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I just got done reading this:

What is Stack Overflow’s goal?

And I thought. Wow - right on! For example in the past this type of question would have been OK:

What is the difference between :focus and :active?

But this is no longer acceptable. You have to show work. In the above case, that would have diluted the question, thus wasting the time of all the readers who find the question and answer useful. That is not a concern for the moderators who are now cracking down on these types of questions.

For example here is a question I recently asked that the moderators have taken a sledge hammer too:

enter image description here

Long term I think this "Users who don't show work are a bunch of lazy losers" attitude and "Why does everything have to exist on Stack Overflow?" judgement call by moderators is going to be detrimental to Stack Overflow's business model. Everything does not have to exist on SO but why when a person is willing to ask and others are happy to answer - almost always within a five minute time frame - does a moderator get to crack down on the question?.

So I'm requesting that Stack Overflow create a replay feature. We have it in soccer nets, hockey nets, the NFL has the ability to review plays. Here's how it should work.

"This post has been closed by BillTheLizard for this reason". If you feel this is unfair please follow these steps to build a case for it. That includes reviewing all the closings and other activity by BillTheLizard to see how good a referee BillTheLizard is. This can then be submitted to metareviews.stackoverflow.com. And you can let a user have like 3 chances to do this. Same protocol we use in the NHL or NFL or any other sport where a coach can ask for a play review

Some are saying this will make no difference from a purely logical point of view. It will. And the reason is simple. Stack Overflow is trying something that addresses the needs of all of us, and that's enough. For more info read up on the Hawthorne studies:

Hawthorne Studies

References

If you look at the comments there are a lot of people that think that there is no need for this type of feature because moderators are only contributing positively to stackoverflow. These articles all say otherwise:

  • 30
    You obviously have no idea. First of all its not moderators that close questions, its any 5 normal users that can close a question. And secondly if you allow a free for all on questions the you end up with a cesspit like yahoo answers or expertsexchange (thats in theory - in practice it is however too late, the flood of rubbish questions like this one of yours has already long since ruined the quality of stackoverflow: stackoverflow.com/questions/44832572/…). – JK. Jul 14 '17 at 5:26
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    Are you still salty about that one time Ryan closed your question? – BoltClock Jul 14 '17 at 5:28
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    But until we can agree on what's good for users, that still won't help. You appear to think that a far more permissive policy would be good for users, whereas many of us disagree - hence the reaction to any Meta question suggesting that SO should be more lax on its quality standards. Note that your final sentence sounds like you think a question being closed is equivalent to being deleted - it's not. The point of closing a question is to encourage the original poster to respond by improving the question so it can be reopened. – Jon Skeet Jul 14 '17 at 5:54
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    And as you say, when you google a computer problem you very often get a link to SO with a good and relevant answer. Maybe that's a consequence of how SO works? – Broman Jul 14 '17 at 6:12
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    @Ole: no, it is a consequence of optimising for pearls; we keep a tight focus on questions that are likely to help future visitors. – Martijn Pieters Jul 14 '17 at 6:48
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    @Ole: the oyster is the site, we receive plenty of questions. Loads of them get rejected because they turn out not to be pearl material. Nothing of this is new, we have been doing this for years now, and the success of the site has only grown. It turns out the strategy has been working. – Martijn Pieters Jul 14 '17 at 6:52
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    @Ole: knock yourself out: data.stackexchange.com, closure events are included. – Martijn Pieters Jul 14 '17 at 6:55
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    maybe it's a consequence of allowing people to ask questions and receive answers if that were true, Yahoo Answers and Amazon's Askville would have been resounding successes. – Pekka 웃 Jul 14 '17 at 7:00
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    So in other words SO has instilled the moderators with a crystal ball that allows them within a 5 minute time frame to make a decision on what will be useful to future visitors yes - a set of rules. Imperfect, as we all know, and no crystal ball, but a workable toolbox. Just like in any community, there's rules that govern what people can do and how they can interact with each other. You don't have a vote every time a house party on your block goes past midnight; the community has created a rule deciding to what extent it'll allow nighttime parties, and that rule is then enforced. – Pekka 웃 Jul 14 '17 at 7:03
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    Then they look around and see 100 other parties that were not busted and go WAIT! WHAT???? they're usually looking at Facebook and Instagram posts of parties that were had a year ago, and forgetting to look at the date. – Pekka 웃 Jul 14 '17 at 15:01
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    @Ole The information is all public, you can see it, you've been linked to the data sources. As to the enforcement, yes, you're right that not all of the content that violates site policies gets cleaned up (or gets cleaned up promptly). It's an unfortunate reality that there are more people interested in providing bad content than there are people willing and able to clean it up, so as a result, not all of the trash ends up being thrown out. We do the best we can. If you have ideas of ways of more efficiently cleaning up the trash, by all means, propose them. – Servy Jul 14 '17 at 15:07
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    Perversely, SO gets a lot of accusations and hate for closing questions because it is so transparent about its actions. I know no other major site that is even remotely this transparent. On normal megasites like Facebook or Twitter, there's an army of censors that do nothing but delete stuff 24/7, with zero community oversight, but because the activity is invisible, it's much harder to get worked up about it. On SO, real people do the moderating. It's easy to hate on real people and call them Gestapo or whatnot. On FB and elsewhere, nobody gives a shit about what you think. – Pekka 웃 Jul 14 '17 at 15:10
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    @Ole If you're going to assert that moderators are abusively closing questions they know don't merit closure because of personal vendettas 20 to 30 percent of the time then you're going to need to back that up. I've never seen a case of it ever. There are plenty of places where people disagree over whether a particular question crosses the line, or where the line is, or even where someone simply makes a mistake and misunderstands a question (or misclicks), but the abuse you're asserting is extremely common is something I haven't even seen once, and it's a very serious accusation. – Servy Jul 14 '17 at 16:21
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    Please stop spamming your question with edits and comments. You're continually bumping it without adding anything new to the question. You've made your case, the community will vote (or not) to reopen your question over time. Nobody is taking any action against your question to keep it closed, I'm not sure what you think is happening there but edits don't reopen your question if that's your thinking. – meagar Jul 14 '17 at 17:13
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    I've asked you repeatedly to stop bumping your post with spammy edits. If you want to include relevant supporting information then do so, but collecting random anti-Stack Overflow links from around the Internet is not relevant here. These pages are years old and have been discussed ad nauseum. Please limit yourself to substantial edits and stop making small irrelevant changes. – meagar Jul 16 '17 at 5:12
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And I thought. Wow - right on! For example in the past this type of question would have been OK:

