As a moderator on Community Building, I've been involved in many discussions. I was involved in the discussions to rename the community from Moderators.SE to CommunityBuilding.SE. I've been involved in discussions about slow growth of the community. I've also presented arguments that go against other moderators, and walked away still feeling like a moderation team.

Through these meta posts across the network, I think you can pick up on my moderation style and personality. I like data and I try to present my thoughts in a way that is understandable to all. I'm also willing to speak my mind, but want to work with those involved as we try to solve the problem. I also try to help other communities with my experiences as a moderator.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

This is a two step process, but I don't know if the community would ever see any of my actions. The first step would be to get a second/third/fourth opinion from other moderators. Am I doing something wrong? If so, I'd need to adjust what I was doing. Assuming it's required, I'd also apologize to the user and explain what I'd be changing in the future. However, if the other moderators don't think I'm doing anything wrong, we move to the next step. Stack Overflow has many moderators and they don't work in isolation. To avoid a conflict of interest, I'd request another moderator handle the response to the user.

  1. Moderators are expected to spend only 30 mins of their time, but we all know that 30 mins is insufficient. There are 2100 flags per day in the queue, a few of them needing 10~15 minutes. Most moderators spend way more than 30 mins and a few spend hours together. Would you be able to scale up your work time when the demand increases?

Yes. I can handle the time commitment needed for this position. I've run for moderator previously and am well aware of the work and time that the Stack Overflow moderators put in to this position. I can handle the required time expectations. Additionally, I submit a lot of comment flags. Being part of the team would make this more efficient, because I can handle this work myself.

  1. Due to your status and actions as moderator and no matter how reasonable your conduct, you will be personally insulted more frequently, will have your competence questioned more publicly, and will be more exposed to negative sentiments. How will you cope with this negative pressure long-term when it comes from many users?

I've been an owner of a gaming community. I've owned, moderatated and participated in online communities for a long time. I've been insulted, emailed, and phoned. At this point, I believe I have some thick skin. I really appreciate this question. It's always nice to know that members of the community care about the mental health of those that are responsible for dealing with the unsavory bits. I am not concerned about my mental health though. I have hobbies and a family outside of Stack Overflow. Those are the things that I choose to worry about. Not someone on the internet telling me I'm wrong.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

No one has an exemption from the Be Nice policy. The posts are valued but the behavior isn't. I'd encourage the user to adjust the behavior. If this doesn't work (or hasn't worked repeatedly over a period of time), then a series of escalating bans - which is the common policy - would take place. With these bans, a mod message explaining that their behavior isn't acceptable would be sent, regardless of the quality of their posts. While it's unfortunate to lose a user that has contributed good content, if they are driving away other users with their behavior, it makes sense to eliminate the problem. A toxic atmosphere of abusive comments should not be something a user of any level of experience has to deal with.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

Talk with the other mod. That's the only way to handle this situation. I'm certainly not a mind reader and I'm guessing they aren't either. I'll take a few minutes to talk with them about my concerns, listen to their reasoning and, I imagine, we'll come to some kind of agreement on what to do with the post.

  • 3
    Do you have an opinion as to how to handle the current size of the close vote queue? Do you think that moderators should actively work the queues (VLQ, close votes, etc.) or focus primarily on things that the community can't do themselves? – EJoshuaS Jul 17 '17 at 20:22
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    Moderators have their own set of flags to handle. I think that is (and should be) their priority. However, that doesn't mean a mod can't go through any of the existing review queues as they wish. With 2.1K+ moderator flags a day though, I think handling those things the community can't handle should be their first focus – Andy Jul 17 '17 at 20:24
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    The posts you have that exemplify your moderation style only seem to delve into automated moderation and research. One doesn't need to be a moderator to come up with those tools, nor does it in my mind actually speak to the style of moderation you actually have. It'd be beneficial to you to provide more evidence of procedural moderation, rather than algorithmic moderation. – Makoto Jul 17 '17 at 20:54
  • 1
    Re #3: Do you have a specific methodology for keeping track of migration rejections on other sites? – Nathan Tuggy Jul 17 '17 at 21:04
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    @danny117: I will be amused if you end up not having anyone to vote for because all the candidates and all current mods agree with Andy's position. This is actually likely enough, I think. – Nathan Tuggy Jul 17 '17 at 21:53
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    @danny117: Please do not vote in the election if you're just going to pick randomly. I would also urge you to reconsider voting if your perspective is sufficiently narrow to consider that self-deletion on the web is more important than all of net neutrality/ISP competition, encryption, censorship, siloing, PII sales, fake news/clickbait/attention fraud, and malware, to name a few good candidates. (In particular, how is deleting pages more important, even just for privacy, than being able to ensure that governments and businesses aren't misusing your private info to start with?) – Nathan Tuggy Jul 18 '17 at 0:50
  • 17
    @danny117 if you disagree with the fact that your posts can be prevented from being erased, than you should have read the TOS and the license which you agreed to when you signed up. – angussidney Jul 18 '17 at 8:02
  • 1
    @danny117 your issue does not lie with the candidates. Even if a mod deletes, the content isn't removed and is still visible to those with enough rep to view it so your issue lies with Stack Overflow itself and their policy. Consider taking that up on Meta. – Bugs Jul 18 '17 at 8:09
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    @danny117 If someone wants their question removed. Then remove it. that's not how it could work even if we wanted it to. The fundamental idea of the place is that experts donate their time to build a library of helpful answers for future generations of readers. Many of those experts would not contribute if their help were to benefit the individual asker only. Allowing everyone to remove their questions once they've received an answer would undermine that goal. The current restrictions we have on self-deletion were introduced in response to people abusing the system that way. – Pekka 웃 Jul 18 '17 at 10:16
  • 3
    @danny117 Remember that everything you post on the SO network is licenced so it's not quite as simple as just deleting something. You also have external sites such as [archive.org](archive.org) indexing everything, not to mention anyone who takes your posts and puts it in their code base or blog post. You need to learn to live with the fact that once you've put something online, it's never really going to go away. – DavidG Jul 18 '17 at 11:36
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    @Makoto Re "One doesn't need to be a moderator to come up with those tools", I disagree. You need data to solve problems. I have access to a bunch of data Andy doesn't, just because I've signed the mod agreement and he hasn't been able to. Getting that data in Andy's hands would be a huge benefit to the site. – Undo Jul 18 '17 at 12:49
  • 2
    Users have licensed the content to Stack Exchange. In practice, this means that if a question has received good, helpful answers, the community doesn't remove the content. If, however, the question was bad and the question isn't helpful to users in the future, it will be removed. Users can remove their own question, but doing so after they have received an answer is not OK. At that point, the user can edit out sensitive bits of the question (without changing the meaning of the question) or request their name be removed from the question. – Andy Jul 19 '17 at 14:04
  • 3
    If someone left a comment pointing out that, in an otherwise well-written post, you had used the word "forth" instead of "fourth", how would you react? – YowE3K Jul 20 '17 at 2:56
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    @YowE3K I think the only correct answer to that question is to quietly fix it and pretend I don't know what the other person was talking about. :) – Andy Jul 20 '17 at 3:56
  • 2
    @Undo "Getting that data into Andy's hands" is not a reason in itself to elect anyone moderator. Makoto asked a very valid question. – Seth Jul 20 '17 at 4:39
245

Cody Gray

Denizens of Meta know that I tend to be rather wordy. However, there are a lot of candidates to consider in this election, so I've tried to respect your time and keep my answers as short as possible. That means they may not exhaustively cover the nuances of my thoughts and opinions, but they should get the point across.

I'm a very reasonable and rational person, always open to new ideas and opinions. And although I do tend to have strong opinions—that I'm more than willing to explain and justify—I would temper those somewhat when acting in my official capacity as a moderator. My job would be to enforce standing site policy, not create new, de facto policies.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

No. Beyond the licensing terms set out in the user agreement, people have spent time answering the question and, in doing so, made positive contributions to the site as a whole. Their efforts should be respected.

I would, however, be willing to remove any sensitive or personally-identifying information and anonymize the question so it isn't associated with the user's account.

  1. Say you just performed a simple moderator action, like closing a question and leaving a comment explaining why. The question's owner disagrees with your decision, flags your comment as "no longer needed" and replies with a comment that should be flagged as "rude or abusive". Do you handle the situation yourself or do you wait for another mod to clean up? If you handle it yourself, do you just dismiss their flag, delete their comment and move on or do take further action?

If someone has a problem with actions I've taken as a moderator—under virtually any circumstances—then no, I would not continue to handle the flags pertaining to that particular issue myself. We have plenty of other moderators, and we should all serve as a check on each other. Another moderator can process these flags and either uphold or rollback my actions.

If necessary, the issue can be brought to Meta, where I can post a reasoned defense of my actions, others can agree or disagree with supporting logic of their own, and we can come to a consensus.

That is, assuming I stand by my original action. If they're right and I totally goofed up (hey, it could happen!), I'll undo whatever my damage was and leave an apology comment.

  1. Someone uses a custom flag to ask for a question to be migrated to another site. You're not a member of the target site. How do you decide whether or not to migrate the question?

If the question is topical and otherwise suitable for Stack Overflow, it should stay here, so I won't migrate it.

If it is not a good fit for Stack Overflow, then I would still err on the side of not migrating it. Other sites should not be a dumping ground for our unwanted questions.

Of course, I'm not completely opposed to migration. If I evaluate the question and feel that it is a good question that would be an asset to another site, I would reach out to moderators (or trusted users) on that site and ask their opinions first.

  1. Given a question that's closed as a duplicate of a fairly popular question (say a score of 10+, with multiple decent answers having a score of 5+), a gold tag badge user comes along, single-handedly reopens it and posts an answer that doesn't really differ that much from the ones in the duplicate. The answer or question is flagged by a user who disagrees with the reopening, stating the answer merely duplicates content already present on the site. What do you do?

Assuming I agree with the flag, I would reach out to the user who posted the answer and ask why they thought this question merited reopening. Clearly, someone who has a gold tag badge knows how the site works and likely understands the problem domain better than I do, so I would tend to respect their judgment. But, I would still ask them to clarify, in hopes of making their answer more clear and/or the question more distinct.

If it's clearly abusive behavior and/or they cannot provide a valid justification, I would deal with it by re-closing the question and merging their answer into the "master" question.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

Hmm. I don't have any that I'm not proud of.

One thing I do feel strongly about is fairness and consistency. Another thing I feel strongly about is making the site better. I have high standards for quality.

If you have more time to kill, the list is in my profile. :-)

Otherwise, I assume you either know me from my Meta answers already, or you won't be swayed.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

Well, some friction is inevitable, I suppose. I don't expect everyone to like me, and all good moderators are the subject of their share of epic Meta tantrums.

