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This question already has an answer here:

I got a stop-look-listen for down-voting this:

Should I use if unlikely for hard crashing errors?

Please help me understand why it is deemed to be 'high quality.' I don't feel it is a "practical, answerable question[] based on actual problems that you face." It seems to me it would have been much more relevant at Codereview than here.

It appears to be primarily opinion based, and has resulted in 4 very different answers. The highest voted doesn't really answer the question, and is instead an essay on handling errors..

marked as duplicate by gnat, Stephen Rauch, Anthon, HaveNoDisplayName, Toto Jul 11 '17 at 17:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • can you link to the failed audit? – Sagar V Jul 11 '17 at 14:15
  • Audit is here: stackoverflow.com/review/first-posts/16678292 – Jon Clements Jul 11 '17 at 14:19
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    There question of whether a question is opinionated gets argued on Meta often enough with enough disagreement that I'd suggest always opening the actual question in a new tab before reviewing it if you think it's opinion based. – BSMP Jul 11 '17 at 15:02
  • @BSMP Surely that's cheating, but thanks, I was coming to the same conclusion myself. – JeffUK Jul 11 '17 at 15:11
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    It's actually not considered cheating. The purpose of audits is to make you slow down and review carefully. If you're opening a question in a new tab to take a closer look then that's considered a win for the system. – BSMP Jul 11 '17 at 15:14
  • While true, @BSMP, having looked over the question and the first answer, not knowing what if unlikely(...) does means that it's really hard to evaluate if the answer is actually answering the question (especially when the actual, technical question is buried and is lacking a ?). If I'd seen it as a review I'd have opened the new tab, read things over and still been at a loss as to whether or not this was a good question. – Draco18s Jul 11 '17 at 16:34
  • @Draco18s - Nothing wrong with skipping. – BSMP Jul 11 '17 at 16:49
  • @BSMP Oh sure, there definitely isn't. If I'd had to review it, I probably would have been too confused and skipped, but if I'd come to the conclusion that the question was bad in some way (which...it is, it needed an edit which Servy applied) I'd have gotten a failed audit and been even more confused. – Draco18s Jul 11 '17 at 16:53
  • @Draco18s I was only offering advice on how to avoid this in the future, not arguing whether or not this audit in particular was a good one. – BSMP Jul 11 '17 at 17:01
  • Ultimately I was just looking for reassurance that I wasn't being a complete idiot. It looks like, on this one occasion at least, I wasn't. – JeffUK Jul 11 '17 at 17:03
  • @BSMP ...and I agreed. – Draco18s Jul 11 '17 at 17:03
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So a big part of the problem here is that the question is asking a whole bunch of different questions. (4, specifically). Of those, two are asking for opinions, and two are not. It's worth noting that in the comments and answers, everyone has basically just ignored the two questions asking for opinions, and pretty much just pretended that the question was asking the two objective questions that it asked (which is really just the same question phrased twice, making it really just one question).

To be more specific, the first question is:

Should I prefer handling errors with if unlikely?

Which is indeed just straight up asking for people's opinions.

The second question however is:

Will the compiler automatically deduce which part of the code should be cached

Which is an objective question with a verifiably correct answer. It's also the answer that the answers focused on, discussing the effect that the change in question has on the compiled code (and whether or not there is one).

Answers did go on, after answering that question, to go over other changes, besides just the one mentioned in the question, that would also have the same effect, in order to demonstrate different ways that someone can accomplish the same effect the question is indicating is desirable. This is appropriate. Adding additional relevant, but tangential, information to an answer after answering the question asked is appropriate.

The existence of the second, objective, question also adds context to the first question. Looking at the first question in a vacuum, it's simply asking for opinions, but given that the question goes on to discuss whether or not the stated change affects the ability of the CPU to properly cache information, it has added context to the question indicating that the OP wants to ensure that the code is cached properly, and wants to know which solutions accomplish that goal based on their preferences, rather than asking other people whether they would prefer to cache it or not.

So, given all of this, we've ended up in a position where a question technically asks an opinion based question, but everyone is ignoring that entirely and just answering the objective question that it also asked, so the solution here isn't to close the question as opinion based, but rather to simply edit out the question asking for opinions, and to leave the objective question that everyone was treating as the only question all along. I've since applied this edit.

  • I agree that in context of the answers provided, it's potentially a valuable question/answer exchange. So I just got unlucky that I saw it in the review queue out of context? Fair enough. – JeffUK Jul 11 '17 at 15:01
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    @JeffUK You weren't lacking context from the review queue. If you look at isolated sentences of the question, without the context of the rest of the question, then they look (and are) asking for opinions, but when you look at the question as a whole, not so much. Seeing the answers helps, and it's certainly a case where one would benefit from taking the time to go look at them, but I'm not sure that it's necessary to look at them. You did get unlucky in the sense that this is a really hard question to evaluate; the conclusion that I came to here is certainly not obvious. – Servy Jul 11 '17 at 15:04
  • I think if they'd explicitly stated that their objective was to increase caching/performance, it would have been simple. Not knowing what if unlikely is supposed to do, the fact they go on to mention caching didn't really give me any clues. Thanks again. – JeffUK Jul 11 '17 at 15:14

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