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I was reviewing first posts when I came along this post: Replace the string of special characters in c# I wanted to go ahead and comment giving suggestions to use StringBuilder instead of string. As soon as I tried to comment I got an alert saying this was an audit and I failed. How is giving a helpful comment to a good question failing an audit? I find it absurd and counter-intuitive to only comment on low-quality posts and refrain from any helpful comments if it is a high-quality post.

marked as duplicate by gnat, honk, BDL, Cody Gray discussion Jul 7 '17 at 10:00

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    Your comment would have been superfluous, as that comment already exists. – Cody Gray Jul 7 '17 at 10:02
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    But you don't see comments, upvotes or the correct username at times in audit questions. So surely I wasn't aware of similar comments. The question here is not about superfluous comments, but why would any comment result in a failed audit. – FortyTwo Jul 7 '17 at 10:45
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    Well a StringBuilder isn't actually an appropriate tool for that job in the first place, so there's that. – Servy Jul 7 '17 at 17:54
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    @Servy I will repeat. It is not about whether my comment is the accurate solution. It is about being Audits failing if you comment. So there isn't that – FortyTwo Jul 7 '17 at 18:13
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    @Servy Stringbuilder does help in better performance String.Replace() vs. StringBuilder.Replace() – FortyTwo Jul 7 '17 at 18:17
  • @FortyTwo And yet it's still notably worse than numerous other options presented as answers. Being a better solution than something else that's a bad solution doesn't make it a good solution. – Servy Jul 7 '17 at 18:30
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    @Servy I was proposing a comment and not an answer. Irrespective of the quality of the comment why would my audit fail? That is my issue. – FortyTwo Jul 7 '17 at 18:32
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    I can explain to you why this action failed the audit, and that's because there was nothing wrong with the question and so you shouldn't have wanted to add a moderation comment to it. Of course, you'll argue that you weren't adding a moderation comment, but that misses the point. The purpose of the review queues is to moderate posts, so the interface is designed around that, and if you try to add a comment to something that doesn't need to be moderated (taken as fact, because it's an audit), then the system fails you. You can disagree with that design, and many do, but it is what it is. – Cody Gray Jul 8 '17 at 1:11