I believe that Meta serves its purpose well. Actions you disagree with can be discussed, community consensus can be reached, and everything can be corrected with transparency. Everyone makes mistakes, and I'm certainly open to hearing differences of opinion. I would either need to be more careful in the future, or change my approach entirely.

If it was just an ongoing clash with a particular user, I would try to let another moderator handle any future issues with him/her. I'm not going to let one user stop me from doing my job, but at the same time, there's just no point in the two of us constantly butting heads.

  1. Moderators are expected to spend only 30 mins of their time, but we all know that 30 mins is insufficient. There are 2100 flags per day in the queue, a few of them needing 10~15 minutes. Most moderators spend way more than 30 mins and a few spend hours together. Would you be able to scale up your work time when the demand increases?

Yes. I have a very flexible schedule. There are many days where I spend 6+ hours on Stack Overflow. Although I currently spend most of that time providing answers to questions (because I feel that is where I can make the most difference), if given the tools to make a real dent in the site's overall quality, I would eagerly dive in.

I guess here is as good a place as any to comment on why I don't spend much time slogging through the "review" queues. First of all, as a regular user, I prefer to review "organically", as I come across problems in the tags where I am an expert. Second, I've been around a lot longer than the current review queues, and—like many of you—I am frustrated with their design and implementation. I'm no stranger to reviewing; I just do less of it now than I used to. Third, it quickly grows tiring and discouraging when you spend hours and hours slogging through garbage without seeing much of a payoff. It takes too many people to take out the trash, and it stinks an awful lot in the meantime. This is why I'm asking for moderator privileges: with these, I will be able to make a much more significant impact, and that would be a powerful motivation for me to put in more than my fair share of time.

  1. Due to your status and actions as moderator and no matter how reasonable your conduct, you will be personally insulted more frequently, will have your competence questioned more publicly, and will be more exposed to negative sentiments. How will you cope with this negative pressure long-term when it comes from many users?

I have no problem being called out, and although no one really likes it, I try very hard not to take things personally.

When the criticism is presented rationally, I will always respond in kind, presenting my rationale and maintaining an open mind.

Otherwise, I'll just ignore it. I might laugh a little, too. I hear that's good for the soul.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

It depends on the nature of the arguments/flags. I take a pretty laid-back approach to comments, and I try not to read too much into textual conversations. But certainly, if the flags were valid, this is something that would merit a private message to the user. It is often the case that people are unaware of how their remarks are being interpreted and are only inadvertently causing problems. Hopefully, we could work towards a solution that works for all parties. If a user is producing a steady stream of valuable answers, I would work very hard to keep them an active, productive member here, while still trying to balance the well-being of all our members.

On the other hand, there is one case where I would take swift action, and that is when one user is personally attacking another user. I have absolutely no tolerance for that, and if a pattern of such actions were brought to my attention, it would merit an immediate suspension. You simply cannot attack other people, use slurs, or otherwise engage in abusive behavior, no matter how valuable your contributions are.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

Umm, I would talk to them? :-)

If we couldn't come to a consensus in a private (or semi-private) forum, I would bring the issue to Meta. I'd present my arguments for re-opening (or undeleting) the question, and I would ping the other moderator to share their thoughts as well. Then, I'd leave it up to the community to decide what should be done.

I'm obviously not going to get into a close/delete war with another moderator, no matter how much fun that might be to watch.

  • 32
    Very happy to see your submission. You are someone I see regularly on meta as a voice of reason and sense, good luck! – DavidG Jul 21 '17 at 12:18
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    I am confused this time whom to vote among NathanOliver, Andy and Cody Gray. You all deserve to be a moderator on SO. It will be difficult to vote this time as only two seats are available. Best of luck to all of you. – haccks Jul 21 '17 at 14:28
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    If you need moar down votes, let me know ... ;) – rene Jul 21 '17 at 16:49
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    Note to self: if Cody gets elected, do things he'll object to to trick him into coming to our private chat room. – BoltClock Jul 22 '17 at 2:44
  • 5
    @Makoto That's pretty easy to answer, actually. If I see anything that I think can be salvaged by editing, I will do so. I certainly think that question you point to is a candidate for being salvaged. Your edit is superb, and I'd like to think very similar to what I would have done. I'm not sure what you mean by "go with the flow". If it has accumulated close votes, I'm not going to clear all those votes and forcibly override the community after editing. And it'd really depend on how confident I was in my edit whether I'd reopen a closed Q. I might still leave it for the community to judge. – Cody Gray Jul 22 '17 at 11:16
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    "[Reviewing] quickly grows tiring and discouraging when you spend hours and hours slogging through garbage without seeing much of a payoff" This is the thing that keeps me from seriously considering nominating myself. My impression is that when you're a mod, you get a bigger shovel, sure, but the pile is that much bigger and deeper. Do you not worry that you will find the same slog, just through a new variety of refuse? – Josh Caswell Jul 23 '17 at 18:47
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    Well, I can't say for sure, @Josh, because I've never done it. But the feeling of helplessness is what bothers me the most. I will cast close votes all day long and never see but one or two questions actually get closed. That makes me feel like I've wasted my time, and I hate wasting time. If I'm actually making a difference (observable progress), then I believe I'll be more strongly motivated to continue. In other words, it isn't the slog itself that discourages me so much as the seeming futility. – Cody Gray Jul 24 '17 at 10:57
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    @danyamachine It isn't a "bio". My bio is in my profile. You're referring to the nomination post. Second, I never said anything about who is making the posts. In fact, the fundamental principle of Stack Overflow is that users don't matter—all that matters is content. We don't judge or rank users; we rank content (that's what votes are for). Low-quality questions are a scourge on this site, no matter who posts them. There are plenty of high-quality questions posted by inexperienced users, and those are getting drowned out by low-effort posts that don't comply with our guidelines. ... – Cody Gray Jul 25 '17 at 7:15
  • 2
    … This, I think, is a serious problem and should be concerning to all users of Stack Overflow. Finally, I disagree that the goal of Stack Overflow should be to "create a more inclusive and welcoming environment". While we must respect all users, that's not the same thing as being "welcoming". See this answer for details (specifically, the bottom). I'm not talking about cases where questions are "borderline". I'm all about helping those people out, like I told Makoto. I'm talking about cases where there is no attempt made to follow our standards. – Cody Gray Jul 25 '17 at 7:16
  • 4
    The analogy here is Wikipedia. Are they a "welcoming" place? Sure, in some sense—everyone is welcome to contribute. But in other senses, no. If your contributions are low-quality, then they are rolled back. If low-quality contributions and spam continually come from your IP address, then your IP address will eventually be blocked. Same thing here on Stack Overflow. We are not designed to be a tutoring or mentoring website. We only do Q&A, and what makes us distinct from other sites like Yahoo Answers is our strict focus on quality. That's why I'm here; I suspect it's why you are, too. – Cody Gray Jul 25 '17 at 7:19
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    I suppose that makes sense. My interpretation of the question was not limited to cheaters. We occasionally get questions from people who have accidentally included sensitive information in their code snippets, like email addresses and/or passwords. These are the kinds of things that I would be willing to remove as a moderator. When it was a student asking to cover up evidence of cheating, I'd be much more reluctant to hide the evidence, for the reasons you say. However, it might be the case that my hands are tied. The user agreement says SO will anonymize content upon request of the user, so.. – Cody Gray Jul 25 '17 at 10:36
  • 3
    Yeah, actually, thinking more about this in the context of someone trying to cheat on their school assignments, I'm not actually sure what I would do. Thanks for bringing the issue to my attention, @user21820. For what it's worth, I take an extremely hardline stance on issues like plagiarism and academic integrity (I worked as a teacher for a number of years, and have lots of academic background, so that shouldn't be too surprising). I have no tolerance for students trying to cheat on homework. I'll have to find out a bit more about what my obligations would be under the user agreement. – Cody Gray Jul 25 '17 at 10:46
  • 2
    @danyamachine Sorry, I don't understand what part you think was "acrimonious". As for the view that the primary concern is content, not people, that's pretty much unanimously held and expressed by long-time users and moderators. You see the expressed literally all over the place on Meta. This Meta question speaks directly to that issue. And here is another that is highly relevant. There are many others where it is mentioned in answers. – Cody Gray Jul 25 '17 at 14:40
  • 2
    Also relevant: I've written at length before about how this lack of focus on users is actually a big benefit to Stack Overflow, even though it seems at first blush like it might be "cold" or "insensitive". – Cody Gray Jul 25 '17 at 14:47
  • 3
    As someone who's given up on the deluge of garbage, I enthusiastically endorse your platform. – Wooble Jul 25 '17 at 18:45
142

I'm Nathan Oliver and these are my answers to your questions:

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

I do not delete the question. I will offer the user the option to disassociate the question from their profile but I will not remove valuable contributions. If the entire post is garbage then I do not have a problem deleting it.

  1. Say you just performed a simple moderator action, like closing a question and leaving a comment explaining why. The question's owner disagrees with your decision, flags your comment as "no longer needed" and replies with a comment that should be flagged as "rude or abusive". Do you handle the situation yourself or do you wait for another mod to clean up? If you handle it yourself, do you just dismiss their flag, delete their comment and move on or do take further action?

The flag of my comment I'll let another moderator handle. The rude/abusive reply is a trickier situation. If it clear violates the be nice policy then I'll nuke it. If it is borderline or I could see someone flagging it but I would not then I'll let the people who see it handle it.

  1. Someone uses a custom flag to ask for a question to be migrated to another site. You're not a member of the target site. How do you decide whether or not to migrate the question?

First I would look at the help page of that site. If I feel confident that it fits then I'll migrate it. If not I would ask any of the other active mods how they feel. If I still can't make a decision I'll leave it for the other mods to handle. All of this assumes the question is even good enough to be a good question. If it isn't then it should be closed here until it can be edited into shape

  1. Given a question that's closed as a duplicate of a fairly popular question (say a score of 10+, with multiple decent answers having a score of 5+), a gold tag badge user comes along, single-handedly reopens it and posts an answer that doesn't really differ that much from the ones in the duplicate. The answer or question is flagged by a user who disagrees with the reopening, stating the answer merely duplicates content already present on the site. What do you do?

It is not okay to reopen a duplicate question just to regurgitate the same information in maybe a more personalized answer. If the duplicate closure was appropriate I would close the question as a duplicate again. I will also send a message to the gold badge holder letting them know this is not acceptable behavior. If they feel the target is lacking something they can add an answer there to make it more complete.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

This question was a good one for me as it helped me with my flagging of answers. I fell this question show how I want to help Shepard new users which I think benefits us all if they then continue on to be good contributors.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

First I would consult with my fellow mods to see if it really is me that has the problem. If it is then I will try to correct it and offer an apology to the user.

