4

I opened "Suggested Edit" queue and found this at first time:

https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/16685619

There is a suggested edit from 1-rep user to another 1-rep user. But I think the suggested edits provided with "thomson" are making some sentences from original revision (including the title) have either broken structure or meaning (shown with underlined red markers in image below).

Suggested Edit

At first glance after skimming entire post I want to choose "Reject", but I'm confused between "no improvement" & "conflicts with author's intent" options here (I don't find any reason to cause harm at this point). Which best option should I choose for rejecting this edit?

2
  • 2
    That is an audit and click reject->vandalism. then you can see the hidden community user shows his face. give a punch to his face.
    – Sagar V
    Jul 12, 2017 at 7:46
  • If you are asking which is a good reason to reject it, maybe you should select skip.
    – Braiam
    Jul 12, 2017 at 10:09

1 Answer 1

10

Something like this can be rejected as "vandalism", on the basis that it is "deliberately destructive".

In fact, it looks like a review audit—a nonsense edit automatically generated by the Community user, designed to check whether you're paying attention while reviewing.

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  • In spam or vandalism option the reason written as "this edit defaces in order to promote a product/service, or deliberately destructive". I'm sure the editor doesn't intent for promote anything, but how can it deserves "destructive" reason then? Jul 12, 2017 at 7:46
  • 3
    deliberately destructive that is the word for it. @TetsuyaYamamoto
    – Sagar V
    Jul 12, 2017 at 7:47
  • Thanks for the edits, @CodyGray
    – Cerbrus
    Jul 12, 2017 at 9:26
  • 1
    This is an audit. When you go to the question, there is no pending edit request :)
    – xenteros
    Jul 12, 2017 at 10:02
  • 2
    but how can it deserves "destructive" reason then? @TetsuyaYamamoto Because, as you say in your question, the edits destroy the structure and meaning of the sentences being changed. It's like if someone took a library book and replaced every 18th word with "blah".
    – BSMP
    Jul 12, 2017 at 14:56

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