What is the difference between :focus and :active?

But this is no longer acceptable. You have to show work. In the above case, that would have diluted the question, thus wasting the time of all the readers who find the question and answer useful. That is not a concern for the moderators who are now cracking down on these types of questions.

Personally, I believe that question is a perfectly reasonable question that totally belongs here on SO. And I don't see why Pure CSS Dropdown That's Clickable? should be any different.

Yes, these illustrate a total lack of experience in frontend web development, but that doesn't mean they aren't valid programming questions. Just because any experienced frontend developer would consider those pretty silly / ignorant question, that doesn't mean they're off topic.

Nor do they prove lack of effort on the side of the person raising the question. Some information is just hard to find, especially if the person looking is a n00b or the answer to be found is complicated. Heck, I don't think anyone would ask a question on SO if they would know a better place to get their answer. You can't just assume laziness just because YOU happen to know resources that can answer most n00b questions in less than 5 minutes and people somehow ended up not reading those first before they raised their question at SO.

If people have a programming issue that other people are likely to encounter as well, I don't see why a question addressing that issue should be closed just because it doesn't contain an arbitrarily determined amount of code. Nor do I see why questions of the time "is X possible" should illustrate coding effort.

Why should anyone have to waste hours trying to achieve something so he can somehow prove he's done enough effort before I can spend 30 seconds of my time to tell him that what he wants is impossible?! How helpful is that? How does that increase people's productivity? Because, really, isn't increasing either our own productivity or the productivity of others the very reason why people are supposed to be active on SO? Isn't this what SO is supposed to be all about?

To quote Niels Bohr : "An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made, in a narrow field." Many people on SO seem to have forgotten that they all were n00bs some time ago. We all made mistakes that we now consider utterly stupid & ignorant. And we all would have appreciated it a few senior programmers would have spent a few minutes of their precious time to educate us on some basic fundamentals of programming instead of letting us figure out everything on our own and waste hours - if not days or weeks - on dead ends.