If my fellow moderators feel I am in the right then I will leave it to them to handle the situation. That way no one, including said user, can claim conflict of interest.

  1. Moderators are expected to spend only 30 mins of their time, but we all know that 30 mins is insufficient. There are 2100 flags per day in the queue, a few of them needing 10~15 minutes. Most moderators spend way more than 30 mins and a few spend hours together. Would you be able to scale up your work time when the demand increases?

Yes. I'm typically on the site for at least 8 hours a day so I shouldn't have a problem dedicating enough time to the moderator queues.

  1. Due to your status and actions as moderator and no matter how reasonable your conduct, you will be personally insulted more frequently, will have your competence questioned more publicly, and will be more exposed to negative sentiments. How will you cope with this negative pressure long-term when it comes from many users?

I'm kind of used to this already. With my work with SOCVR, dealing with posts Smoke Detector calls out, and just what I have seen over the years I fell this will not be an issue. I have pretty thick skin to begin with and I'm pretty good at ignoring the negativity while still being able to respond constructively. Will I always be OK? Probably not, but I believe in the times that I am not I will be able to walk away like I currently do.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Everyone is required to Be Nice. If the user is not then first I'll start with a moderator message. If it continues to be a problem them I'll start a short suspension to hopefully drive the point home. If the user still continues to be a problem then I'll institute a longer suspension and talk to my fellow moderators about how we want to proceed.

To put it another way: Your contributions to the site, however good they may be, do not excuse you from following the site rules.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I would talk to them as they might know something I don't. If we can't come to an agreement I would ask other mods how they feel about it.

  • 5
    Will you still keep working the close vote room? Do you think that being a moderator would change how you approach close votes/tag cleanups/tag burniation/[cv-pls] requests? – EJoshuaS Jul 17 '17 at 22:04
  • Regarding 4: what if the user had a legitimate reason to reopen the question? It's totally possible that the question is actually not a duplicate, but it is not obvious that that is the case. Is it better to re-close without letting the user explain first? – Justin Jul 17 '17 at 22:06
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    @EJoshuaS Yes, I would like to keep my current status with SOCVR. I do not feel anything I do now would change if I became a moderator. I already do very few cv-pls as I try to only use them for post that are really bad so in that aspect I think those would stop completely since I could unilaterally close something. – NathanOliver Jul 17 '17 at 22:06
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    @Justin If it is really not a duplicate then that is a different story. If I can't tell if it is a dupe or not then I'll defer to the other mods/gold badge holder. Dupes can be tricky and I try to stay out of it when it comes to them unless they are in my domain. – NathanOliver Jul 17 '17 at 22:08
  • Posts can contain sensitive credentials, or top-secret code. In those circumstances, would you still not delete? – Makoto Jul 18 '17 at 3:16
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    @Makoto: In case NathanOliver isn't aware, we have the ability to remove sensitive information from a post's history altogether without having to permanently "delete" (hide from < 10k) the entire post - this does require approval from another mod and isn't always immediate (though it only takes minutes), so as a safety measure we are encouraged to "delete" (again, hide) the post in the meantime, and restore it once the redaction has gone through. – BoltClock Jul 18 '17 at 4:31
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    @Makoto as BoltClock mentions in that case I would delete, redact the information, and then undelete it. – NathanOliver Jul 18 '17 at 11:34
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    Glad to see a C++ domain expert (actually 2!) among the moderator candidates. I feel like nearly all the moderators have primary expertise in other languages. In my experience you've always spent plenty of time doing informal moderation (question flagging and the like), and you are respectful of the community – AndyG Jul 21 '17 at 12:10
  • "If the entire post is garbage"? The question was asked and had valuable responses, but was asked to be removed due to a conflict of interest. I would assume the question, itself, must have been acceptable and simply ignoring the responses seems a bit hasty. Was this your intention? – Abandoned Cart Jul 31 '17 at 14:05
  • @LoungeKatt I never said I would ignore them. I would offer them the option to have it dissociated. I would not remove it if there is good content there though. – NathanOliver Jul 31 '17 at 14:11
  • @NathanOliver Thanks for the clarification, but the question did specify there is valuable content. A lot of misunderstanding can occur from not taking the time to read a question or comment in full before responding. I consider this even more relevant for this particular set of questions. – Abandoned Cart Jul 31 '17 at 14:17
  • @LoungeKatt So, since there is valuable content I would not delete it. The OP not being allowed to post it does not mean it should be removed. They posted it, people took there time to answer it and the OP benefited. Removing it would cancel out all the help the answers provided. We might be able to edit it, we disassociate it, but I would not remove it. – NathanOliver Jul 31 '17 at 14:22
  • @NathanOliver I never stated it should be removed, either. I was actually confused as to why you would make a comment like "If the entire post is garbage then I do not have a problem deleting it." when that seemed to be irrelevant and your replies have completely contradicted that statement. – Abandoned Cart Jul 31 '17 at 14:27
  • @LoungeKatt I'm sorry but I have seemed to missed the question. Are you just asking why I even bothered putting If the entire post is garbage then I do not have a problem deleting it. in my answer to that question? – NathanOliver Jul 31 '17 at 14:32
92

I'm Yvette and my nomination is here.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

No I would not delete the question. We don't delete good content from the site, as it disadvantages the site as a whole. I would inform the user that they can apply to have the question disassociated from their account. I would leave a comment with a link to this question What is the proper route for a dissociation request? and the suggestion they contact the community team to do so.

  1. Say you just performed a simple moderator action, like closing a question and leaving a comment explaining why. The question's owner disagrees with your decision, flags your comment as "no longer needed" and replies with a comment that should be flagged as "rude or abusive". Do you handle the situation yourself or do you wait for another mod to clean up? If you handle it yourself, do you just dismiss their flag, delete their comment and move on or do take further action?

Firstly I don't think it would be a good idea to leave a comment, explaining why the post was closed, as the close reason would be better to be contained within the closed/ on hold notice. As such, I would not view any comment as pertinent to the close reason. It is easy enough to accept the flag as "no longer needed" and delete the comment, as the user has acknowledged reading the comment, by flagging it.

So I'd have no issue handling the flag to delete the comment I made and accepting it.

As for the "rude or abusive" comment made by the user, I would delete it.

Just to be clear, one rude comment (that hasn't been flagged) wouldn't warrant any further action in my book. It would be easier to delete it and move on. People sometimes get upset and say things in the heat of the moment, as long as it's not a habit, I can forgive it.

With one caveat:
If the comment was clearly over the line (obscene or threatening), I would delete it and then ask another mod in the private moderator chatroom if anything further should be taken, for example contacting the user. I don't think it's something I should handle myself, if it's personal to me. This way it ensures that I'm not being biased.

On Pets.se I have deleted a rude post that was aimed at myself and another user, but it was flagged by a third party. When it came to destroying the account I actually asked Shog in the moderator's chatroom (he was the only other user at the time who could see the post history) if the account should be destroyed. Shog destroyed the account. It was the user's only post.

  1. Someone uses a custom flag to ask for a question to be migrated to another site. You're not a member of the target site. How do you decide whether or not to migrate the question?

I would do what I already do when I think a question may be on topic for another site.

Firstly I would check that it was off topic for our site. A question being on topic for another site, doesn't preclude it from being on topic for this site.

Then, I would go to the site's chatroom and ask them. I've taken an interest in trying to get to know what's on topic for some of our related sites, for just that reason. I'm mindful that we should not be migrating off topic content and especially not low quality material.

Should we add Software Recommendations as a migration target?

What is the latest on adding Code Review to Off-Topic Migration Options?

On Pets.se I recently migrated a question to Health.se after discussion with other users, in this case it was clear what the scope is for the Health.se site, but I wanted to check if it was off topic for the pets site first.

Except currently on Stack Overflow I will vote to close with a message that it belongs on another site.

  1. Given a question that's closed as a duplicate of a fairly popular question (say a score of 10+, with multiple decent answers having a score of 5+), a gold tag badge user comes along, single-handedly reopens it and posts an answer that doesn't really differ that much from the ones in the duplicate. The answer or question is flagged by a user who disagrees with the reopening, stating the answer merely duplicates content already present on the site. What do you do?

If I was at all unsure with the duplication and answer, I would discuss it with the gold badge holder, to find out why both the question and answer are not duplications. They earn the badges with good reason and I wouldn't presume to be arrogant over the content.

If it proved to be a duplication, I would re-close the question as a duplicate. If the answer was not flagged, I would leave it. If it was flagged and truly was just duplicating other answers, I'd delete it, but leave a comment for the user first, so they could see my thoughts about it.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

This is a general SE meta answer, but to me it epitomises what I love about the site.

Why don't we keep public records of suspensions?

The fact that the site is not punitive in nature, it works to encourage people to be their best. That is what I try to do. I don't always succeed, but I am always striving to encourage people and to educate people. It's important to forgive easily. If another user and I do not see eye to eye on something, I don't hold that against that user. It's better to move on and forward.

This question Educating people to flag spam and not vote to close which is highly upvoted, demonstrates my efforts in action. To assist in helping the community to run as smoothly as possible. As does this answer What to do when a high rep user answers a low-quality, off-topic or duplicate question?. I believe in people taking responsibility for their actions and to be shown where they're going wrong and how to adjust it. I also freely accept feedback myself, as evidenced in my suspension post.

Professionalism.

Another issue, that I understand is contentious, but nevertheless is important to me and I believe is important to the programming community as a whole is this Diminishing Numbers of Women in Programming and the SO Experience. Now, how would this affect my moderation style? I would not discriminate at all based on gender, that is counter productive. I do point out comments that make me uncomfortable as a woman. This is usually met with mixed reactions Set a benchmark on acceptable behaviour, but I honestly, think it's good that I can stand up with a voice.

Any sexist or sexualised comments don't have a place in our main site, on meta or any chatrooms that are used for moderation. I believe in keeping it SFW and not objectifying any part of our community.

Having said that. I am not against having fun and joking. There's plenty of chatrooms where the bar is lower and we all mess around. The key is too not cross the line in hurting people or making them feel uncomfortable.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

Firstly, I would answer any constructive questions that the user posts, to explain my reasoning and make any apologies or adjustments where needed, or stand my ground if I believe my actions were warranted. I would self-evaluate. Are these criticisms warranted? How can I improve my communication style, as there's obviously something about my behaviour that's irritating this user.

Secondly, I would not answer the ranting questions, I would leave a comment, that this seems like a rant, but I would not close the question. I would allow the community and the other mods to handle it. There is no need to flame the fire.

