2

Just 10 minutes ago, I'd completed drafting a new topic under python. I submitted it for review.

After that, I accidentally clicked the edit button. Trying to leave edit mode, I clicked on delete this draft. A few moments later, I realised the magnitude of my actions.

Can my draft be undeleted somehow?

If not, can we put in a request for deleted drafts to be temporarily visible for a while, similar to deleted answers and questions?

Also, there should be a prompt before deletion, because it is possible for users to misunderstand what happens when they click the button.

Q: Can a mod/site dev help me? Or is this a lost cause?


Update

So, it seems like the draft is gone for good. If you run into the same situation, don't make any new drafts until you talk to a site moderator. They might be able to recover your most recent draft, if it was deleted.

closed as off-topic by pnuts, divibisan, Stephen Rauch, il_raffa, Michael Gaskill Aug 28 '18 at 3:40

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "The problem described here can no longer be reproduced. Changes to the system or to the circumstances affecting the asker have rendered it obsolete. If you encounter a similar problem, please post a new question." – pnuts, divibisan, Stephen Rauch, il_raffa, Michael Gaskill
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • What happens if you go here? – NathanOliver Jun 12 '17 at 18:20
  • @NathanOliver I see a blank draft with nothing in it. – cs95 Jun 12 '17 at 18:21
  • Bummer. Maybe a dev can help. – NathanOliver Jun 12 '17 at 18:23
  • 1
    Welp, that's 2 hours of my day gone. – cs95 Jun 12 '17 at 18:24
  • 1
    I can try to pull it from the database. It'll make it a bit easier if you have the URL of the draft and some idea of what the text was. (We probably need to look at making the UI clearer or less error-prone too.) – Jon Ericson Jun 12 '17 at 19:45
  • @JonEricson Apologies... I don't have the link. However, I DO believe I saved the draft multiple times before it was accidentally deleted. The title of the documentation was "Python Lex-Yacc". It was a separate topic, not part of anything else. – cs95 Jun 12 '17 at 19:47
  • Ok. It's not in the place I've found lost drafts in the past. Let me dig a bit more and see if I can find it. (If it's any consolation, I always find my second draft to be much better than the first.) – Jon Ericson Jun 12 '17 at 19:57
  • @JonEricson I really appreciate the help. But, if you can't find it, that's all right. I still have a non-formatted text dump of the same thing on my local machine - I'll just have to sit and format it again. – cs95 Jun 12 '17 at 19:59
  • @JonEricson Any luck? Or should I start working on it again? – cs95 Jun 12 '17 at 20:48
  • I'm afraid not. I did find this draft, but your latest draft is simply blank in the database. Sorry about that. – Jon Ericson Jun 12 '17 at 20:53
  • @JonEricson Thank you for trying. Should I vote to close this question? I don't see any point to it being open anymore. – cs95 Jun 12 '17 at 20:54
  • 1
    We are considering cleaning up the flow here, since it's too easy to have this sort of problem. Closing is fine, but it's not a problem to leave open. – Jon Ericson Jun 12 '17 at 20:56
  • I think I have your draft... lemme pull the contents into something usable. – Adam Lear Jun 12 '17 at 21:17
4

Better idea than trying to copy markdown out of multiple DB fields... here's the link to your retracted proposed change: https://stackoverflow.com/documentation/review/changes/144625.

It should have all the content you can copy/paste into a new draft.

And like Jon said, we're going to take a look at that entire workflow. You're absolutely right - it's far too easy right now to do something destructive.


Example Title: Getting Started

Markdown:

    To get started, install the package by following the steps outlined below:

       1. Download the source code [here](http://www.dabeaz.com/ply/ply-3.10.tar.gz).
       2. Unzip the folder, then navigate into that directory.
       3. From your terminal, run `python setup.py install`. 

    If all goes well, you should be good to go! If you have any issues, make sure you've `setuptools` installed.

