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The roots of recent problems I have raised on Meta are mostly about a feeling that is common amongst regular users: that the tools Stack Overflow offers are inadequate for the task. This leads to repeated what have you tried comments, and requests to see the (usually non-existent) code that the OP is having trouble with. It also brings about what I believe is considered to be "gaming" of the system, whereby the reason given to close a slovenly post is usually one of unclear, too broad or off topic—insufficient information.

Since it is a recent post, and because it alerted me to my misunderstanding, this is with particular regard to Matt's post in a recent Meta question of mine on Meta:

In its current form the question is clear. Yes, it is a "give me the codez question", which shows little research, but you'll note we purposefully don't have that as a close reason. As for the question being disliked? We don't have a close reason for that

This is in no other way a follow-up to that previous question.

I am interested in "we purposefully don't have that as a close reason", but reading that link I see no explanation of that purpose. George Stocker writes:

Overall, there isn't and never has been a close reason simply for a lazy person. If you'd like to propose one, I suggest asking a new meta question and making it a feature request.

But having seen the fate of such requests I am not foolish enough to try again.

From what I have read, I get the impression that questions such:

  • What is an "int"?

  • How do I add two numbers

  • How can I make this code that I found do what I want

  • Please show me how to write this C program in Lua

are all purposefully ineligible for a close vote, and the correct response is simply to downvote them.

I now have the perception that I am playing in Stack Overflow's forum where there are rules that few people like but which no one intends to explain to me. That is perfectly valid and I am happy with that as long as I understand that it is so, but it upsets me as I understood the site to be at least minimally democratic. I hope that someone will confirm it or correct me.

However I am still left with the concern that, since question like the above are only eligible for down votes, we are left with the situation where there should be many thousands of tumbleweed questions which are immune to closure but have dozens or hundreds of down votes. Even the diamond ♦ people have expressed concern that a question with a dozen or so down votes should be kept alive, but it seems that it is the "playing of the system" and wrongly-placed close votes that does the culling of such posts. If I'm right then Stack Overflow's infrastructure is hanging by a thread, and I hope someone will put me right.

Once more, please note that I am declaring only my ignorance regarding a situation that I feel I am understanding less every day. This is Jeff Attwood's playground and he can place whatever rules he likes with my blessing. I am simply looking for confirmation that my perception is right, correction to anything that I may have misunderstood, and any additional observations that people may want to offer.

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Please help me to understand close reasons

You get the close options. The reason we close is to fix problems with the question so that great answerers like yourself do not spend your time on such questions until they have been fixed.

I want to be able to make a useful contribution here, and at present I am bemused about how I can do so

If I were you, and decided the question was not worth keeping, I would downvote, vote to close if there's an appropriate reason, and then move on. But we hold/close questions so they can get fixed.

From the site help:

Questions that are edited within five days of being put on hold are automatically added to a reopening queue for community review. Questions that are not reopened within five days will change from [on hold] to [closed].

Each closed or on-hold question provides a reason that helps the original poster (or other community members) know what they'd need to do in order to get the question reopened.

Our great answerers are a valuable resource to the site. We can't please everyone. But this site's operations are biased in favor of the answerers.

Nevertheless, the goal of closing is to get the question fixed so it can be answered.

"give me the codez question"

Yeah, these are almost always pretty bad. But if the question is a "how do I?" (and on-topic) then it could be answered - and people looking for the answer probably don't care what the asker tried since it probably didn't work (hence their question.)

So while we let you downvote such questions as much as you like, you can't close it just for that reason.

In fact, we reward answering downvoted questions with the "reversal" badge, although its awarding on Stack Overflow is pretty rare, only 274 at this time.

"What have you tried?"

This comment was actually blocked (and still is as far as I know) - because we consider it rude. I'd avoid variations on it unless you need the information to answer the question properly, and only then I'd try to give a bit of explanation so that it is not read as rude, like: "I think it would help us answer your question if you show us what you've tried so far."

many thousands of tumbleweed questions which are immune to closure but have dozens or hundreds of down votes

I'm not too worried about these - in spite of the apparent badness of the questions - there can be ostensibly worthwhile answers to them. Even if those answers are something like:

  • An Int is a type that...
  • Addition works like this:...
  • You'd need to modify that code to do...
  • To translate that from C to Lua you'd do...

You'll probably never have to see them. If they ever do become a problem, we'll probably change the criteria for such Q&A to be roomba'd.

Until they're deleted, they do have the potential to be answered and help people.