Thirdly, I would discuss this in the mod chatroom and see what we would come to collectively. It may involve sending the user a private message, if it proved to be obsessive behaviour on part of the user and counter-productive. I would leave any further actions, private messages, possible account suspensions to another mod.

Last, I would work hard at resolving the issues with the user, we don't want to lose good contributors. If the person is usually calm, then it's an issue we can sort out.

  1. Moderators are expected to spend only 30 mins of their time, but we all know that 30 mins is insufficient. There are 2100 flags per day in the queue, a few of them needing 10~15 minutes. Most moderators spend way more than 30 mins and a few spend hours together. Would you be able to scale up your work time when the demand increases?

Yes, I easily spend many hours on the network and would focus more on Stack Overflow moderation. I work and study from home and I leave pertinent tabs open and check them throughout the day. I find it's easier to pace myself and to do reviewing in smaller parcels throughout the day and this time accumulates quite easily. In fact checking out review tasks is a nice break from working or studying.

  1. Due to your status and actions as moderator and no matter how reasonable your conduct, you will be personally insulted more frequently, will have your competence questioned more publicly, and will be more exposed to negative sentiments. How will you cope with this negative pressure long-term when it comes from many users?

When I first joined the network about 5 years ago, I didn't post for a long time, as I was too nervous. I eventually got the courage to post and ended up becoming very unpopular. That was mainly due to my approach. (although the Network has needed to push the Be Nice policy)

When I returned I had learnt a lot and ventured forth into the land of meta. A turning point was becoming part of the community and a regular in the chat rooms. Gradually earning the respect and support of people. Having support goes a long way in managing negative sentiments.

One thing I've learnt, since being a mother, is to let insults run off my back.

Folks'll rant about whatever distinguishing characteristics they can latch onto if they can't actually argue with a person's track record.

Not everyone is going to like me. Not everyone likes me now. That's life and the only thing I can do is to keep working on my professionalism and maturing as a person and it's important to pace myself. I don't need to live on the site. If it gets too much, have a time out and go and see my horses.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Manage flags as they are presented and take the user into a chatroom and discuss the user's attitude. Clear communication, to both understand the user and clearly define what is acceptable behaviour on the site, without alienating the user.

As last case resort; if the user proves to be troublesome, discuss it with the other mods in chat and possibly send the user a private message, making it clear that the user's efforts are appreciated, but there needs to be some attitude changes.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I would ask the mod in the mod chatroom, to understand their reasoning and if I felt strongly that it was a mistake, I would state my case and encourage other mods to weigh in, in helping to make the decision to undelete or reopen the question. I think it's important there's no public war or dissension about differing opinions.

  • 6
    Move ahead #Colomb – IntelliJ Amiya Jul 18 '17 at 7:05
  • @IntelliJAmiya thank you :) – Yvette Colomb Jul 18 '17 at 7:06
  • 3
    If I counted correctly, you have around 100 positively-scored Meta.SO posts (which is a good number), plus you have a gold Marshall badge for 500+ helpful flags and 5 Steward badges for 1000+ reviews in the queues. Definitely +1 from me. – EJoshuaS Jul 20 '17 at 15:40
  • @EJoshuaS Thanks, yes, I'm a regular on here and in two rooms known for discussing spam, low quality posts and close votes. – Yvette Colomb Jul 21 '17 at 1:48
  • Yep, that's another reason for +1. If elected, would you keep being involved in the Close Vote room and/or doing "ordinary" review queues (Close Votes, VLQ, etc.), or focus more on flags? – EJoshuaS Jul 21 '17 at 16:58
  • 1
    @EJoshuaS I would manage flags, but I'd also look at the close vote queue, as it's enormous. I'd stay in charcoal, as we flag spam all over the network and still hang out in SOCVR - as that way I can see my friends and if anyone needs anything urgently, I'm there or just a ping away. I want to be approachable (within reason :) ). – Yvette Colomb Jul 22 '17 at 2:23
  • 1
    Consider me a fan. I haven't come across you much on the main site, but I've often found your Meta input valuable and level-headed. – AkselA Jul 22 '17 at 21:02
  • @AkselA thanks for your support. Glad I've been helpful :) – Yvette Colomb Jul 23 '17 at 2:21
  • 8
    Voting to close this was not a nice move. Meta is for many kind of questions, and is the voice of users. – Cœur Jul 24 '17 at 16:20
  • 2
    @Cœur The question was a no-repro, as the site was back up - which is why I voted the way I did. I'm sorry if that was wrong. The community is allowed to vote to close questions- it's not about being "nice". – Yvette Colomb Jul 25 '17 at 0:43
  • 1
    Tangential review and comment meta-discussion moved to chat. – Shog9 Jul 26 '17 at 17:20
  • 1
    Hi Yvette. If possible, and still on time, please let me ask you not to erase yourself from this community. There's so much work to do on Main, so much data to be gathered and behaviours to be funneled! As one of the thousands of your voters, seeing you burn out for Meta stuff is a bummer. Meta can sort herself out and Main is crying for help. All the best! – brasofilo May 10 '18 at 4:46
  • @brasofilo thanks for your kind words. I'm not leaving. I'm having a break. My external life struggles are making it hard for me to be effective on the site. Once I'm over this hump I'll be back, but won't come in guns blazing, just back to modding and trying to keep a low profile. I feel I owe the people who voted for me to be the best I can be. – Yvette Colomb May 10 '18 at 10:42
85

I am the Baum mit Augen. Let me try to answer your questions:

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

I would be very reluctant to destroy even mediocre valid answers, let alone "very good" ones. For one, deleting their work is not fair towards the answers' authors and their effort. Also, I don't like needlessly hiding the information they provided from future readers.

Instead, there are two things one can do to save both the asker and the content: For school work, it is probably enough to just disassotiate the question from the asker's account.

Where that does not solve the problem, I would try to guide the asker in editing their question to be about the underlying programming problem instead of the specific assignment or piece of company code, for example by replacing the offending code with a proper and abstract MCVE. Thus, we hopefully can get all of the problematic content out of the way while preserving the actual, useful programming knowledge.

  1. Say you just performed a simple moderator action, like closing a question and leaving a comment explaining why. The question's owner disagrees with your decision, flags your comment as "no longer needed" and replies with a comment that should be flagged as "rude or abusive". Do you handle the situation yourself or do you wait for another mod to clean up? If you handle it yourself, do you just dismiss their flag, delete their comment and move on or do take further action?

The community gives the moderators great power and thus must be able to trust them not to abuse it.

So from the mod side of view, everything that even potentially can give the impression of conflict of interest should be avoided if possible, even if the moderator action looks perfectly justified.

In the specific case in the question, I'd avoid risking the accusation of surpressing disagreement with my mod tools and wait for another mod to handle the flag.

The only exception to that would be matters that need immediate mod attention, in which case I'd choose the least invasive route possible.

  1. Someone uses a custom flag to ask for a question to be migrated to another site. You're not a member of the target site. How do you decide whether or not to migrate the question?

For the more popular migration target sites, I'll try to learn what to migrate and what not from their help and meta in the first couple of days of office.

For the more obscure targets, I'll just ask when in doubt.

  1. Given a question that's closed as a duplicate of a fairly popular question (say a score of 10+, with multiple decent answers having a score of 5+), a gold tag badge user comes along, single-handedly reopens it and posts an answer that doesn't really differ that much from the ones in the duplicate. The answer or question is flagged by a user who disagrees with the reopening, stating the answer merely duplicates content already present on the site. What do you do?

This depends on the purpose of the flag.

If the flagger just wants to see the question closed or the new answer deleted, I'd say that's not a valid use of a flag. There is no reason to assume the random mod that gets to handle the flag is a better judge in the matter than the gold badge domain expert. From personal experience I know that even we gold badge holders don't always reach consensus. Keep in mind that the answers being very similar is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for the question to be a dupe!

Instead, the flagger should use their closevotes or flag as dupe and then let the community decide with votes.

If however, the flagger tries to make the mods aware of a user abusing their privilege to game the system, I would go ahead and investigate the issue. If the user's behavior is indeed suspicious, I'd mark the flag as helpful, and if I find prove for actual abuse, I'd take appropriate action against the offender on a case by case basis.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

I somewhat recently came across this question. While I very much agreed with the idea of rescuing those hidden gems, I found that the actual results were not as good as they could be. In my answer, I explained what parts of the process need improvement in my opinion so we can do a better job next time. I also attracted the attention of a moderator and went ahead and reviewed all answers to those questions. As a result, the poor answers were removed and the hidden gems actual got the exposure they deserved.

The take away from this: We should always review our own actions, and if they don't fully achieve their goal, try and improve the results.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

I'm not running because we need some revolutionary new ways of moderation, but because we need more of the great moderation we already have. If I do my job right, I'll just blend in with the current team.

So if some user, high rep or not, who is fine with the current moderation continously finds issues with my actions, I'm doing it wrong.

To resolve the issue, I'd try to learn how to fix my "moderation style" from their and other feedback. Hopefully, that would not take "several weeks" to begin with.

  1. Moderators are expected to spend only 30 mins of their time, but we all know that 30 mins is insufficient. There are 2100 flags per day in the queue, a few of them needing 10~15 minutes. Most moderators spend way more than 30 mins and a few spend hours together. Would you be able to scale up your work time when the demand increases?

Yes, absolutely. I'm a university student and already passed all my exams, I can basically moderate whenever I want. Spending several hours a day would not be an issue at all.

  1. Due to your status and actions as moderator and no matter how reasonable your conduct, you will be personally insulted more frequently, will have your competence questioned more publicly, and will be more exposed to negative sentiments. How will you cope with this negative pressure long-term when it comes from many users?

I don't see this being a problem. I already moderate a lot, hammer questions and left 1000s of comments. If someone has some constructive criticism or asks for clarification, I'm happy to reply, otherwise, I just flag and move on. I never had a sleepless night because someone on the internet thought I'm an idiot.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

First of all, I make sure that they actually are the problem. I personally have left 1000s of comments, most of them canned and carefully crafted to be constructive. Yet, I would be surprised if those haven't attracted a couple of dozen flags by users not happy about their posts being closed or deleted.

When we determined that it's actually the attitude of the user that causes the problems, we need to fix that some way or the other.

A reasonable chain of measures would be something like a simple warning at first to simply show them they act in an unacceptable way. If that is not enough, try and make him understand exactly why their behavior needs to change, with a discussion in chat for example. If that fails, let another mod try with different words, maybe there's some culture barrier or something.

If all that fails, they should be stopped from contributing until they learn their lesson. No one is that awesome and useful content wise that we should allow them to create a toxic atmosphere in our community.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

That greatly depends on the specific case.