Heck, it is my experience that the most useful questions tend to be questions that end up getting closed before anyone gets the chance to post an anwser. I mean... sometimes all you need is a direction to look at to help you get started, but you cannot ask that here because you must prove in some way that you've already started.

Or sometimes all you need is a framework or library to take care of the heavy lifting, but asking for external resources is not allowed here as well. And God forbid you ask a question similar to one already asked, but with only outdated or otherwise useless answers... God forbid!

So I'm requesting that Stackoverflow create a replay feature. We have it in soccer nets, hockey nets, the NFL has the ability to review plays. Here's how it should work.

"This post has been closed by BillTheLizard for this reason". If you feel this is unfair please follow these steps to build a case for it. That includes reviewing all the closings and other activity by BillTheLizard to see how good a referee BillTheLizard is. This can then be submitted to metareviews.stackoverflow.com. And you can let a user have like 3 chances to do this. Same protocol we use in the NHL or NFL or any other sport where a coach can ask for a play review

I'm not convinced that an "appeal system" like the one you're proposing can or will make difference. SO already has several ways to appeal against decisions made by other users :

  • people can raise an issue in the comments of a post
  • people can raise an issue on chat
  • people can flag a closed question to nominate it for re-opening
  • people can flag a deleted question to nominate it for undeletion
  • people can flag a question to call for moderator assistance
  • people can raise a question here on "meta" to discuss actions of other users
  • ...

Yet I'd agree it can be damn near impossible to get question re-opened or undeleted, even when they've been closed for the most questionable of reasons. But I don't think the problem is that there is no practical way to appeal the decisions of other users. I don't think the solution is to implement newer or better ways to appeal against the decisions made by other users. Personally, I think problem lays with the actual users making the decisions. I'd say it kinda boils down to "Who watches the Watchmen"...

In the long run, any set of rules and standards will only be as good as the people applying them. And during my time here on SO, I've come to the conclusion that...

  1. many of the rules on SO simply don't make sense and are counter-productive
  2. many of the rules that do make sense are too vague and open for interpretation
  3. many of the users policing SO apply the rules in ways that are totally unproductive
  4. many of those same users behave in a way that is elitist/arrogant, hostile or otherwise unpleasant for people who trying to engage with SO in a productive way, chasing them away
  5. the gamification mechanism that gives us our privileges often favors the wrong behavior, rewarding the wrong people and making aforementioned problems worse
  6. all of the above makes it nearly impossible for many real world programming questions to get answered on SO

People like myself and many others have been complaining about one or more of these issues over and over, ad nauseam. The moderators simply don't care, either because they see SO as "the worst form of Q&A system except all others" or because they simply don't see the problem from their ivory towers where everyone is congratulating each other on how great they're doing...

Eiher way, I can only see things getting worse and worse until the owners & administrators of SO acknowledge the aforementioned issues and address their root causes...

please create a set of key performance indicators that monitor the question, how fast a moderator cancels it or closes it, and whether anyone was allowed to respond before the moderator intervened. An aggregate public summary view of questions that moderators are closing would be great.

Anyone can create their own queries on Data.SE for that.

Here's some queries I created two years ago :

Feel free to use these queries (or any of my queries) as a starting point for pulling your own metrics!

