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I recently deleted an example from the documentation - It was in a form of an article, WITHOUT any attribution, well written, almost too good to be an original documentation example that was never edited and improved by others (I know that it's possible, I just don't see a lot of those in the Documentation at the moment, sorry).

I Googled a random part from that example and found that it was a copy & paste from some commercial company blog, which has a © (Copyright sign) on the footer on their website. I deleted the example and submitted it to review, with a link to the original content, and it was approved.

Today the user who originally posted that example submit a revert to undelte the example - Apparently they wrote the original post (The name of the User on SO match to the name of the author of the original article), so this is not a simple case of plagiarism, it's something different that I need to know how to handle in future.

What (if anything) should be done with similar examples where:

  • The content was originally written by the user, but for another website
  • I don't know whether the content is copyright to the user or the website owner (Which is the company the user is working for on this specific case)
  • I'm not even sure if we really want duplicate content in the documentation (I know that it's a bad practice in SEO - Reference)
  • There is no reference to the original article in the example (That's why I submitted it for deletion in the first place)

That the example is live again and exist in the documentation. I didn't review the last submission to undelete it because I wanted to see the reviewers decision about it.

I will be happy to know your opinion and what you think is the correct approach to handle similar cases in future.

closed as off-topic by Robert Columbia, Jan Doggen, peterh, Michael Gaskill, il_raffa Aug 25 '18 at 15:44

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The content was originally written by the user, but for another website

So long as the author didn't give up ownership to some other entity and still retain it, that's not a problem at all.

I don't know whether the content is copyright to the user or the website owner (Which is the company the user is working for on this specific case)

The user is asserting that they still own it, and it seems to really be them, so this is more of a case of "you should only remove it if you know that they did give it up" rather than removing out of fear that they may have given up ownership rights to someone else when they assert that they haven't, and where you have no reason to doubt them.

I'm not even sure if we really want duplicate content in the documentation

Duplicating something like the official language documentation is almost certainly not helpful; having some content that's on some person's blog is a bit different, and may actually be helpful.

There is no reference to the original article in the example

Nor does there need to be. The person submitting it here is the original author, and thus has the authority to post the content without reference. If the original article provided some form of licence that allowed copying of the content with citation (like, say, what SE does for its user generated content) then if someone other than the author copied it then attribution would be necessary; that's not the situation we're in here.

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    So basically what you're saying is that it's none of your business and I should not take charge and be responsible to enforce copyright laws for the documentation content. This make a lot of sense and is very clear for me. That is a high quality piece of example - No doubt about that. Thank you – Alon Eitan Jun 20 '17 at 14:40
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    @AlonEitan No, I'm saying that because they're the owner of the content they're not violating copyright by providing it. If they weren't the owner of the content then it would be a problem. – Servy Jun 20 '17 at 14:41
  • Yup, but then it's just a plain plagiarism case, right? I know that there are some cases where you get paid and you give away your ownership of a content, which make it illegal in copyright laws. But this is not court.stackexchange.com and very unlikely the case here. Your answer is good enough to be my guideline in future – Alon Eitan Jun 20 '17 at 14:47
  • Oh, on my first comment I wrote "none of your business", but what I meant was "none of my business" - I'm sorry if I sounded rude (Not a native English speaker) – Alon Eitan Jun 20 '17 at 15:15
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    @AlonEitan I understood what you meant. – Servy Jun 20 '17 at 15:16

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