If I think the moderator in question made simple mistake, maybe misjudged because of lack of domain knowledge, I just correct it. This is not about being right, but about getting the right result. I (very rarely) voted against mods in the past, and I don't think they were mad at me for that.

If I think the reason for their action was beyond a mistake (which would probably cover the vast majority of those occasions), I'll just ask them. If I still disagree after knowing their reason, we'll come to some conclusion in a discussion, I don't see how one would get emotional enough about some post for this being an issue. The resulting moderator action will be a correct one by community standards.

  • 2
    You say that you have enough time, because you already passed all your exams. Does this mean that you completely finished university or are you heading for the next semester? – honk Jul 18 '17 at 19:08
  • @honk I'll be working on my thesis for at least another semester, 12 months at most. After that I'll mostly be around CET evenings, nights and weekends. – Baum mit Augen Jul 18 '17 at 19:20
  • 5
    Does this mean that you might need to compromise about "several hours a day" after 6 to 12 months? I'm sorry for being pedantic, but I'd like to know what exactly we could expect if we unwrapped the Baum mit Augen moderator package ;) – honk Jul 18 '17 at 19:44
  • 6
    @honk When I start working, I won't moderate much during working hours and, unlike now, I'll have to sleep at night. Volume wise I should be fine, my studies take about as much time as normal job in my country. – Baum mit Augen Jul 18 '17 at 21:46
  • That sounds good. Thank you for clarifying. Good luck! – honk Jul 19 '17 at 6:44
  • 11
    Don't worry, we'll slip a 20 to your manager and make you get less work. – Bhargav Rao Jul 19 '17 at 11:32
  • @BhargavRao *20k. You forgot the 'k' after the 20. – Nathan Jul 21 '17 at 8:24
  • Nah, @Nathan, a 20 is enough. ;) – Bhargav Rao Jul 21 '17 at 9:37
  • 1
    @BhargavRao Stingy moderators are stingy :( – Nathan Jul 21 '17 at 9:41
  • You should add a link to here on the election site. – Walter Jul 24 '17 at 22:27
  • 1
    @Walter Unfortunately, the character limit kind of prevents that without seriously altering the nomination post. – Baum mit Augen Jul 25 '17 at 1:23
84

Floern here, with my answers to your questions. You can find my nomination here.

I tried to keep my answers compact. If there is something unclear or incomplete, please leave a comment.


  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

Delete? No. Removing content others have put much effort in is not something we should do. They shouldn't have posted it in the first place if it might cause trouble. As per the ToS SE doesn't have to delete the user's content since they granted SE the right to publish their content. But, the asker may request his question to be disassociated from their account. Also, if possible, the question might be edited in such a way that it doesn't change its meaning but is different enough (from their homework) not to cause any trouble.

  1. Say you just performed a simple moderator action, like closing a question and leaving a comment explaining why. The question's owner disagrees with your decision, flags your comment as "no longer needed" and replies with a comment that should be flagged as "rude or abusive". Do you handle the situation yourself or do you wait for another mod to clean up? If you handle it yourself, do you just dismiss their flag, delete their comment and move on or do take further action?

I'd refrain from handling flags where I'm involved directly since I might be biased. If it needs immediate attention I'd ping another mod. Unless the user starts spamming objectively rude insults, clearly violating the Be Nice policy, then I might also handle the rude comments myself.

  1. Someone uses a custom flag to ask for a question to be migrated to another site. You're not a member of the target site. How do you decide whether or not to migrate the question?

The question needs to be on topic on the target site and has to be of high quality. We do have general migration guidelines. If I can't determine whether the question is on topic for the target site I'd ask a mod or any other 'representative' of that site.

  1. Given a question that's closed as a duplicate of a fairly popular question (say a score of 10+, with multiple decent answers having a score of 5+), a gold tag badge user comes along, single-handedly reopens it and posts an answer that doesn't really differ that much from the ones in the duplicate. The answer or question is flagged by a user who disagrees with the reopening, stating the answer merely duplicates content already present on the site. What do you do?

We close questions as duplicates because we don't want answers to the same question distributed over several questions. So this behaviour is discouraged. If not, we wouldn't close questions as duplicates in the first place.

As for handling the answer and its author (assuming the answer is really just a mirror of the other answers without any parts specifically adapted to the question), I would send them a message explaining why their behaviour not welcomed.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

Most of my meta posts are either bug reports or answers to general support questions. But here are some link-worthy posts:

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

I'm open for criticism, if I'm doing something wrong please tell me, preferably on Meta so I can also get feedback from the community. I'm happy to adjust my actions according to the community consensus.

If it's something critical, or something that has no community consensus, I might have to discuss it with other mods.

  1. Moderators are expected to spend only 30 mins of their time, but we all know that 30 mins is insufficient. There are 2100 flags per day in the queue, a few of them needing 10~15 minutes. Most moderators spend way more than 30 mins and a few spend hours together. Would you be able to scale up your work time when the demand increases?

Until now I was here for half the day, seven days a week. As a mod I'd no longer produce flags but handle them during those hours.

  1. Due to your status and actions as moderator and no matter how reasonable your conduct, you will be personally insulted more frequently, will have your competence questioned more publicly, and will be more exposed to negative sentiments. How will you cope with this negative pressure long-term when it comes from many users?

I've already had to read messages directed to me stating certain things. And I figured out they don't affect me in a negative way.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Assuming the comments regularly scratch at the Be Nice policy I might have to take further action. You cannot compensate bad behaviour with good content. First I'd send a message telling them we don't tolerate their behaviour and they should refrain from leaving such comments. If that does not help, I have to take more drastic measures, up until a suspension. While a suspension would cause the loss of an otherwise good contributor, they're not above our policies.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I'd ask them why they did it. Maybe I missed some detail that warranted their action. Getting into a close/reopen or delete/undelete war between mods certainly doesn't help. Depending on the impact of their action, I might do more or less against it: When they close an average question I probably won't insist much, but when they convert certain posts to community wiki, we'd have to discuss a little bit more.

  • The modern internet has to include an erase button. – danny117 Jul 18 '17 at 0:14
  • 31
    @danny117 I assume you're referring to the non-deletion practice? I do support deletion of private or otherwise sensitive information (which does happen on SO, e.g. removing accidentally posted passwords). But for non-critical content like a simple question I think it's OP's responsibility to avoid posting it in the first place. This has been the accepted norm on SO. – Floern Jul 18 '17 at 0:37
  • Are you the floern who made the XKCD viewer app for Android? – David Jul 25 '17 at 3:49
  • @David you mean the xkcd Browser, yes I made that one – Floern Jul 25 '17 at 7:57
  • I love that app. Thanks! You got my vote. – David Jul 25 '17 at 22:32
  • @Floern I have had my fair share of interactions where things were closed for unexplained reasons or someone was allowed to be abused because it was more important to maintain a single detail that may prove useful in the future than prevent a user from feeling alienated. It is nice to see someone that is interested in an explanation to better understand the issue before throwing out a decision based on their own feelings. I am one of the people that questions a moderators competence, but also see the value of one willing to remember they were once a member. Good luck! – Abandoned Cart Jul 31 '17 at 14:11
63

my name is Travis, and these are my responses to the questionnaire for my nomination.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

This situation would not immediately warrant deletion on its own. There are many instances of this type of situation occurring where the post still remains.

I would advise them to edit the material out of the question which violates work or school policy, preferably by creating a minimal complete verifiable example.

If the post contained harmful information to the user such as database credentials or an API key, there is an option to make an edit and redact the original version of the post in order to remove the sensitive data.

The user may also wish to have their post disassociated from their account.

  1. Say you just performed a simple moderator action, like closing a question and leaving a comment explaining why. The question's owner disagrees with your decision, flags your comment as "no longer needed" and replies with a comment that should be flagged as "rude or abusive". Do you handle the situation yourself or do you wait for another mod to clean up? If you handle it yourself, do you just dismiss their flag, delete their comment and move on or do take further action?

I would avoid a conflict of interest here and attempt to get assistance from another moderator. This is beneficial not only from an ethical standpoint, but also from the standpoint of avoiding the situation where it seems that excessive action from one moderator is being used on a single user. I would also handle the inverse of this situation, if needed, for another moderator by removing the rude/abusive comment, explaining the be nice policy in a moderator message, and then taking action if needed based on the user's history of behavior.

  1. Someone uses a custom flag to ask for a question to be migrated to another site. You're not a member of the target site. How do you decide whether or not to migrate the question?

I would ask one of the other site moderators in chat what their opinion was before unilaterally moving content to their site.

  1. Given a question that's closed as a duplicate of a fairly popular question (say a score of 10+, with multiple decent answers having a score of 5+), a gold tag badge user comes along, single-handedly reopens it and posts an answer that doesn't really differ that much from the ones in the duplicate. The answer or question is flagged by a user who disagrees with the reopening, stating the answer merely duplicates content already present on the site. What do you do?

I would mark the flag as helpful.

I am going to assume the answer wasn't plagiarized here, because that would be easy to handle: delete, close, look for history of plagiarism, perhaps make an annotation, move on.

That said, answer migration is a hassle, and usually results from my observation in the posts being merged when necessary. So that workflow is not really an option. I would let the user know that questions asking for a solution to fundamentally identical problems are duplicates and that by posting an answer that does not change the duplicate nature of the two posts (assuming the duplicate closure was warranted), and would suggest they delete this post, then post their answer at the canonical post (the end target of the dupe chain) so that it gets more attention, helps more users, and can be used in the future as a target instead of buried where the just placed it. I would give them some time do accomplish this task because if they have a gold tag badge they deserve at least some benefit of the doubt in this type of circumstance.

I would also raise this issue on meta, because I would be curious what other users in that tag thought, and would want to raise awareness of not only this situation, but also this type of pattern, to see if there is anything such as new ideas or approaches available to ensure that there is a more seamless approach to creating new content for existing canonical posts.

I would not expect this to happen often, as most users wielding the dupehammer do not abuse it. Any consistent pattern of abuse with the dupehammer would result in an escalation discussion with another moderator or a CM about whether or not that should be addressed through further action.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

I am very active on meta, and have 677 posts between Stack Overflow meta and Meta Stack Exchange, and am one of 17 users holding a gold tag badge in discussion here at Stack Overflow meta (at the time of writing). Feel free to look at some of those if you are curious what my responses are like.

Here are some highlights:

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

This is just part of the increased spotlight that comes with the moderator diamond. It is important to keep in mind that while scrutiny seems personal the user is more than likely legitimately concerned with some angle of outlook or approach. While they may be vocal, others may not be, and if it requires saying then that is what I would expect. If it becomes abusive or over the top I would expect that other moderators would take notice of that type of situation and assist, but I would not personally take action where there was a conflict of interest.

