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I am new to Java. And one thing which frustrates me very much on this site is the obsession of users with the perfection of questions and answers, instead of really trying to help the OP/questioner. The restriction placed on asking questions only make matters worse.

Sometimes when I was looking for a specific info. regarding some misc. non-java subject, I encountered Reddit, and then got frustrated because in the long stream of discussion, it was difficult for me to find the best and appropriate answer. I then realised, at least partly, the probable motivations of the site managers, to focus so much on the answerability of the questions, and the quality of questions themselves.

As a novice to Java, many times, I ask questions in which I am not technically 100% correct in framing the statement or even a totally incorrect/invalid question. An ideal thing for me, in that case, is to get people making an approximation on what I am really trying to ask, and then answer it, with an attached note regarding those approximations. Or, a solution oriented criticism, with the intention of helping the OP, instead of just plain criticism done for the sake of criticising.

I really don't care about the reputation changes. I don't care about voting. But I do think that restricting users from asking questions is a plain simple discrimination against freshers/rookies.

I propose/suggest the site administrators to restrict the visibility of downvoted questions(preferably only on search engines such as Google), instead of restricting the users from asking questions. I have no problem, if my question after a few initial days of activity, is deleted or not shown on site. As a novice, my sole primary purpose is to gain knowledge and clarity on concepts.

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    Just behave within the quality policies of the Stack Oveflow site, and everything goes just smooth and fine. We don't need or even want such feature. Jun 27, 2017 at 10:53
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    Look at how many questions are posted each day. Without any quality control (e.g. indicating on-topic, good questions by upvoting and others by downvoting/closing) the site would drown in questions which would be ignored without any indication of what is wrong with them. This would also mean no indication to the OP that they should work on their question to make it better. Jun 27, 2017 at 10:59
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    Note: downvotes for feature requests on Meta usually mean disagreement with the proposed feature. Jun 27, 2017 at 11:08
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    @πάνταῥεῖ well for the sake of precision features of restricting visibility are there already. Questions having score -4 or less aren't displayed at front page and triaged questions aren't shown to anyone besides reviewers (as Shog said back then, "take that, wall of cr@p")
    – gnat
    Jun 27, 2017 at 12:03
  • @gnat Ah, good to know. Jun 27, 2017 at 12:07
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    'An ideal thing for me, in that case, is to get people making an approximation on what I am really trying to ask, and then answer it, with an attached note regarding those approximations. Or, a solution oriented criticism, with the intention of helping the OP' - OK, sure, but how am I gonna get paid for all that time? If PayPal is unacceptable, then you can have a down/close vote for free and work out for yourself why your question is bad:) Jun 27, 2017 at 13:01
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    instead of just plain criticism done for the sake of criticising You're more likely to have a constructive conversation when you don't start off with the false assumption that everyone else is behaving maliciously and/or doing something you don't like for no real reason.
    – BSMP
    Jun 27, 2017 at 15:16

4 Answers 4

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I propose/suggest the site administrators to restrict the visibility of downvoted questions(preferably only on search engines such as Google), instead of restricting the users from asking questions

The idea of limiting the visibility of questions that don't fulfill the community's quality standards isn't entirely without merit.

It's been discussed before, though, and the general opinion here on Meta is that it would create a "ghetto" of very basic questions that ultimately no one with the expertise necessary to answer questions well will want to enter. At 12,000+ new questions every day already (and that's with the quality controls in place!), it is unlikely you will find a lot of people ready to wade through those questions and help the askers of easily googleable, unintelligible, or completely basic questions for free.

It would end up being new users looking for rep points trying to help out other new users, without the community scrutiny (votes, comments, answers) that helps keep the quality of Stack Overflow's content high.

restricting users from asking questions is a plain simple discrimination against freshers/rookies.

True - but that's not an inherently bad thing! Most institutions discriminate based on the applicants' level of knowledge and skill.

It's very obvious e.g. with Universities. You won't be able to enter that rocket science course without a solid footing in physics, chemistry, and math.

We're certainly not as strict as a University, but some minimum expertise is indeed expected when posting on Stack Overflow.

When learning programming, don't rely on Stack Overflow too much. It's not always the empowering, nurturing, mentoring-oriented resource you may need at that early stage.

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    Thanks for the very positive and clarity dispersing answer. I really appreciate and I got your point.
    – amsquareb
    Jun 27, 2017 at 18:36
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Stack Overflow is not a help desk. What you propose, namely:

...restrict the visibility of downvoted questions(preferably only on search engines such as Google), instead of restricting the users from asking questions. I have no problem, if my question after a few initial days of activity, is deleted or not shown on site. As a novice, my sole primary purpose is to gain knowledge and clarity on concepts.

would be a fundamental violation of the mission of Stack Overflow. You are looking at this very selfishly, thinking that we're all here just to help you. That is one thing we certainly do, but it is not our primary goal. Our primary goal is to build an encyclopedic repository of answers to the long-tail of programming questions. If your question were to be deleted or not shown after a few days, then it wouldn't be helping anyone but you, which means that the effort everyone put into answering it would be significantly decreased, since fewer people could benefit.

