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In this edit, I updated an URL that no longer points to the intended destination. I thought my edit was uncontroversial because (1) the unedited link results in a not found response, and (2) the in-line change indicates that the edited link should point to the same document. However, the edit was rejected by two reviewers stating "This edit was intended to address the author of the post and makes no sense as an edit. It should have been written as a comment or an answer."

Do I misunderstand the editing rules, was my comment not clear enough, or was the rejection simply a mistake?

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    Spammers also tend to suggest edits to only change an url. So if that is the only change you have there is a chance your edit gets rejected. Leaving a comment like this update URL is not helpful in that respect. Had you extended that comment with why the url needed updating it might have caught the eye of the reviewers and changing their review action, – rene Jun 24 '17 at 10:42
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    Or might not do a thing. Reviewers are known for being an army of smashing buttons flying monkeys. – Braiam Jun 24 '17 at 10:46
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    @rene if that was the case "This edit was intended to address the author of the post and makes no sense as an edit. It should have been written as a comment or an answer" is wayy too weird to be used in case of you introducing spam... and the domain wasn't even changed. – Braiam Jun 24 '17 at 10:47
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    Don't use update url. Use fixed broken link. Anyway, I edited it now to fix the url – Sagar V Jun 24 '17 at 10:55
  • @Braiam we know our reviewers, right? – rene Jun 24 '17 at 11:07
  • Related: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/334964/… – psubsee2003 Jun 24 '17 at 11:09
  • @rene sadly, yes. – Braiam Jun 24 '17 at 11:10
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    Guys, and let get this out of the way: there's nothing, nothing at all that assures you that reviewers even read the fine comment. Reviewers act almost based on the amount of red/green since before '13. – Braiam Jun 24 '17 at 11:14
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    @Braiam while I wouldn't be shocked if true, i dont think one instance is enough evidence to say your premise is 100% correct – psubsee2003 Jun 24 '17 at 22:47
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    I understand that fixed broken link would have been a better comment than update URL. Nonetheless, my point is that even without reading the comment, looking at the Markdown diff shows that the edit is uncontroversial. I can expect that much effort from someone reviewing my edit, can't I? In my opinion, blindly rejecting an edit like that is misuse of review rights and should be frowned upon by the community. – akku Jun 24 '17 at 22:48
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    @psubsee2003 it isn't one instance, look for "reject/accepted edits" on meta. – Braiam Jun 24 '17 at 22:48
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    [feature-request]: if meta question title contains "edit" and "rejected", show a popup saying "Are you sure you used an informative edit comment to help reviewers realize you're doing something right?" – Andras Deak Jun 26 '17 at 19:27
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    @AndrasDeak An edit is defined by its code diff, not by its comment. Thus, reviewers should mainly base their decision on the diff. In particular, a simple diff (as in this case) should not require a sophisticated comment to be reviewed correctly. Whether a comment is informative or not is highly subjective, even though I agree that my comment could have been more precise. – akku Jun 27 '17 at 5:20
  • Both the reviewers were wrong in rejecting your edit. The specified reasons are also laughable. AFAIK, you can minimize such reviewer mistakes by making your intention clear in the comments, as pointed out by others. – Ajoy Jun 27 '17 at 6:49
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    My point was that virtually every unmerited edit rejection boils down to "the reviewers are sloppy/overly defensive/robo but the edit message wasn't clear either". Ideally edit messages are irrelevant; in practice they're step 0 if you want your edit to pass. – Andras Deak Jun 27 '17 at 9:22
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Nonetheless, my point is that even without reading the comment, looking at the Markdown diff shows that the edit is uncontroversial.

I agree and I'm pretty sure everyone who's commented agrees with that too. I don't think anyone here is arguing that a good reviewer who'd paid attention wouldn't or shouldn't have approved your edit. rene and Sagar V were just suggesting ways you can increase your chances of having your edits accepted. Making it clear you're fixing something, not just changing it, might slow down an otherwise good reviewer who isn't paying as much attention as they should.

But Braiam is also correct that some reviewers will run through the queue accepting or rejecting all edits they come across. Audits are designed to catch the users who accept everything but, as far as I know, it's not currently set up to be able to catch users who reject edits they should approve.

Known-bad audits in Suggested Edits are instead generated from scratch by simply injecting random changes into an existing post. Obviously this algorithm cannot be reversed to generate reliable improvements; if it could, we wouldn't need human editors anymore! - Nathan Tuggy

(The meta question is gone now but there's a PhD student working on something like this for Stack Overflow.)

It's interesting that of the three users who reviewed your edit, one user rejects most edits they review and one user has never rejected an edit.

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    There are currently no edits being used for audits at all. Known-bad audits in Suggested Edits are instead generated from scratch by simply injecting random changes into an existing post. Obviously this algorithm cannot be reversed to generate reliable improvements; if it could, we wouldn't need human editors anymore! – Nathan Tuggy Jun 25 '17 at 6:22
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    So the current edit-review audit system detects reviewers that wrongly accept edits by letting them evaluate known-bad edits? Couldn't this functionality be extended to detect reviewers that wrongly reject edits by letting them evaluate known-good edits? Known-good edits could be, e.g., edits made by highly reputable users and/or a set of community-defined edit cases that are known to frequently cause false rejects. – akku Jun 25 '17 at 10:51

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