The best I could do in that scenario would be to explain my point of view and reasoning, and either change my approach or resolve the issue by showing community consensus.

  1. Moderators are expected to spend only 30 mins of their time, but we all know that 30 mins is insufficient. There are 2100 flags per day in the queue, a few of them needing 10~15 minutes. Most moderators spend way more than 30 mins and a few spend hours together. Would you be able to scale up your work time when the demand increases?

Yes. Stack Overflow has helped me tremendously in my work, and has saved me a lot of time many times. I do not mind giving back to the site and the community with my time.

  1. Due to your status and actions as moderator and no matter how reasonable your conduct, you will be personally insulted more frequently, will have your competence questioned more publicly, and will be more exposed to negative sentiments. How will you cope with this negative pressure long-term when it comes from many users?

There is a pitfall involved in categorizing negative response to an action as a negative response to a character trait. I try to ensure that I examine the angle that others see, which is that they are genuinely trying to improve something or want the best outcome for a situation, and then examine that. Internalizing criticism is not a healthy way to live, in my opinion.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

If I see comments that are problematic I would act on them in an unbiased nature with regards to who posted them, and only take action if the content of the comment was not in line with the be nice policy or other content policies (such as spam, etc). Given the sensitivity of this issue, I would defer to a CM as this is more than likely not the case for many users with regards to escalation, and if the user is highly active then they are probably already well aware of the overall situation.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

If I was so inclined, I would just ask them why they felt it should have been, and we would have a constructive conversation about it. I may also just defer and try to deal with other pressing issues if it wasn't that high of a priority.

  • 6
    Travis, I think you're an awesome person. My only concern is your review and flag stats. They're on the low side and it makes me wonder how that would change being a mod. – Yvette Colomb Jul 18 '17 at 11:48
  • 4
    @YvetteColomb - I appreciate that and your concern. The reviews tend to be in the close vote review queue, and they are weighted towards closing questions asked in the last hour. In my experience, these posts are still subject to change, and it seems that focusing on posts which could be improved or are in the process of being improved is the wrong angle. Moreover, since these questions are brand new, they tend to also be actioned organically by the community. Overall, this to me seems like a misprioritization of efforts and it left me jaded overall to the review queue process. – Travis J Jul 18 '17 at 18:46
  • However, that is completely different when viewing issues which require immediate attention such as the mod queue. I believe I am very aware of site policy, company outlook, community consensus, and the technical tooling involved in processing such a queue at a quick pace. – Travis J Jul 18 '17 at 18:46
  • 4
    You raise a good point about closing questions soon after they're posted. The thing is, some are truly low in quality and they can always be reopened. The queue is huge and needs people on it. – Yvette Colomb Jul 19 '17 at 2:15
  • 1
    Wish you luck :D – abdoutelb Jul 27 '17 at 9:05
  • 1
    @YvetteColomb agreed, way too often flags in the close votes queue for "my" tags age away. I would vote anyone able to reduce the queue. :) – Nemo Jul 29 '17 at 8:43
  • @Nemo yes that queue is heavy join us in here if you need to get some help with your tags. – Yvette Colomb Jul 29 '17 at 8:56
  • with regards to your reply to q1, i would like to add that, many answers have the question quoted/copied (old version with sensitive data) which the asker should have the right to edit, delete without any confirmation from the answerer. I have seen many instances people sharing some important private keys/auth tokens being shared on stackoverflow with no way of deleting the question or edit those answers quoting the question immediately. – Shivam Jul 29 '17 at 20:40
  • @Shivam - The workflow is very easy now with the current tooling. All a moderator needs to do is simply create a new edit without the sensitive data, and then delete the previous revision. I have seen cases of keys and tokens as well, and in previous years it took a lot more work than it does now to remove them. If the case were in the instance of the sensitive information also existing in an answer, editing it out would be trivial, if warranted. – Travis J Jul 30 '17 at 7:32
62

I'm Alexander O'Mara (candidate link), and I'll try to keep this short for you.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

No, I do not delete the question. By posting the question, the user has already licensed the content to Stack Exchange under CC-BY-SA. It's the user's responsibility to sort out whatever trouble they may have caused by posting the content.

  1. Say you just performed a simple moderator action, like closing a question and leaving a comment explaining why. The question's owner disagrees with your decision, flags your comment as "no longer needed" and replies with a comment that should be flagged as "rude or abusive". Do you handle the situation yourself or do you wait for another mod to clean up? If you handle it yourself, do you just dismiss their flag, delete their comment and move on or do take further action?

Obviously you don't want to become the bully here. However, I believe there is some objectively fair action the moderator can take in such a situation.

If the comment is not in any way a reasonably response, I don't see any reasons any moderator should delay deleting it.

Likewise, in any situation where any user leaves a comment explaining why they voted to close a question, it doesn't really make sense to remove that comment unless the question is re-opened. Dismissing that flag also seems like a reasonable course of action for any moderator to take.

Of course, the example here assumes some givens. In practice, a situation may not be so simple. If the user's comment is mostly rational, the rude/abusive portion could instead be edited out, and a discussion had instead.

  1. Someone uses a custom flag to ask for a question to be migrated to another site. You're not a member of the target site. How do you decide whether or not to migrate the question?

This is a delicate situation. The last thing anyone wants is a rejected migration, not only would that annoy the target site, they also make a mess of things with stubs hanging around indefinitely.

I would only migrate it myself, if I was darn sure it would be on-topic on the target site. Tools I might use to determine this would be reading the target site's help center, and searching for similar questions.

Otherwise I would utilize the tools available to contact a moderator on the target site, and let them determine if they would like the question sent their way.

  1. Given a question that's closed as a duplicate of a fairly popular question (say a score of 10+, with multiple decent answers having a score of 5+), a gold tag badge user comes along, single-handedly reopens it and posts an answer that doesn't really differ that much from the ones in the duplicate. The answer or question is flagged by a user who disagrees with the reopening, stating the answer merely duplicates content already present on the site. What do you do?

If it's not a topic I'm familiar with and don't have much evidence of abuse, I'd be willing to give the gold tag badge holder the benefit of the doubt, and ask them why they took such action. It's possible there is some crucial detail I missed.

If there is evidence of repeat abuse, perhaps provided by the flag, then I would open a discussion with the user, to help show them why reopening duplicate questions to post duplicate answers is not what they should be doing with their gold tag bad privileges.

In any case, I would mark the flag as helpful.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

I think is a good example of my fair and decisive decision making:

An example of handling a situation where the user appears somewhat upset:

I'm also proud of my first Meta post, which showcases the dangers of snap judgements:

I'm also somewhat proud of this answer, which offers a resource for those accused of being the downvoter:

I'm also somewhat proud of these Meta posts, but not really for moderation reasons:

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

This is a somewhat delicate situation. When their criticism is rational and constructive, I'm totally fine with that, and those can be handled on a case-by-case basis.

If there are cases where a rational understanding cannot be reached, as this example suggests, then it gets more challenging. Fortunately there are bunch of users on Meta and a team of moderators, who can help to sort it out, and would hopefully be willing to tell me if I'm the problem.

  1. Moderators are expected to spend only 30 mins of their time, but we all know that 30 mins is insufficient. There are 2100 flags per day in the queue, a few of them needing 10~15 minutes. Most moderators spend way more than 30 mins and a few spend hours together. Would you be able to scale up your work time when the demand increases?

I usually spend much more than 30 minutes a day on this site, and am fairly flexible most of the time. This should not be a problem for me. Worst-case scenario, I spend a little less time on some of the other Stack Exchange sites I visit.

  1. Due to your status and actions as moderator and no matter how reasonable your conduct, you will be personally insulted more frequently, will have your competence questioned more publicly, and will be more exposed to negative sentiments. How will you cope with this negative pressure long-term when it comes from many users?

I don't think there is anything someone on the internet could say or do that would be worse than relatives in my own family. Let them try, I'm pretty thick-skinned.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Nobody is above the be nice policy. The first course of action, regardless of their contributions, would be to address the behavior with the user. I find that most people on this site actually are reasonable people. If the problem persists, then light moderator action can be employed, followed by heavier action only if needed.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

Most-likely it wasn't closed/deleted/etc on a whim, so the first thing to do before taking further action would be to understand the situation. I would talk to the other moderator, to get their perspective, so we could come to a consensus on the right course of action on question.


Questions or concerns? Post a comment! I want to hear from you!

60

I'm Rob! Please see my nomination here

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

For this scenario in particular: no. There are very few acceptable reasons to delete content merely because the author decides they no longer want it in the public domain. Once the content has been authored; it's public and is licensed to Stack Exchange. Further, there are countless crawlers and bots scraping Stack Exchange, so merely removing it from the site wouldn't necessarily purge it from public view.

In my opinion, the only situation where it may be acceptable to completely remove the post would be if personally identifiable information or extremely sensitive credentials had been posted. However, I'd much prefer the post to survive and have the personal content or credentials edited out and the history redacted, instead.

  1. Say you just performed a simple moderator action, like closing a question and leaving a comment explaining why. The question's owner disagrees with your decision, flags your comment as "no longer needed" and replies with a comment that should be flagged as "rude or abusive". Do you handle the situation yourself or do you wait for another mod to clean up? If you handle it yourself, do you just dismiss their flag, delete their comment and move on or do take further action?

I'm sure there will be plently of cases where users take actions against their content personally.
In regards to the flag on my comment; I'd leave it to another moderator. I strongly believe in handling flags impartially, regardless of how sure I am that I'm in the right. I'd never handle a flag which involved myself.

However, rude and offensive content is unacceptable regardless of circumstance. I'd remove their comment immediately; it has no place on the site. If the comment were merely critical of my actions, I'd leave it in place to be handled by another moderator if indeed it does require handling.

