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I sometimes tend to give lengthy answers following the pattern, that they first describe the minimal changes necessary to the OPs program to get things to work, followed by one or more alternative solutions (that might be shorter, faster, more maintainable, etc.).

Recently, after getting my answer accepted without further comment from the OP, I realized that future visitors will have no clue which of the (originally three, now four) solutions, presented in the answer, the OP actually used.

A further complication is that I could not test the OPs problems completely, and that an update to the last solution in the answer I provided (edited from a simpler but less flexible one, before acceptance) might actually not work. I rolled that back, and provided fourth solution (based on updates in the library involved).

Future visitors will see an accepted answer (unless it gets unaccepted), but they have no indication which of the solutions was actually taken by the OP. It might be the first one the OP tried (not necessarily the first solution in the answer) and that the rest not even tested by the OP (and thus might not work for her/him).

Should I split such an answer up in multiple answers, each with one solution, so that it is clear which solution was taken once an answer is accepted?

That would provide some challenges to keep answers relate to each other. Common assumptions, as described at the top of a single—multiple solution—answer, would either need repeating, or well referenced (by links to the other answer for the same question) in the solution that becomes the second (third, etc) answer. This to keep the premise that each answer on its own provides a valid and complete answer. Reading through answers that are separated this way is always somewhat less convenient than a single cohesive answer, especially since sorting by votes easily jumbles them.

Or should I just number/tag the various possible solutions in a single answer, and ask the OP which solution was taken (assuming and once accepted)? This will result in that information, if provided, being hidden in a comment.


I am normally not suggesting the OP to try out multiple things with the solutions until one is found that works, something discussed in this questions. The various solutions I provide should all work, but might not appeal to the OP's taste, or might not be less understandable (using unfamiliar syntax etc).

  • Before anyone asks, this is the answer that triggered this question. – Anthon Jul 16 '17 at 7:22
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    "Recently, after getting my answer accepted without further comment from the OP, I realized that future visitors will have no clue which of the (originally three, now four) solutions, presented in the answer, the OP actually used. " - That doesn't matter much when the fixed code and the alternative solutions are all working. Just because OP used solution A, it doesn't mean that the future visitor should use that as well. Splitting the answers just "hides" other solutions when one of the answers has been ticked to the top of all answers. So I wouldn't split the answer. – Tom Jul 16 '17 at 7:35
  • "if the alternative solutions are working". As I indicated, because I could not test with the exact setup of the OP, there is no way of knowing whether that is true or not. – Anthon Jul 16 '17 at 8:28
  • And you can write that into your answer above the specific solution, so everyone knows that this one might be flawed, but there are suitable alternatives. – Tom Jul 16 '17 at 10:17

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