  • 9
    And we all would have appreciated it a few senior programmers would have spent a few minutes of their precious time to educate us on some basic fundamentals of programming instead of letting us figure out everything on our own and waste hours - if not days or weeks - on dead ends. sure - but a million new programmers asking a couple thousand senior programmers simply isn't a sustainable model. I'm currently learning a couple new technologies and am making loads of mistakes. Part of them are because I've opted to just get started, rather than sit through.... – Pekka 웃 Jul 16 '17 at 14:28
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    ...a systematic fundamental education on the languages I need to learn; it's more economical for me this way because I can learn in bite-sized units during a busy work day. It would, however, never occur to me to offset the cost of that decision to someone else and start asking questions I can answer myself by Googling - or working through the fundamental basics after all. – Pekka 웃 Jul 16 '17 at 14:28
  • Incidentally though, I do find the question mentioned by the OP fairly reasonable - in its final edited form. It was not a good question in its original form and I would have downvoted it, too. – Pekka 웃 Jul 16 '17 at 14:31
  • @Pekka웃 - but a million new programmers asking a couple thousand senior programmers simply isn't a sustainable model - Maybe... maybe not... but it is how I would define the purpose of StackOverflow? *** it would never occur to me to offset the cost of that decision to someone else - In several years, I've raised only about 10 questions on SO and answered +500 questions. So, like you, I prefer to figure things out on my own - and I usually do - before I ask a question on SO. – John Slegers Jul 16 '17 at 14:32
  • but it is how I would define the purpose of StackOverflow? Well, many here wouldn't, at least not for every type of question a new programmer might have. And it's a sentiment that goes far beyond some perceived elite group - just watch what happens to candidates in moderator elections who promise to be super duper lenient. Like it or not, our continuously increasing strictness and narrowness is a product of the community, arguably not in sync with the wishes of even the people running the site - even Jeff was surprised by the direction the place's rules have taken since the site's inception. – Pekka 웃 Jul 16 '17 at 14:34
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    @JohnSlegers: "Why should anyone have to waste hours trying to achieve something so he can somehow prove he's done enough effort before I can spend 30 seconds of my time to tell him that what he wants is impossible?! How helpful is that?" Because it teaches them to be programmers. A programmer is someone who can solve problems. Copying a solution and pasting it into their program is not solving a problem. You're basically saying that, rather than disseminating knowledge, we should just be doing work for other people. That's teaching them to be bad programmers. – Nicol Bolas Jul 16 '17 at 14:40
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    @JohnSlegers don't entirely disagree with your description of the problem. I see too many (often new) people ask questions in very good faith and fail, too. It's not moderators's fault, though. There is a strong community consensus behind these things. Moderators just execute the policy with some, but definitely not unlimited, leeway. I don't like the extreme narrowness that we have, but am not sure what can be done about it. Overall, I lean very much towards the "worst form except all others" view. SO still manages to deliver quality content in many many cases. – Pekka 웃 Jul 16 '17 at 14:43
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    @JohnSlegers: "I find that sitting together with a senior dev" That's great; that's a wonderful way to get started with some new tech. SO is not the place for that sort of thing. It's not for interacting with a senior dev who slowly guides you through the new tech. You drop a question in a box, and some time later, an answer pops out. It's supposed to be completely impersonal. – Nicol Bolas Jul 16 '17 at 14:57
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    @JohnSlegers If you're here for the "thanks", you're here for the wrong reason. That's not what this site is for. We're a work of reference not an interactive tutorial site. – meagar Jul 16 '17 at 16:23
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    Why should anyone have to waste hours... Would it have really taken hours to produce a minimal version of the result of following the tutorial? Why is it so unreasonable to ask that people posting questions not force people trying to answer to start completely from scratch? – BSMP Jul 16 '17 at 21:41
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    @john Slegers greatly appreciate your well written and eloquent input. I think if SO has a tool that users can use to appeal what they see as "A poor judgement call" and build a review case that at least makes them feel better about SO as a whole. If you can make them feel better then that should drive a decrease in moderator flag alarms going off, and that should be really good for all of us. – Ole Jul 16 '17 at 22:51
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    @JohnSlegers: sure, but that doesn't mean Stack Overflow is the place for that. Stop assuming that it is and you'll have a much better time here. – Martijn Pieters Jul 17 '17 at 9:36
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    @JohnSlegers: stop painting the rules as arbitrary; they are pretty clear. We have a small number of closing reasons, and a narrow definition of what is on-topic. Stop assuming that when people disagree with you they are being elitist, arrogant or hostile (it is you that is coming over as hostile by using terminology like that). Not that I think you'll listen to me, I'm already part of the elite in your view anyway, right? – Martijn Pieters Jul 17 '17 at 10:05
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    @JohnSlegers: I'm sorry that you have found SO to be unhelpful for your questions. You appear to have plenty of well-received questions on your account. I don't see how the rules were hard to figure out for those that were closed; is it clear to you taht stackoverflow.com/questions/38803420/… is really too broad? – Martijn Pieters Jul 17 '17 at 10:17
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    @JohnSlegers: thanks for calling me an arrogant jerk. This is why people are not willing to help you or listen to you. – Martijn Pieters Jul 17 '17 at 10:17
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please create a set of key performance indicators that monitor the question, how fast a moderator cancels it or closes it, and whether anyone was allowed to respond before the moderator intervened. An aggregate public summary view of questions that moderators are closing would be great.

OK, let's say we do that. So you can look at a user's closing history to see how fast they close questions on average. You can see how many questions they voted to close which had answers on it. And so forth.