  1. Someone uses a custom flag to ask for a question to be migrated to another site. You're not a member of the target site. How do you decide whether or not to migrate the question?
  1. First, of course - would be to verify that the question is actually a question. Is there a clear goal? Has the author explained what problem they're having? Is there a possible answer to the question? If all's well and good, we'd continue to:
  2. Is the question actually off-topic for the current site? There's often plenty of overlap between exchange sites. Just because a question may be on topic for Super User, doesn't mean the question is off-topic for Stack Overflow. Now, assuming that it is off topic for StackOverflow...
  3. I'd read the target site's help centre. Now's the perfect time to become aquainted with the target site, as this surely won't be the last migration flag I'll come across for that target site.
    Does the question fall within the scope of the site? Does the question adhere to all the guidelines laid out? Are there similar types of questions already on the target site?
  4. If after all this, I find myself unable to come to an obvious conclusion; I'd ask. No one is expected to be an expert in all areas, and it's usually a good idea to ask someone rather than taking a stab in the dark. The Teacher's Room (I'm assuming), would be a suitable place to ask; hopefully getting a response from one of the moderators of the target site.
  5. If after all this, I couldn't make a decision I'd be happy to defend on Meta, I'd skip the flag and leave it for another moderator. I'd make a note to re-visit the flag to see what action was taken, and keep it in mind for next time.
  1. Given a question that's closed as a duplicate of a fairly popular question (say a score of 10+, with multiple decent answers having a score of 5+), a gold tag badge user comes along, single-handedly reopens it and posts an answer that doesn't really differ that much from the ones in the duplicate. The answer or question is flagged by a user who disagrees with the reopening, stating the answer merely duplicates content already present on the site. What do you do?

I tend to err on the side of assuming that users are trying to do the right thing. Someone with a gold badge, presumably, knows a little bit about the area of expertise around the question. There may be some subtle difference between the two questions that people unfamiliar with the tag may not notice.

I'd leave a comment on their answer, asking them to explain the difference between their answer, and the answers found in the ex-duplicate target, and why they felt the question should have been re-opened.

I'd then check the user's past behaviour to see if this is a common occurance. Are they regularly answering questions they've reopened, with answers very similar to the ones found in the target post? Have they had flags in the past raised against them?

If this is common behaviour, I'd issue them with a warning, asking them to please use their moderation priviledges responsibly. While it's extremely useful having the entire community share the burden of moderation, it's not constructive to have users incorrectly wielding their tools.

If the user continues with such behaviour, I'd escalate the action taken on them appropriately.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

While I'm quite active on meta in general (I visit it basically every day), I do not have much participation in terms of questions and answers. Most of my participation is either via comments, or involving bug reports / site feedback. I enjoy visiting it to keep up with the community consensus of appropriate flagging and moderation, moreso than actively participating.

Unfortunately, I do not have many strong meta posts which represent my moderation style. I do, however, plan to become more visibly active on meta.

You're free to browse my activity stream on meta for an idea of how I conduct myself.

These posts are not related to moderation style, but do provide an insight into how I present myself:

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

From my experience, every moderator will experience some form of backlash during their term. I'm happy to recieve any feedback, as long as the feedback is constructive.

If a user is writing constructively made posts with examples regarding my moderation... and they have enough content to make these nearly every day, that would indeed be a problem. That is, the fact that I'd made so many mistakes in my moderation duties to allow those posts to exist would be the problem.

For cases where'd I'd made an incorrect judgement, I'd make sure to educate myself on the proper way to handle such situations; either in private in the moderator room, or via meta. I'd endeavor to make sure the same mistake isn't made twice.

For cases where I'd taken incorrect action by accident, I'd own up to it straight away. No one's infallible, and it's better to admit fault rather than to pretend it never happened, especially if it's upset a user to the point that they've made a meta post. If I'm continually making avoidable mistakes, and I'd hope this wouldn't ever happen, I'd take a short day or two break from moderating to rest, and hopefully return with fewer-to-no mistakes in the future.

For posts which are truly rants, I'd expect the community to quickly handle such posts by closing them off as off-topic, which is a regular occurance. I, however, would not personally handle the post, unless it were content which would warrant a rude/abusive flag.

  1. Moderators are expected to spend only 30 mins of their time, but we all know that 30 mins is insufficient. There are 2100 flags per day in the queue, a few of them needing 10~15 minutes. Most moderators spend way more than 30 mins and a few spend hours together. Would you be able to scale up your work time when the demand increases?

I'm lucky to have a bit of downtime at work, and I spend most of my free time browsing/moderating Stack Overflow and occasionally, other Stack Exchange sites (mostly spam reports). I'm quite flexible, and if the need does arise for a bit of extra work in moderating, I'd happily step up. I'm typically far less active on weekends, though I do usually have the site open at home, and would be able to lend a hand.

  1. Due to your status and actions as moderator and no matter how reasonable your conduct, you will be personally insulted more frequently, will have your competence questioned more publicly, and will be more exposed to negative sentiments. How will you cope with this negative pressure long-term when it comes from many users?

As an Aussie, I've got a pretty thick skin. Rarely do things get to me. I've experienced the above performing regular moderation duties; I've no doubt I'd manage to not let them get to me.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

This doesn't seem to be very uncommon, unfortunately. However, everyone here is treated equally, regardless of their amount of reputation, or the quality of their posts. If they were to break the be nice policy, they'd be met with the same action as anyone else:
A warning, followed by suspensions and escalated as necessary.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I'd contact them privately (that is, in the Teacher's Room) asking them why they chose to perform the action they did. From my experience, moderators have been more than willing to own up to their mistakes, and have no issue reverting an action performed incorrectly. And if their decision was correct, then it's a lesson learned for me!

  • With regards to #9 - would that risk losing their contributions? – EJoshuaS Jul 24 '17 at 14:31
  • 1
    @EJoshuaS For contributions already made; no. They're licensed to SE and there's already a heavy precedent set against self-vandalizing and removing posts en masse. If it means they won't be contributing in the future, that'd be a shame, but it's absolutely unacceptable to be rude and hostile in comments, regardless of the quality of their contributions. – Rob Jul 24 '17 at 23:20
49

I'm Tiny Giant, and these are my answers to your questions.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

This depends on the situation. If they have disclosed confidential information, I would initiate the process to redact the revision. Otherwise, I would decline the flag with a custom message explaining that the content is licensed to Stack Overflow, that we do not delete content for that reason, and that they can request dissociation from their post.

  1. Say you just performed a simple moderator action, like closing a question and leaving a comment explaining why. The question's owner disagrees with your decision, flags your comment as "no longer needed" and replies with a comment that should be flagged as "rude or abusive". Do you handle the situation yourself or do you wait for another mod to clean up? If you handle it yourself, do you just dismiss their flag, delete their comment and move on or do take further action?

I would immediately flag the rude or abusive comment as rude or abusive (causing instant deletion of the comment IIRC), then defer to another moderator if possible, otherwise I would handle it as best I could given the specific situation.

  1. Someone uses a custom flag to ask for a question to be migrated to another site. You're not a member of the target site. How do you decide whether or not to migrate the question?

I would first make sure that the question is off-topic for Stack Overflow. Then I would review the help center and meta on the target site to help determine if it might be on-topic there. If so, I would look for similar questions and how they were received, while also looking for duplicates. Finally I would ask a moderator from the target site or in a moderation related chat room whether they wanted it or not.

If any of these checks failed I would decline the flag, otherwise I would migrate the question.

  1. Given a question that's closed as a duplicate of a fairly popular question (say a score of 10+, with multiple decent answers having a score of 5+), a gold tag badge user comes along, single-handedly reopens it and posts an answer that doesn't really differ that much from the ones in the duplicate. The answer or question is flagged by a user who disagrees with the reopening, stating the answer merely duplicates content already present on the site. What do you do?

I would enter as a neutral party and ask the gold badge holder for clarification on the difference between their answer and the previously provided answers on the target. Depending on their response I would either: attempt to explain why that behavior is discouraged, close the question, approve the flag, and move on; or I would delete the exchange and decline the flag. If the situation required further moderation, I would address that at that point.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

To name a few:

Should I delete my answer if the answer is "No, this is not possible"?

What's better: a question with no attempt or with an unfixable/irrelevant attempt?

If the author says it's not an answer, can we take their word for it?

What to do when I find a user suggesting a large number of trivial edits?

Is it okay for a single user to edit all the posts (A question and all its answers)?

But there are too many to mention here

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

I would attempt to start a private conversation with the user and another moderator (in the position of an impartial mediator) to attempt to defuse the situation and see if we could come to an understanding.

  1. Moderators are expected to spend only 30 mins of their time, but we all know that 30 mins is insufficient. There are 2100 flags per day in the queue, a few of them needing 10~15 minutes. Most moderators spend way more than 30 mins and a few spend hours together. Would you be able to scale up your work time when the demand increases?

Absolutely. I regularly spend more than that amount of time moderating Stack Overflow right now.

  1. Due to your status and actions as moderator and no matter how reasonable your conduct, you will be personally insulted more frequently, will have your competence questioned more publicly, and will be more exposed to negative sentiments. How will you cope with this negative pressure long-term when it comes from many users?

I'm sure I will handle the increase in insults and publicity of the questioning of my competence fairly well. The important thing is to step back and defer to other moderators when necessary. If I make a mistake, it is important to not only own up to that but to learn from it as well.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

I would first review the history of previous moderator interaction with the user. Then I would move on to reviewing the most recent arguments/flags from comments. Then it would depend entirely on the severity of the situation, and how receptive they were to moderation interaction. I may end up involving another moderator, I may sending the user a mod message, I may initiate a private chat, or whatever moderation action the specific situation desired.

The bottom line is: providing useful answers doesn't make you immune from "Be Nice"

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I would discuss the situation with the moderator and another moderator as an impartial third party, in order to come to a better understanding without conflict. If an understanding was unreachable, I would probably move on.

  • 1
    There have been circumstances in which a user has posted sensitive credentials to this site, or has posted top-secret code, and have asked for it to be deleted/removed. While I realize that this is slightly different than what #1 was posing, it falls under the same scope - will get them in trouble at work. Would you still reject their request for removal? – Makoto Jul 18 '17 at 3:09
  • 3
    @Makoto I have updated my post to answer your clarification request. – Tiny Giant Jul 18 '17 at 5:26
48

I am vaultah, and these are my answers.

My nomination


  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

According to this answer, all content users post on Stack Overflow is "perpetually and irrevocably licensed to Stack Exchange under the Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike license". This gives Stack Overflow (the company) the right to use it in practically any way they see fit, and the policy is to avoid deleting useful content.

I would first check whether the personally identifiable information can be removed from the question and its answers while preserving the original meaning, since in most cases it should be both possible and sufficient. Diamond moderators also have the ability to delete edit history, to hide the fact that such edit took place. That said, this will hide that data from the eyes of future visitors of Stack Overflow, but countless real-time scrapers and the Wayback Machine may keep it indefinitely.

The question owner may send a disassociation request, whereas (depending on the circumstances) representatives of schools and employers may want to send a complete takedown notice, but handling of such requests falls outside of the jurisdiction of diamond moderators.

  1. Say you just performed a simple moderator action, like closing a question and leaving a comment explaining why. The question's owner disagrees with your decision, flags your comment as "no longer needed" and replies with a comment that should be flagged as "rude or abusive". Do you handle the situation yourself or do you wait for another mod to clean up? If you handle it yourself, do you just dismiss their flag, delete their comment and move on or do take further action?