Example Title: Part 1: Tokenising Input with Lex

Markdown:

        import ply.lex as lex

        # List of token names. This is always required
        tokens = [
           'NUMBER',
           'PLUS',
           'MINUS',
           'TIMES',
           'DIVIDE',
           'LPAREN',
           'RPAREN',
        ]

        # Regular expression rules for simple tokens
        t_PLUS    = r'\+'
        t_MINUS   = r'-'
        t_TIMES   = r'\*'
        t_DIVIDE  = r'/'
        t_LPAREN  = r'\('
        t_RPAREN  = r'\)'

        # A regular expression rule with some action code
        def t_NUMBER(t):
            r'\d+'
            t.value = int(t.value)    
            return t

        # Define a rule so we can track line numbers
        def t_newline(t):
            r'\n+'
            t.lexer.lineno += len(t.value)

        # A string containing ignored characters (spaces and tabs)
        t_ignore  = ' \t'

        # Error handling rule
        def t_error(t):
            print("Illegal character '%s'" % t.value[0])
            t.lexer.skip(1)

        # Build the lexer
        lexer = lex.lex()

        # Give the lexer some input
        lexer.input(data)

        # Tokenize
        while True:
            tok = lexer.token()
            if not tok: 
                break      # No more input
            print(tok)

Save this file as `caltlex.py`. We'll be using this when building our Yacc parser.

---

**Breakdown of the Syntax**

1. Import the module using `import ply.lex`

2. All lexers must provide a list `tokens` that defines all of the possible token names that can be produced by the lexer. This list is always required.

        tokens = [
           'NUMBER',
           'PLUS',
           'MINUS',
           'TIMES',
           'DIVIDE',
           'LPAREN',
           'RPAREN',
        ]

`tokens` could also be a tuple of strings (rather than a string), where each string denotes a token as before.

3. The regex rule for each string may be defined either as a string or as a function. In either case, the variable name should be prefixed by t_ to denote it is a rule for matching tokens.
   * For simple tokens, the regular expression can be specified as strings: `t_PLUS = r'\+'`

   * If some kind of action needs to be performed, a token rule can be specified as a function. 

            def t_NUMBER(t):
                r'\d+'
                t.value = int(t.value)
                return t
     Note, the rule is specified as a doc string within the function. The function accepts one argument which is an instance of `LexToken`, performs some action and then returns back the argument. 

     If you want to use an external string as the regex rule for the function instead of specifying a doc string, consider the following example:

            @TOKEN(identifier)         # identifier is a string holding the regex
            def t_ID(t):
                ...      # actions

    * An instance of `LexToken` object (let's call this object `t`) has the following attributes:
       1) `t.type` which is the token type (as a string) (eg: `'NUMBER'`, `'PLUS'`, etc). By default, `t.type` is set to the name following the `t_` prefix.
       2) `t.value` which is the lexeme (the actual text matched) 
       3) `t.lineno` which is the current line number (this is not automatically updated, as the lexer knows nothing of line numbers). Update lineno using a function called `t_newline`.

         ## 

            def t_newline(t):
                r'\n+'
                t.lexer.lineno += len(t.value)

         ##
         4) `t.lexpos` which is the position of the token relative to the beginning of the input text. 

   - If nothing is returned from a regex rule function, the token is discarded. If you want to discard a token, you can alternatively add t_ignore_ prefix to a regex rule variable instead of defining a function for the same rule.

            def t_COMMENT(t):
                r'\#.*'
                pass
                # No return value. Token discarded

        ...Is the same as:

            t_ignore_COMMENT = r'\#.*'
     ##

      <sup>This is of course invalid if you're carrying out some action when you see a comment. In which case, use a function to define the regex rule.</sup> 

      If you haven't defined a token for some characters but still want to ignore it, use `t_ignore = "<characters to ignore>"` (these prefixes are necessary):          

            t_ignore_COMMENT = r'\#.*'
            t_ignore  = ' \t'    # ignores spaces and tabs

     ##
    - When building the master regex, lex will add the regexes specified in the file as follows: 
        1) Tokens defined by functions are added in the same order as they appear in the file. 
        2) Tokens defined by strings are added in decreasing order of the string length of the string defining the regex for that token.

      If you are matching `==` and `=` in the same file, take advantage of these rules.
    ##
      - Literals are tokens that are returned as they are. Both `t.type` and `t.value` will be set to the character itself.
Define a list of literals as such:

            literals = [ '+', '-', '*', '/' ]

         or,

            literals = "+-*/"

        ##

        It is possible to write token functions that perform additional actions when literals are matched. However, you'll need to set the token type appropriately. For example:

            literals = [ '{', '}' ]

            def t_lbrace(t):
                r'\{'
                t.type = '{'  # Set token type to the expected literal (ABSOLUTE MUST if this is a literal)
                return t

      ##
    - Handle errors with t_error function.

          # Error handling rule
          def t_error(t):
              print("Illegal character '%s'" % t.value[0])
              t.lexer.skip(1) # skip the illegal token (don't process it)

        In general, `t.lexer.skip(n)` skips n characters in the input string.

