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So I've found myself asking seemingly valid questions lately that show that I have researched the problem, and yet I repeatedly receive down votes, even when I post an answer to the problem that nobody else has come up with.

I feel like these are questions that add to the community that other people may actually be searching for, and it is frustrating to actually lose reputation for trying to contribute to the community.

I am honestly at a loss as to why my questions are being down-voted so frequently when my questions have remained the same. It almost seems like there is an epidemic of down-voting on the site, but I am determined that it must be me.

So I am asking for a discussion to help me improve my question quality so that I can contribute to the community without losing reputation for doing so.

Here is an example question: Loading JSON Without HTTP Request

I have clearly researched and found several ways of loading JSON files, however none that meet my requirements. So I asked if anyone had a solution.

I got many answers that posted solutions I had already found and discussed in the question as being unsuitable for my needs, of which I only down-voted one because I was trying to be nice, even though it seemed they had not even read the question. One person even suggested that I load them from the assets folder via an HTTP request, despite the fact that the title of the question is actually "How to load JSON without an HTTP request".

At the end of the day I found a great solution using require, so I posted it, and it got down-voted. That's fine, maybe somebody just didn't like the fact that it wasn't particularly in-depth or there was a typo or something. Since I was busy at work I just deleted it figuring I would post a more in-depth answer in the morning.

I came back today and my question actually had two down-votes.

Was I not clear in my question? Was it too general? Did it seem like I hadn't been searching for hours despite having searched for hours? I didn't see any similar questions on Stack Overflow that seemed obvious, and in fact the majority of links people posted were to solutions I had already considered and dismissed.

What was it about this question that turned it into a train wreck?

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    Given the number of comments on your question I would say your question is unclear. Why didn't you add an example of the file you try to read? Why didn't you share a small piece of code that shows what you tried, or at least what you expect the code would look like. – rene Jun 2 '17 at 14:15
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    One thing you neglected to include is the module framework you were using, which is the reason no one could suggest require. The functionality is not built into Angular as far as I know. If you write an answer with that, it's based on information you didn't share in the question, which is kind of unfair to the previous answerers. – Heretic Monkey Jun 2 '17 at 15:22
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Was I not clear in my question?

No, you were not clear as the number of comments indicate that user are confused by your question

Was it too general?

I'm not sure about that as I'm not an Angular dev but in general I have doubts when questions are asked about a coding problem without any code in the question. It is not impossible but if you do, your post has to be spot-on.

Did it seem like I hadn't been searching for hours despite having searched for hours? I didn't see any similar questions on Stack Overflow that seemed obvious, and in fact the majority of links people posted were to solutions I had already considered and dismissed.

No, it is not clear at all that you spend hours as you didn't include any of the solutions you tried, nor how they failed to reach your goal. Nor did you share which documentation you found, read or applied.

I think the question can use one or two tried attempts with an explanation what didn't work (errors, or functional incorrect). Maybe the post is more clear if you at least include how you envision the code should work.

I'm not sure if relevant but as this is brought up in the comments: If you think it matters that this is Angular 2 (the one which uses TypeScript) and not traditional Angular then don't rely on tags to convey that difference. If you expect what you're attempting to achieve is more difficult due to the use of TypeScript, I would certainly include that

  • Is it even worth going back and fixing it at this point and adding my answer in a more complex manner? – StephenRios Jun 2 '17 at 15:18
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    Improving posts is always worth it, there is no dead-line on that @StephenRios – rene Jun 2 '17 at 17:15
  • I have updated the question, and posted a more succinct answer. If you would be so kind, I wouldn't mind a review of the new question and answer if you have time. – StephenRios Jun 2 '17 at 19:22
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    That looks much better to me @StephenRios and I hope the users that follow that tag and/or future visitors will agree. Time will learn. – rene Jun 2 '17 at 19:44

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