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I learnt recently of the trend on Stack Overflow to burninate tags with company names (like , , , ...) in favor of product-specific tags (like , , , ...).

This made me wonder what we should do for companies where no product exists that has the name of the company, but where the company name is often used as an - unofficial - reference to one or more products of the same company.

A good example would be . As I explained in my answer to the question What are ABAP and SAP?:

[...]

Although SAP ERP isn't the only software sold by SAP, people are typically referring to SAP ERP when they say "they're using SAP at work". It's important to note, though, that SAP is the name of the company and no software is sold or licensed as just "SAP".

[...]

It would make sense to burninate the tag in analogy with the & tags and replace it with product specific tags like , , , , etc. However, this may confuse eg. ABAP programmers and leave them puzzled on which tags to use in one of two situations:

  • Their question involves , but they don't think about using that tag as they're used to just calling the product (like almost everyone does)
  • They have a general SAP-related programming question that doesn't refer to any specific SAP product

This makes me wonder... Should the tag be burninated, or does at least one of these two situations warrant a valid use for the tag?


Notes

The second situation doesn't apply only to companies where no product exists that has the name of a company. As I - just - commented here:

Personally, I don't how burninating eg. the & tags would help people with general programming problems that apply to multiple products of that company. When considering situations where a programming question may apply to eg. all apple operating systems or all Samsung mobile devices, allowing only more specific tags would result in less exposure of the question and therefore a reduced likelihood of getting your question answered. How is that progress?!

Generally speaking, I believe the perfect tagging strategy involves multiple levels of specificity (or to paraphrase Shrek : "it's like an onion"). Here's two examples:

  • Consider a question on HTTP Routing in PHP's Laravel library. In this case, I would use the tags (general), (narrowed down), (narrowed down further) & + (issue specific).
  • Consider a question on BAPI programming, in SAP ERP. In this case, I would use the tags (general), (narrowed down), (narrowed down further) & + (issue specific).

It is only the COMBINATION of such tags of various specificity that keeps both the quality & quantity of people checking out your question high, which seriously increases the chance of getting a good answer. In each of these cases, dropping any of those tags would reduce the effectiveness of the other tags.

Tags with company names can and typically do serve the same purpose as tags with programming languages: they give a high level specification of the environment the question applies to. This is why I personally see this trend to burninate tags with company names as a step backwards rather than a move forward, for reasons mentioned hereabove... But I guess that's just my five cents.

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    Let's drain the cup of [sap]. – Adriaan Jun 15 '17 at 10:45
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    Burninate this a[sap] – Bhargav Rao Jun 15 '17 at 10:45
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    Should we [sap] the life out of this tag? – Bugs Jun 15 '17 at 11:05
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    slightly related: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/346273/… – rene Jun 15 '17 at 11:28
  • @rene : Considering both questions address the general approach of burninating company based tags and the burnination of the sap tag specificly, I'd argue they're actually closely related. I wouldn't qualify either as a duplicate of the other, though. So I made a few edits to my question and posted my edited version as an answer here! – John Slegers Jun 15 '17 at 11:40
  • Yeah, well, based on your title I would say this question is actionable while the other is more a generic, so that made me go for slightly but if you say closely I'm not going to oppose to that. ;) – rene Jun 15 '17 at 12:33
  • @rene : There's a difference not between topics covered (both cover the same two topics), but between the focus of both questions (one focuses on the burnination of the sap & the other focuses on the general concept of burnination of general tags). That's why I'm arguing they are closely related but not duplicates of one another. – John Slegers Jun 15 '17 at 12:59
  • Burninate implies destruction without reason. Why not just deprecate them by leaving them as synonyms and not having them applied to new questions? – lit Jun 15 '17 at 15:49
  • @lit: Because that's not something the SO software supports at present (especially the concepts of synonymizing to multiple targets or synonymizing without changing all previous questions). Burnination, on MSO, does not mean "blind, unthinking destruction", although it does carry connotations of rather hasty, aggressive, prolonged purging. Check the tag info, and in future always avoid the etymological fallacy when possible. – Nathan Tuggy Jun 16 '17 at 2:54
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    Whas[sap] with this tag? – Jean-François Corbett Jun 16 '17 at 10:32
  • Maybe we can turn it into syrup instead. – jpmc26 Jun 16 '17 at 22:47
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The number-one question I ask when looking at these requests is:

Does it describe the contents of the questions to which it is applied? and is it unambiguous?

If everyone (within some small margin of error) refers to SAP ERP as "SAP", then the tag is both descriptive and unambiguous. If some non-trivial number of folks use to refer to some other SAP product, then that's a problem.