  4. Final preparations:

       Build the lexer using `lexer = lex.lex()`.

      ##
        You can also put everything inside a class and call use instance of the class to define the lexer. Eg:

      ##  
          import ply.lex as lex  
          class MyLexer(object):            
                ...     # everything relating to token rules and error handling comes here as usual 

                # Build the lexer
                def build(self, **kwargs):
                    self.lexer = lex.lex(module=self, **kwargs)

                def test(self, data):
                    self.lexer.input(data)
                    for token in self.lexer.token():
                        print(token)

                # Build the lexer and try it out

          m = MyLexer()
          m.build()           # Build the lexer
          m.test("3 + 4")     #

      Provide input using `lexer.input(data)` where data is a string 

      To get the tokens, use `lexer.token()` which returns tokens matched. You can iterate over lexer in a loop as in:

      ##

         for i in lexer: 
             print(i)

Example Title: Part 2: Parsing Tokenised Input with Yacc

Markdown:

    # Yacc example

    import ply.yacc as yacc

    # Get the token map from the lexer. This is required.
    from calclex import tokens

    def p_expression_plus(p):
        'expression : expression PLUS term'
        p[0] = p[1] + p[3]

    def p_expression_minus(p):
        'expression : expression MINUS term'
        p[0] = p[1] - p[3]

    def p_expression_term(p):
        'expression : term'
        p[0] = p[1]

    def p_term_times(p):
        'term : term TIMES factor'
        p[0] = p[1] * p[3]

    def p_term_div(p):
        'term : term DIVIDE factor'
        p[0] = p[1] / p[3]

    def p_term_factor(p):
        'term : factor'
        p[0] = p[1]

    def p_factor_num(p):
        'factor : NUMBER'
        p[0] = p[1]

    def p_factor_expr(p):
        'factor : LPAREN expression RPAREN'
        p[0] = p[2]

    # Error rule for syntax errors
    def p_error(p):
        print("Syntax error in input!")

    # Build the parser
    parser = yacc.yacc()

    while True:
       try:
           s = raw_input('calc > ')
       except EOFError:
           break
       if not s: continue
       result = parser.parse(s)
       print(result)

---
**Breakdown of the Syntax** 

- Each grammar rule is defined by a function where the docstring to that function contains the appropriate context-free grammar specification. The statements that make up the function body implement the semantic actions of the rule. Each function accepts a single argument p that is a sequence containing the values of each grammar symbol in the corresponding rule. The values of `p[i]` are mapped to grammar symbols as shown here:

        def p_expression_plus(p):
            'expression : expression PLUS term'
            #   ^            ^        ^    ^
            #  p[0]         p[1]     p[2] p[3]

            p[0] = p[1] + p[3]


- For tokens, the "value" of the corresponding `p[i]` is the same as the `p.value` attribute assigned in the lexer module. So, `PLUS` will have the value `+`. 

- For non-terminals, the value is determined by whatever is placed in `p[0]`. If nothing is placed, the value is None.
Also, `p[-1]` is not the same as `p[3]`, since `p` is not a simple list (`p[-1]` can specify embedded actions (not discussed here)).

Note that the function can have any name, as long as it is preceeded by `p_`.

- The `p_error(p)` rule is defined to catch syntax errors (same as `yyerror` in yacc/bison).

- Multiple grammar rules can be combined into a single function, which is a good idea if productions have a similar structure.

        def p_binary_operators(p):
            '''expression : expression PLUS term
                          | expression MINUS term
               term       : term TIMES factor
                          | term DIVIDE factor'''
            if p[2] == '+':
                p[0] = p[1] + p[3]
            elif p[2] == '-':
                p[0] = p[1] - p[3]
            elif p[2] == '*':
                p[0] = p[1] * p[3]
            elif p[2] == '/':
                p[0] = p[1] / p[3] 

- Character literals can be used instead of tokens.

        def p_binary_operators(p):
            '''expression : expression '+' term
                          | expression '-' term
               term       : term '*' factor
                          | term '/' factor'''
            if p[2] == '+':
                p[0] = p[1] + p[3]
            elif p[2] == '-':
                p[0] = p[1] - p[3]
            elif p[2] == '*':
                p[0] = p[1] * p[3]
            elif p[2] == '/':
                p[0] = p[1] / p[3]

  Of course, the literals must be specified in the lexer module.