What exactly will that accomplish?

If a question deserves to be closed, then it deserves to be closed. Whether that happens 1 second after its posted, or 50 years later after dozens of people have answered it, it still deserves to be closed. Consequently, if a question doesn't deserve to be closed, if it's closed after being answered, then it still doesn't deserve to be closed.

Time to closure is therefore completely irrelevant as a useful statistic. A user who frequently votes to close questions quickly after they are answered is objectively no worse at the task of closing questions properly than those who vote months later.

If you find a user who VTCs questions soon after they're asked, can you use that fact to decide how good they are at judging which questions should be closed? No. The only way you can judge that is by actually looking at which questions they vote to close and which ones they don't.

So this will not actually accomplish anything towards your presumed goal of improving the site.

Now, your real problem is right here:

why when a person is willing to ask and others are happy to answer - almost always within a five minute time frame - does a moderator get to crack down on the question?

Because that's not how the site works. We have minimum standards for questions. And if an asker and answerer happen to disagree about that standard... tough.

We, as the community most experienced with SO, came to an agreement about what that standard will be based on experience with what happens when you don't have that standard. We have a really good idea about what kinds of questions provoke good, useful answers and which kinds of questions are useless filler that helps nobody but the original answerer.

You say:

There's also this argument about ending up with a cesspit like yahoo answers ... what the heck is that ... everytime I google something it takes me to stackoverflow - and the answer and question are usually fantastic - so how is this even a concern?

The reason Google sends you to SO instead of Yahoo Answers is BECAUSE OF OUR STANDARDS. The reason "the answer and question are usually fantastic" is because of our standards. We try our best to reject crap, and in so doing use the time of people who give fantastic answers more efficiently.

My view is that there are moderators who are doing the equivalent of spitting in the sandwich and serving it to the customers.

My view is that "moderators" (AKA: users with close voting powers) are keeping the site afloat. They're the ones keeping the crap questions at bay, maintaining the question quality of the site, and thus making it attractive to people who actually know things.

The "customers" are the people who find good answers. They are not served by crap questions that don't help them.


we now have a lot of people who think SO is great because of STANDARDS, and they are out their cracking down on whoever misses a comma in their code, did not dilute their question thoroughly enough, and so on.

This is hyperbolic nonsense. Nobody votes to close questions over a comma. And I don't know what you're talking about with "diluting" of questions.

But yes, this is what makes SO what it is. Having a bunch of garbage questions that help nobody but the OP is not what we want. The reason why "people that like to share knowledge" are on this site is because they find that there are good questions here that allow them to do so.

Other sites have all of those things you mention. SO was not the first Q&A site. It was not the first site to have voting on posts or even on questions/answers. And yet, SO is the one that is most famous and most well-regarded. Why?

Because we developed standards for the questions we allow. We explicitly do not allow whatever crap a user wants to throw onto the site. We try not to waste the time of experienced users by having them wade through uninteresting garbage.