First, most flags on posts and comments posted by moderators should be handled by other moderators.

Second, considering the possibility that my decision might be later deemed incorrect, attempts to suppress the disagreement with my moderator privileges are going to look very bad. However, I might delete a comment that very clearly violates the Be Nice policy.

I would wait for another moderator to review my actions and perform a clean-up, if needed.

  1. Someone uses a custom flag to ask for a question to be migrated to another site. You're not a member of the target site. How do you decide whether or not to migrate the question?

Unless the question is utter garbage ("Don't migrate crap"), I'll take time to read and understand site-specific sections in the help center on the target site. Some SE sites even have Meta posts explicitly stating the rules for migrations ("A guide to Code Review for Stack Overflow users"). As a last resort, I will drop into the "general discussion" chat room (most sites have them) and ask for advice.

If I can't arrive to a conclusion, I will let another moderator handle the flag -- it's always best to back off in the face of uncertainty.

  1. Given a question that's closed as a duplicate of a fairly popular question (say a score of 10+, with multiple decent answers having a score of 5+), a gold tag badge user comes along, single-handedly reopens it and posts an answer that doesn't really differ that much from the ones in the duplicate. The answer or question is flagged by a user who disagrees with the reopening, stating the answer merely duplicates content already present on the site. What do you do?

The user might have done that in good faith: it's not uncommon for duplicate targets to cover questions only partially. If the posted answer has bits that are relevant to the question, but weren't addressed previously, I would say it's acceptable. (then again, they could have added another duplicate link to cover the specifics)

Otherwise the usefulness of their answer is questionable, and it might warrant a downvote, comment, or even mod message and further escalation (if they kept doing this for a while).

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

No, I'm afraid not. OTOH, I have had several duplicate feature requests and bug reports that I did not post. There were a few insignificant burnination requests that I didn't start, and many unproductive discussions and heated debates in which I chose not to participate.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

I don't mind constructive criticism, even if all of their posts are directed at me.

Rants on the other hand may be indicative of personal scorn. I'd consider inviting them to a private on-site room to find out the cause. In the meantime, I'll ask fellow moderators to respond.

  1. Moderators are expected to spend only 30 mins of their time, but we all know that 30 mins is insufficient. There are 2100 flags per day in the queue, a few of them needing 10~15 minutes. Most moderators spend way more than 30 mins and a few spend hours together. Would you be able to scale up your work time when the demand increases?

Yes. There are circumstances that will cause my availability to drop (finals), but overall I have a lot of time to moderate on both weekdays and weekends.

  1. Due to your status and actions as moderator and no matter how reasonable your conduct, you will be personally insulted more frequently, will have your competence questioned more publicly, and will be more exposed to negative sentiments. How will you cope with this negative pressure long-term when it comes from many users?

I'm not at all concerned about that. NSFW image boards desensitised me, and I don't expect any insults to get to me or affect my decision-making.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Despite being a valuable contributor, they seem to violate one of the more important site rules, requiring all users to "be nice". I would start with a comment or mod message, followed by a series of increasingly long suspensions, if they continue.

One contributor does not compensate for the forthcoming damage to the site reputation that may follow as a (indirect) result of their actions.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I definitely won't confront them publicly. As I see it, the team of moderators is supposed to behave as a whole, with no apparent contradictions or public arguments between its members. I'll ask them about their reasoning in the "blue room" and listen to feedback from other moderators.

However, if it's decided that the action was inappropriate and the moderator has a long history of improper actions, I'll have to pass it on to community managers.

  • 2
    While I seem to like your credentials, and your answers seem fairly sensible and well-metered, I wonder if the lack of overall Meta participation is what's impacting you here. – Makoto Jul 19 '17 at 19:04
  • 22
    I'm still not convinced Meta participation is an absolute must for a moderator candidate. – Pekka 웃 Jul 19 '17 at 22:37
  • 15
    @Pekka웃 I don't thinks mods to need to have active participation but they should be lurking to keep up with how the community is growing. That way things like this don't happen. – NathanOliver Jul 20 '17 at 14:42
  • 9
    Demanding active meta participation from mods is dangerously close to saying that only members of a crony group should be mods. Lurking is enough. Criticism about non-meta participation makes me uncomfortable. – S List Jul 21 '17 at 8:17
  • 10
    For the record, I can't describe my Meta participation as active, but I consider myself more than a lurker. I'm here literally every day ("visited 1100 days, 447 consecutive"), I've made a few posts, and I regularly read Hot Meta Posts and related Q&A. – vaultah Jul 22 '17 at 16:42
-16

Johnny Bones here, and below are my answers to the questionnaire.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

No, I will not delete the question. Once a question is posted, it no longer belongs solely to the OP. The user has a few options, among them is to have the question disassociated with their username, which is the path I would direct the user to take.

  1. Say you just performed a simple moderator action, like closing a question and leaving a comment explaining why. The question's owner disagrees with your decision, flags your comment as "no longer needed" and replies with a comment that should be flagged as "rude or abusive". Do you handle the situation yourself or do you wait for another mod to clean up? If you handle it yourself, do you just dismiss their flag, delete their comment and move on or do take further action?

Over on Music Fans, we would go into the mod chat room and point out the issue, and ask someone else to step in. Having a 3rd party weigh in has a much better impact on the disagreement, and shows unity among moderators.

  1. Someone uses a custom flag to ask for a question to be migrated to another site. You're not a member of the target site. How do you decide whether or not to migrate the question?

As a moderator, it is your duty to understand the sites and make decisions as to which site is a better fit for a question.

  1. Given a question that's closed as a duplicate of a fairly popular question (say a score of 10+, with multiple decent answers having a score of 5+), a gold tag badge user comes along, single-handedly reopens it and posts an answer that doesn't really differ that much from the ones in the duplicate. The answer or question is flagged by a user who disagrees with the reopening, stating the answer merely duplicates content already present on the site. What do you do?

I would delete the answer and leave a comment under it such as, "This answer is being deleted because it adds nothing to the already posted answers."

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

Yes, on Music Fans we had a question dealing with plagiarism. I feel I handled it pretty well.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

I believe that Meta allows for self-correction. If the user is ranting and no one is agreeing, then it's obviously a personal issue that the user needs to sort out. If Meta is agreeing with the user, then there is obviously something wrong with my approach and I might ask other mods if they have suggestions to improve my moderation skills.

  1. Moderators are expected to spend only 30 mins of their time, but we all know that 30 mins is insufficient. There are 2100 flags per day in the queue, a few of them needing 10~15 minutes. Most moderators spend way more than 30 mins and a few spend hours together. Would you be able to scale up your work time when the demand increases?

I work from home and I live alone. I have no issues whatsoever with dedicating more time to Stack Overflow if that need arises.

  1. Due to your status and actions as moderator and no matter how reasonable your conduct, you will be personally insulted more frequently, will have your competence questioned more publicly, and will be more exposed to negative sentiments. How will you cope with this negative pressure long-term when it comes from many users?

Very few things bother me. I used to work for a small bond trading company where the owners were involved on a daily basis and if anything went wrong we were verbally abused in front of co-workers. Yes, that's the truth. I've learned not to take things personally, one things I always tell co-workers if they want to approach an application development project from a different angle than the one I've chosen is, "Don't worry about bruising my ego, I have none to bruise."

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

I would remind them that, regardless of contributions there is still a basic principle that all Stack Overflow users must be nice to each other. If the subtle warning didn't help matters, then a short suspension should help correct the situation.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

On Music Fans, I've asked other mods what their reasoning was for actions such as this, and if I didn't agree with them then I've offered my reasons for such. Mods tend to be level-headed, and a compromise usually isn't that hard to achieve via chat.

  • 24
    I see that you often mention Music Fans on your questionnaire, but i'm not a member in that community. Also, please correct me if i'm wrong - You don't seem to be an active member in Meta SO discussions (Your last activity, apart from election related posts, is from Sep 16). I must say that this bothers me a little bit. – Alon Eitan Jul 18 '17 at 12:21
  • 3
    I notice that you also moderate Music Fans SE; do you think that that would create any conflicts (e.g. that it might be too time-consuming trying to moderate two sites at once)? How do you think that moderating SO differs from moderating that site? – EJoshuaS Jul 18 '17 at 15:38
  • 4
    @EJoshuaS - Honestly, MF requires very little of my time. It's microscopic compared to SO. I mention moderation there only because A) I obviously have access to moderator tools so I'm familiar with them, and B) I've dealt with a few people who have gone off the rails. I've got experience with handling some of the issues that will come up. – Johnny Bones Jul 18 '17 at 17:11
  • 32
    Once a question is posted, it belongs to Stack Overflow. That is simply false. Posting something to SO does not in any way give up ownership of that content. It is licensing the content in such every in the world (including SO) has the right to host the content, so long as it's attributed to you (and some other stuff, see the licence terms for details). – Servy Jul 18 '17 at 21:39
  • 8
    Instead of explaining your answers, you mention Music Fans every single time. It would help if you could expand your answers. – ajay Jul 19 '17 at 6:59
  • 54
    @Rotwang I don't agree with the delete votes here. You aren't deleting the nomination, you are deleting the candidates answers to questions. These answers give an indication how they would handle situations as a moderator. Deleting it makes it more difficult for the community to judge how they would behave as a moderator. – Taryn Jul 20 '17 at 16:52
  • 14
    All I can say, is I originally was not keen to have @JohnnyBones as a mod, but I've watched how he's remained calm in the face of so much critical feedback, seeing his answer here be delete voted and I think he would actually make a decent moderator. We beed people who can remain calm and objective. +1 – Yvette Colomb Jul 21 '17 at 3:13
  • 5
    There's an old saying that goes, "Actions speak louder than words." I hope my actions help prove that I'm moderator quality. – Johnny Bones Jul 21 '17 at 12:01
  • 4
    I like your style of handling the hate. Have an upvote. – DMrFrost Jul 23 '17 at 23:16
  • 1
    I notice that you also moderate Music Fans SE; do you think that that would create any conflicts (e.g. that it might be too time-consuming trying to moderate two sites at once)? How do you think that moderating SO differs from moderating that site? – mayur panchal Jul 25 '17 at 13:21
  • @ajay I think if OP mentions Music Fans because he can give us an example to prove he had experience in that question, then it's OK. – User2012384 Jul 26 '17 at 6:42
  • @User2012384 Fair enough. Sorry if I sounded a bit harsh. It was just a genuine question. – ajay Jul 26 '17 at 8:36
  • I've missed you at this year's election - at least pop into the chat and say hi :D – Yvette Colomb Mar 16 '18 at 20:52

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