Now... If an overwhelming majority of people use the tag for the same purpose but a non-trivial number use it for something else... The correct solution may be to simply synonymize with - this would cause the former to be immediately replaced with the latter whenever someone used it on a question, and thus give them immediate feedback as to what the tag is considered to mean here. Again though, I would only consider this if it was regularly applied to something other than ERP questions.

Completely removing the tag from the system when nearly everyone using it agrees on what it means... Is counter-productive, and likely to increase the number of poorly-tagged questions.

  • Why force tags to be as specific? Or to put it differently : what's wrong with general tags? The more general the tag, the greater the visibility of your question and therefore the more likely it is you'll be getting an answer for it! IMO the best way to get a good answer is to combine both general & specific tags. – John Slegers Jun 15 '17 at 17:15
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    @JohnSlegers in medicine there's two terms called sensitivity and specificity which apply here: you want to show the question to a many people as possible, but only to those that are actually interested in them. If you make a tag too general it will cause two things: questions they would like to answer will be drown in the noise of everything else, but if you make it too specific you are missing relevant audience. You want a tag that it's well defined and with the assurance that someone could be an expert in it. – Braiam Jun 16 '17 at 0:26
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    @Braiam : IMO the perfect tagging strategy involves multiple levels of specificity (or to paraphrase Shrek : "it's like an onion"). For example, consider a question on HTTP Routing in PHP's Laravel library. I would use the tags php (general), symfony (narrowed down), laravel (narrowed down further) & routing + http (issue specific). It is only the COMBINATION of such tags of various specificity that keeps both the quality & quantity of people checking out your question high, which seriously increases the chance of getting a good answer! – John Slegers Jun 16 '17 at 8:15
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    You're confusing breadth of meaning with ambiguity (multiple meanings), @John. PHP is extremely broad, but folks do not, as a rule, use php to refer to things other than the language/platform. Contrast with, for example, cd which could refer to either the "change directory" command or a "compact disc" - neither meaning is particularly broad in and of itself, but if the tag is used for both then it becomes ambiguous. – Shog9 Jun 16 '17 at 16:16
  • @Shog9 : So, then what's wrong with apple or microsoft? Those are pretty unambiguous and can be used to target a specific range of platforms the same way php is used! – John Slegers Jun 16 '17 at 16:20
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    There is precious little in common between iOS dev in Swift and OSX dev in ObjC. There's nothing in common between VBA in Excel and C# on ASP.NET. "Microsoft" isn't a platform; it's a company that manufactures platforms - and has 4 decades worth of platforms to its name. Putting php on your web-dev question clarifies that question; putting microsoft on your web-dev question does not. – Shog9 Jun 16 '17 at 16:25
  • Some people specialize in Microsoft technology or Apple technology, just like other people specialize in all things SAP and other specialize in all things web development. General tags have their use for experts that have a broad area of expertise! In my own case, my expertise varies from frontend (HTML+JS+CSS) & backend (PHP/MySQL+ a bit of NodeJS) web development to SAP development (mostly ABAP)... and I just started getting into home automation. Because of my broad interest & expertise, when I'm looking for questions to answer, I rarely click on any tag that isn't very general / generic! – John Slegers Jun 16 '17 at 17:27
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If that sap is regularly used as the company name, not only for meaning sap-erp while most people understand it as a synonym to sap-erp, it should be burninated because it is then even counter-productive as a tag.

Imagine someone tagging a Sybase database question with sap because that does belongs to SAP. That will deter quite a bunch of people to even look at the question, because they may think it is about sap-erp too and may not have knowledge in it. Same for Business Objects BI solutions, Crystal Reports, ...

Now if for everyone that is just the company name, no more a synonym for sap-erp, then using this sap tag would be just noise in my opinion. Is there many people interested in following all the questions related to the company products, although they are so diverse?

Only if it is most of the time used as meaning sap-erp should it be kept, as already said by Shog9.

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    sap can be used as a reference to erp or as a reference to other sap products. And yes, there are people interested in following all the questions related to a certain company's products just like there are people interested in following all the questions related to a certain programming language. In fact, I rarely click on a tag that isn't a pretty general one if I'm in the mood for answering questions. – John Slegers Jun 16 '17 at 17:18
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    A company can buy any other company, even having utterly unrelated businesses and products. A language will not do that, that is not really comparable. Sybase databases have a lot more in common with Microsoft Sql-Server than with any other SAP product. Of course you can always find some people interested in following a company. But very likely way less than people interested in following a language or technology, especially when the company is far from being single focused. – Frédéric Jun 16 '17 at 17:27
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    Sometimes, all products of a company are related. Sometimes they aren't. I don't believe in a "one size fits all approach" for categorizing tech. – John Slegers Jun 16 '17 at 17:31

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