In fact, we specifically prevent people from asking questions, getting answers, and then deleting their questions for precisely this reason: it is abusive of our limited (volunteer-only) resources.

Furthermore, even if you are selfish enough to continue insisting that we do this, there is a practical problem: whom are you going to get to answer your question if your question is not visible to the people who might answer it? And if the question is visible to them for answering purposes, it would also be visible to them for voting and other moderation purposes. Ooops.

I do think that restricting users from asking questions is a plain simple discrimination against freshers/rookies.

But it isn't. We don't care if you're a rookie. ("Fresher" is an adjective that refers to how you smell, not your skill level.)

All we care about is the quality of the question itself—whether it's clear, interesting, and useful to others. There are plenty of rookie-level questions that meet these criteria, but there are plenty more that don't. If you're contributing positively to the knowledge base of the site by asking beginner-level questions, then you will be fine. If you are asking questions that you should have Googled the answer to first, then you will have a bad time.

See also: Is SO a welcoming place for beginners? and all of the related duplicates

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    I am afraid you are wrong. "Fresher" is a real slang word for someone who is fresh, e.g. see this. Jun 27, 2017 at 14:56
  • Hmm. Seems it is British slang. I'm quite unfamiliar with it. It is not used on this side of the pond.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 27, 2017 at 15:00
  • I actually used to see that word a lot in recruiting emails. It's weird because the positions were never for something overseas.
    – BSMP
    Jun 27, 2017 at 15:20
  • I never mentioned regarding blocking the downvoting a question. If you block the downvoting, how would you decide regarding the restriction on visibility - the one thing I am proposing. I am proposing a restriction on visibility after initial few days of activity, so that it can be answered. Regarding selfishness - I didn't proposed this out of selfishness, but my plain and simple ignorance regarding the motivations of people here. Thanks for clearing this out to me. I thought that this was a community, and people here just help each other out.
    – amsquareb
    Jun 27, 2017 at 18:32
  • @amsquareb but we are. Just not in the way you are thinking of. We help each other by ensuring our quality standards are high enough that each question is valuable to the next user. In this world of limited time, you can 'hit'a lot more people this way. This ensures that the time I spend answering questions has as much impact as possible.
    – Patrice
    Jun 27, 2017 at 18:34
  • @Patrice Thanks for the added clarity.
    – amsquareb
    Jun 27, 2017 at 18:44
  • "I am proposing a restriction on visibility after initial few days of activity, so that it can be answered." I just don't understand how you think this would work. If a question has restricted visibility, the people who are able to answer it won't see it, so they won't be able to answer it.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 28, 2017 at 10:04
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An ideal thing for me, in that case, is to get people making an approximation on what I am really trying to ask, and then answer it, with an attached note regarding those approximations

People aren't mind readers. Imagine the time and effort that would be wasted in coming up with an answer based on an approximation, and only discovering afterwards that it had nothing to do with what the OP wanted.

I think for the most part, if you can't fully describe the problem you're facing and need to justify it with approximations, then you need to review your own work until you understand it better. People can't really help you if you don't know what you need.

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    Indeed. It simply isn't reasonable to ask other users to risk down votes on their answers by guessing on an unclear question.
    – BSMP
    Jun 27, 2017 at 15:18
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You're looking for a mentor or a tutor.

You know, the problem is that of the worldwide population of people who learn to program every year, which is tens if not hundreds of thousands of people, a lot of them are going to have the same questions, being "How do I get past this syntax error?", "How do I debug my running but malfunctioning program?" and most importantly "How am I going to explain to another person what I'm trying to do and why it doesn't work".

While the first question might be ontopic, I can guarantee you that each and every syntax error of every non-esoteric language has already been asked and answered on Stack Overflow.

Then you're left with questions that, for answering, will require a relative expert to hand-hold you to teach to how to analyze that which you are lacking, and in the meantime, solve the problem you're having.

There just aren't enough knowledgeable people with enough free time on their hands to do that.

And that is apart from what the other answerers are saying here, namely that giving such advise would be so specific to the asker that it won't be useful for anybody else.

So again: you need someone who can teach you to research your own problems and phrase your problems such that you can ask them to a web search engine first, and get an answer before even having to post a question on Stack Overflow.

You could give it a go at Reddit's /r/learnprogramming for example, though I have no experience with posting there, so it might not be what you expect of it.

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    "I can guarantee you that each and every syntax error of every non-esoteric language has already been asked and answered on Stack Overflow." Ah, spoken like someone who is not a C++ programmer. :-)
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 27, 2017 at 14:23
  • @Cody don't get me started on templates! (But no, really, not much C++ experience).
    – CodeCaster
    Jun 27, 2017 at 14:32
  • Well..my problem isn't the Syntax error at this stage as much as, it seems to me, the obsession of people here with code snippets. As a beginner with a INTP kind of mind, 'understanding' often precedes 'practice', for me. And people here, it seems, don't appreciate a question unless it contains a code snippet - the theoretical and conceptual questions, which don't necessarily require a code snippet. I could be wrong though, just I was in my proposal above :) Bdw, sorry for the late comment, I just stumbled upon my meta account.
    – amsquareb
    Jan 1, 2020 at 9:56

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