- Empty productions have the form `'''symbol : '''`

- To explicitly set the start symbol, use `start = 'foo'`, where `foo` is some non-terminal.

- Setting precedence and associativity can be done using the precedence variable.

   ##
        precedence = (
            ('nonassoc', 'LESSTHAN', 'GREATERTHAN'),  # Nonassociative operators
            ('left', 'PLUS', 'MINUS'),
            ('left', 'TIMES', 'DIVIDE'),
            ('right', 'UMINUS'),            # Unary minus operator
        )

   Tokens are ordered from lowest to highest precedence. `nonassoc` means that those tokens do not associate. This means that something like `a < b < c` is illegal whereas `a < b` is still legal.

- `parser.out` is a debugging file that is created when the yacc program is executed for the first time. Whenever a shift/reduce conflict occurs, the parser always shifts.

Example Title: Calculator with PLY

Markdown:

Here's another example which combines lex and yacc into one succinct program. The program takes a simple arithmetic expression as input and attempts to parse the input and calculate the result. 

    from ply import lex
    import ply.yacc as yacc

    tokens = (
        'PLUS',
        'MINUS',
        'TIMES',
        'DIV',
        'LPAREN',
        'RPAREN',
        'NUMBER',
    )

    t_ignore = ' \t'

    t_PLUS   = r'\+'
    t_MINUS  = r'-'
    t_TIMES  = r'\*'
    t_DIV    = r'/'
    t_LPAREN = r'\('
    t_RPAREN = r'\)'

    def t_NUMBER( t ) :
        r'[0-9]+'
        t.value = int( t.value )
        return t

    def t_newline( t ):
      r'\n+'
      t.lexer.lineno += len( t.value )

    def t_error( t ):
      print("Invalid Token:",t.value[0])
      t.lexer.skip( 1 )

    lexer = lex.lex()

    precedence = (
        ( 'left', 'PLUS', 'MINUS' ),
        ( 'left', 'TIMES', 'DIV' ),
        ( 'nonassoc', 'UMINUS' )
    )

    def p_add( p ) :
        'expr : expr PLUS expr'
        p[0] = p[1] + p[3]

    def p_sub( p ) :
        'expr : expr MINUS expr'
        p[0] = p[1] - p[3]

    def p_expr2uminus( p ) :
        'expr : MINUS expr %prec UMINUS'
        p[0] = - p[2]

    def p_mult_div( p ) :
        '''expr : expr TIMES expr
                | expr DIV expr'''

        if p[2] == '*' :
            p[0] = p[1] * p[3]
        else :
            if p[3] == 0 :
                print("Can't divide by 0")
                raise ZeroDivisionError('integer division by 0')
            p[0] = p[1] / p[3]

    def p_expr2NUM( p ) :
        'expr : NUMBER'
        p[0] = p[1]

    def p_parens( p ) :
        'expr : LPAREN expr RPAREN'
        p[0] = p[2]

    def p_error( p ):
        print("Syntax error in input!")

    parser = yacc.yacc()

    res = parser.parse("-4*-(3-5)")
    print(res)

Output:

    -8
  • Thing is... I've got the content with me backed up. The formatting was what I lost, that took me 2 hours. I really appreciate it. So close! – cs95 Jun 12 '17 at 21:22
  • @Coldspeed Ah, I can still pull the markdown, I think... give me a few here. – Adam Lear Jun 12 '17 at 21:23
  • @Coldspeed See my edit. If you copy the "code" blocks as is, they should be valid markdown that you can directly paste into examples in a new draft. – Adam Lear Jun 12 '17 at 21:32
  • Magnificent!!! If I could award bounties for meta posts, I would. Thanks a lot! – cs95 Jun 12 '17 at 21:35
  • @Coldspeed Glad I could help. :) – Adam Lear Jun 12 '17 at 21:35

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