  • 1
    @John So, your position is, this question was totally fine and should not have been closed, and all the people who voted to close it are just "soup Nazis"? You don't think the requirement that the relevant portions of the code need to be in the question itself "make sense"? Or are you talking about other types of abuse? – Cody Gray Jul 16 '17 at 12:23
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    The "soup nazi" is an overloaded simile. The soup nazi has his business, and the moment you enter, you accept his terms of service. He doesn't take your money (or whatever you gave) if he doesn't give you soup. As long as he's not discriminating social classes, he can do as he please with his private business, and will get clients as long as his soup is as godly as it is and the price is reasonable. Our price is equally reasonable, since at the end of the day, we are providing several times more value than what the asker provides (an answer instead of a question). – Braiam Jul 16 '17 at 13:40
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    @JohnSlegers so, what do you believe are the wrong reasons? Having interesting questions (or at least not dead beat questions) to answer isn't fair? Because as far as I'm aware, the people that provide value are answerers, and if you don't keep them happy they are not going to answer anything at all. It's completely fair that they have that power. They've earned it. Oh, btw, there are at least 10 million answers on the site, do you really believe that those answers aren't the most common? – Braiam Jul 16 '17 at 15:18
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    @JohnSlegers: It has been proven from the early days of SO that "advice" questions degenerate into discussion. SO exists to prevent discussion. "In my experience, post quantity & luck play a far greater role than post quality in getting a decent rep here at StackOverflow!" Your experience does not seem to correlate with the facts on this site. Most people with 20+k rep did not get it from a few highly-upvoted answers to "n00b questions". For example, I did a quick test where I computed the rep from answers I've given with 50+ upvotes. It's still less than one fifth of my total rep. – Nicol Bolas Jul 16 '17 at 15:46
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    @JohnSlegers: If most issues you experience as a programmer are things that can be solved by "use this framework/library", then I humbly submit that what you do and what I do are very different things. – Nicol Bolas Jul 16 '17 at 16:02
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    @JohnSlegers: "Nor is subjectivity a bad thing per se." Yes, it is. It's been proven to be a bad thing. Twice. First, in SO's early days when subjectivity ran wild and quality was terrible. Second, in the "Not Programming Related" days, when subjectivity ran wild on Programmers.SE and quality was terrible. What you're talking about is not new to SO. It has been tried, and it has consistently been shown to produce bad questions, bad answers, and general crap. Experience has taught us what questions produce good answers and what questions do not. – Nicol Bolas Jul 16 '17 at 16:04
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    @JohnSlegers appreciate your eloquent and well thought out response. I think if every single user has the ability to review the "calls" made by their peers / moderator via a simple tool that allows them to aggregate calls they consider damaging, then they will at a minimum feel better about SO as a whole, which should lead to less articles like the ones we have linked and less moderator flags going due to comments lists overheating. – Ole Jul 16 '17 at 23:12
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    @Ole: "calls they consider damaging" But they're not damaging, no matter how much they consider them so. As I pointed out, the "damage" of a closure can only be judged by actually looking at the question being closed. Which no aggregator can do. And therefore their ability to aggregate based on some terrible/meaningless criteria and complain about them is unproductive and unhelpful to achieving the site's goals. – Nicol Bolas Jul 16 '17 at 23:17
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    @NicolBolas we have 2 sides with differing opinions. If you have a tool that acts as a mediator then there's a good chance that those 2 sides will feel better about each other. Nobody is perfect. Some refs are better than others and no ref has the ability to be right 100% of the time. If you have one ref that's handing out 2 red cards every 4 games, that's a nice thing to be aware of. Just because we think it does not happen does not mean it's not happening. – Ole Jul 16 '17 at 23:26
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    @Ole: "If you have a tool that acts as a mediator then there's a good chance that those 2 sides will feel better about each other." Nonsense. That will only happen if both sides respect the mediator. And thus far, the mediator you have proposed is respected by pretty much nobody who isn't on your side. I do not recognize that someone who closes questions within 5 minutes of them being posted is doing anything wrong. And the ability to detect such persons will in no way make me feel any different about that. – Nicol Bolas Jul 16 '17 at 23:27
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    @Ole: You seem to be missing my point. I had two of them, yet you seem to have missed both. The most important is that the change you have proposed will in no way fix the problem you claim exists. Arbitrary metrics and automated tools cannot reliably detect when someone is closing questions improperly. – Nicol Bolas Jul 16 '17 at 23:29
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    I know - you are the genius who has everything figured already. – Ole Jul 16 '17 at 23:46
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    See the link I put in the question on the Hawthorne studies. Researchers increased the lighting in the factory - productivity increased. They decreased the lighting - productivity increased. Why? Because the workers felt like someone cared. So it could be a purely symbolic feature, but it shows that SO actually cares to address the growing chorus of people who feel that SO is hostile, and that matters. – Ole Jul 17 '17 at 1:42
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    @Ole: You're seriously tilting at windmills here. The people you castigate for over moderation are the same people who provide good answers. They are the people who have made this site successful. The standards they promote are what has made this site great, and however much you believe that this is new, it isn't. Why do you spend so much time arguing for allowing (more) bad questions, and so little time actually answering good ones? – Nicol Bolas Jul 18 '17 at 0:49
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    @Ole: "What we are arguing for is a mechanism for user recourse when the improvement mechanism is abused." And now we're back to arguing in circles. None of the stats you've proposed detects abuse. "Abuse" of VTC is not closing a question quickly; therefore, seeing who closes questions quickly tells you nothing about whether they are abusing their powers. Therefore, your proposal is pointless at solving the problem you believe exists. – Nicol Bolas Jul 18 '17 at 1:06

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