And that's a good thing.

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    That's very useful. Thank you. If it's even close to the "official" stance, should there be such a thing, then I think it needs to be publicised very much more. As it stands, there are many answerers who see the rules and the non-committal answers on Meta as being obtuse and combative. I wrote this question with an open mind and got a similarly dismissive response from several people. I don't see how that was deserved, but your answer has made it worthwhile. There is probably more information that would be useful but this is an excellent start. – Borodin Jun 11 '17 at 20:16
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    I would not call that badge very rewarding given popularity of the proposal to Get rid of the Reversal badge. There seem to be fairly wide agreement that this badge tends to promote undesirable behavior, at least in its current form – gnat Jun 13 '17 at 11:09
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    "So while we let you downvote such questions as much as you like, you can't close it just for that reason. " No that's nonsense. One of the reasons we close questions is that we want to keep as much trash and noise away from the site as possible. We close "give me the codez" questions because those are hated by the community. There is an overwhelming community consensus that these questions should not be allowed. So if there exists an explicit close reason or not is quite irrelevant, such questions should be closed. Mostly people pick "too broad" for closing them and that's fine. – Lundin Jun 14 '17 at 9:41
  • That's why I said, "I would downvote, vote to close if there's an appropriate reason, and then move on." and "Yeah, these are almost always pretty bad." - but here's an example where I took a too-broad question, fixed and answered it (admittedly not gimme teh codez...). You don't have to do this, but it does create value for the site if the asker learns and improves their future questioning and we get more questions of better quality. – Aaron Hall Jun 14 '17 at 14:26
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    if the asker learns and improves their future questioning doesn't happen. In my experience, what the asker learns is that they can post any lazy, effortless question they like here, ignore any complaints about it, and someone will come along and reward them with an answer anyway to grab a few reputation points, so they continue to ask the same type of questions in the future. – Ken White Jun 14 '17 at 17:09
  • everyone just votes to close these type of question with some random reason anyway, usually "too broad", even if they are not actually to broad. so i don't understand what SO is trying to accomplish by not giving us an accurate close reason. but then again, I don't understand much of what SO is trying to accomplish in general these days... – nhouser9 Jun 14 '17 at 17:52
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However I am still left with the concern that, since question like the above are only eligible for down votes, we are left with the situation where there should be many thousands of tumbleweed questions which are immune to closure but have dozens or hundreds of down votes.

This concern is valid, that is why there is the roomba. The roomba will effectively remove some of these types of posts. Namely dead and abandoned questions.

The criteria for dead posts:

The Community user will automatically delete old abandoned/dead questions in the following circumstances:

If the question is more than 30 days old, and ...

  • has −1 or lower score
  • has no answers
  • is not locked
    ... or ...
  • it was closed and migrated to a different site
    ... or ...
  • it was migrated from a different site, and then rejected

... it will be automatically deleted. These are termed "dead" questions (RemoveDeadQuestions, RemoveMigrationStubs in the case of a migration or RemoveRejectedMigrations in the case of a rejected migration).

The criteria for abandoned posts:

If the question is more than 365 days old, and ...

  • has a score of 0 or less, or a score of 1 and a deleted owner
  • has no answers
  • is not locked
  • has view count <= the age of the question in days times 1.5
  • has 1 or 0 comments

... it will be automatically deleted. These are termed "abandoned" questions (RemoveAbandonedQuestions).

As a result of these automatic deletions, there is often guidelines of downvote and move on, where the sort of implicit logic is that the roomba will delete them so you are in essence casting a delete vote with your downvote on these types of questions.

It is exceedingly rare for a question to garner dozens or even hundreds of downvotes without triggering the roomba.

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    It is exceedingly rare for a question to garner dozens or even hundreds of downvotes without triggering the roomba. Except someone provides an answer – Thomas Schremser Jun 14 '17 at 8:35
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    @ThomasSchremser interesting that we are prohibited to say what we think about those answering such questions – gnat Jun 14 '17 at 12:28
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    By exceedingly rare, I mean roughly one in 100,000 posts falls into the category of more than a dozen downvotes. Or, exactly 185 out of the current 13,428,518 questions. There is exactly a 0% occurrence of -100 or worse on any post at Stack Overflow (-76 being the lowest). So, if you perhaps mean to say that in the entire history of Stack Overflow, these 185 answers are the issue, then perhaps you should re-examine your priorities. – Travis J Jun 14 '17 at 17:45

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