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A very common advice/belief most newbies are taught:

When you declare a string, its length should be one more than the maximum number of characters it's supposed to hold.

Sounds perfectly reasonable — strings are terminated with an extra NULL character. However, now that I've grown in programming, it seems to me that it is not so right after all.

Let's say I want to create an integer array Arr that can hold x number of elements. The index value of Arr's last element will be one less than x since index values start from 0 and not 1. So, its length is x-1.
Why should string length be plus one its capacity in C?

So this is how it gets declared: int Arr[x-1].

Now if Arr were a char type array (i.e. a string), the length of Arr would be one more than that of its int counterpart since it has an extra NULL character at the end.
Why should string length be plus one its capacity in C?

With a little bit of arithmetic, you can work out the string length to be (x-1)+1=x.

Code to demonstrate this
So why does the declaration this time has to be char Arr[x+1] and not simply char Arr[x]?
Why should string length be plus one its capacity in C?

I did hours of research using Internet and managed to come up with a suitable explanation and code to back up my claim. I posted a question on this because I still had my doubts. (Much of the explanation here has been quoted from that question.) It was very ill-received and initially many of the users were misunderstanding my point.

Maybe my question wasn't clearly worded or my claim is invalid.

Either ways, it doesn't explain why the answers and comments failed to understand/address the purpose of my question which is to ask why a given statement is valid.

This leads to the ultimate question:

Are questions questioning the validity of a widespread advice unwelcome on SO?

  • In addition to the other answers explaining the logical fallacy; this question really could be debugged by yourself. Create an array: int Arr[x-1]. Try to store x integers in it. The resulting out of bounds error/exception would have been enough to answer your question. – Rob Jun 19 '17 at 0:11
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Either ways, it doesn't explain why the answers and comments failed to understand/address the purpose of my question which is to ask why a given statement is valid.

That's because your statement is based on fallacious reasoning and bad math. For example:

Let's say I want to create an integer array Arr that can hold x number of elements. The index value of Arr's last element will be one less than x since index values start from 0 and not 1. So, its length is x-1.

Wrong. The length of an array is the number of elements in the array. Which you just said was x. That's what "array length" means in C. The length of an array is not the index of the last element.

Everything else your question asks from that point forward is based on this error. When that error is removed from the question, your contradiction goes away and the eventual question effectively evaporates.

You cannot expect productive comments and answers from a question that starts with bad assumptions. Garbage in, garbage out.

Are questions questioning the validity of a widespread advice unwelcome on SO?

No. But if they don't make sense or they're based on bad logic and/or math, don't be surprised to see people questioning it.

  • Thanks for the response. If the maximum index of an element is not array length, what is? (Not sarcasm) How would you define array length in C? – Soha Farhin Pine Jun 18 '17 at 3:05
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    @SohaFarhinPine: Length is max index+1 in all 0-based indexing. – Nathan Tuggy Jun 18 '17 at 3:15
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    @SohaFarhinPine: "If the maximum index of an element is not array length, what is?" It's probably exactly what I said: "The length of an array is the number of elements in the array." I simply cannot be clearer than that. – Nicol Bolas Jun 18 '17 at 3:34
  • @NicolBolas Didn't notice that line. Sorry. By the way, you say my statement is based on "fallacious reasoning and bad math". Fallacious reasoning, yes. But bad math? If my hypothesis is founded upon an erroneous reasoning, any conclusion that results from it will be wrong matter-of-factly. My workings could be correct, yet it's based on an invalid statement so ultimately it would be rendered invalid as well. That doesn't make the math I did to prove my final statement "bad" - in fact, they are perfectly correct. I would suggest editing the phrase out. – Soha Farhin Pine Jun 18 '17 at 4:16
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    I think I'd say that "The index value of Arr's last element will be one less than x since index values start from 0 and not 1. So, its length is x-1" counts as bad maths, to be honest... "How many values occur between inclusive bounds of 0 and x-1?" is a maths question. I don't think there's anything wrong with questioning conventional wisdom, but it's worth approaching the question with the assumption that it's probably a mistake in your logic, not the conventional wisdom. – Jon Skeet Jun 18 '17 at 8:05
  • @JonSkeet I didn't say array length is the number of elements in an array. Rather, I'd tried to show the last serial number in terms of x. – Soha Farhin Pine Jun 18 '17 at 10:30
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    @SohaFarhinPine: Yes, but then you said "its length is x-1". If you didn't understand that the length of an array is the number of elements in it, that's somewhat understandable - but this at least looks like a maths failure. I think what should be important is what you can learn from this, to be honest. – Jon Skeet Jun 18 '17 at 11:14
  • @JonSkeet Yes, I'd thought the maximum index of an element is the array length. Of course, I've learned valuable lessons from this experience which I don't think I'll ever forget. – Soha Farhin Pine Jun 18 '17 at 18:14
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Are questions questioning the validity of a widespread advice unwelcome on SO?

I think it depends on how it's questioned. I suspect your question would have been much better received if it had been in the spirit of "I don't understand why this is" rather than "However, as I grew in programming, now it seems that it's not so correct."

This isn't just important for questioning advice - it's important when developing too. If you always assume that it's your understanding that's wrong rather than that (say) the compiler, specification or library has a bug, you'll fix things much quicker.

This isn't to say that longstanding advice is always right, or that compilers don't have bugs etc - it's just that it doesn't happen nearly as often as we have misunderstandings or bugs in our code.

I do want to be encouraging though: it's absolutely appropriate to question things too, and never go along with something just because someone says so. Understanding the reasoning for a rule (or whatever it is) is far more important than just obeying it. But it's a matter of how you approach that questioning.

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