34

Situation:

I've seen 1 particular user make a lot of minor edits (over a course of many days) that are incomplete. This user now has 2000+ rep so his edits don't need reviews anymore, but the first 200/300 edits have been made under 2000 rep (calculated).

Example:

public void Q()
         {
                               DoSomething();
         }

bunch of text with spelling/grammar mistakes


Turns in to:

public void Q()
{
                               DoSomething();
}

bunch of text with spelling/grammar mistakes


Note he only moved the brackets, the content still isn't properly indented and there are lots of words/sentences to be edited. Even if you yourself are not good in English you could still format the full code instead of only the brackets.

Problem:
If someone under 2000 rep does an edit like that it will likely only get approved by robo reviewers. This behavior is the opposite of what I've been taught about editing on stack overflow and thus should not be allowed. I've already posted a comment on one of the users questions but he keeps on making small useless edits I later on encounter and usually fix.

What should I do in this case? Just let it go because the user is not filling the review queue or flag it for moderator attention?

  • 6
    Well some say it is too minor and the editor should fix all issues in a post, others say that each improvement is a good edit, even when other issues aren't fix and "too minor" rejection has been removed anyway, so I would skip it. Doesn't look like SO has a clear guideline here. – Tom May 19 '17 at 11:51
  • 15
    @Tom IMHO people under 2k rep definitely shouldn't do those edits as it fills up the review queue. He could leave the grammar/spelling alone too for all I care but only brackets (or comparable stuff) just bugs me – EpicKip May 19 '17 at 11:53
  • I agree on that, but the review queue doesn't give you a proper rejection reason anymore (since "too minor" has been removed). You still can try "no improvements", but it's description doesn't match to any "too minor" situation. Or you choose "reject and edit", but this requires more work on your part. – Tom May 19 '17 at 12:09
  • 6
    If you have a more extensive edit, the reviewers should use "Reject and edit", don't waste an opportunity to fix stuff. The reviewers are the ones that are being lazy. – Braiam May 19 '17 at 12:35
  • 4
    @Braiam 1. I can't review edits yet :) 2. The reviewers aren't lazy, everyone does this in their time for free. The lazy one is the editor that just wants the dahm gold badge. But I get your point, I usually come across those types of edits and indeed improve them. – EpicKip May 19 '17 at 12:38
  • 19
    @Braiam Odd that you think not taking the time to fix someone else's mistake for them is the one being lazy, and the person who's benefiting from creating work for other people while adding nothing of value is the one who's not lazy. The reviewer who takes the time to fix someone else's bad edit is going above and beyond what's expected of them, and the editor who's submitting an edit that's causing more problems than it is adding value, just because they personally benefit from that harmful action, is the one being lazy. – Servy May 19 '17 at 13:24
  • 1
    For a user with over 2K rep, if the edit isn't harmful in any way, I'd just let it go. I don't think it helps anyone to bump a post with major issues back to the top of the active queue but the help center only says that trivial edits are discouraged. There isn't currently anything on Meta to say that we should take action against users that do this. Unless a moderator posts an answer saying, "Yes, we'd like to know when this happens so we can do something" then I wouldn't do anything. – BSMP May 19 '17 at 14:36
  • 1
    @Servy you are a reviewer: just review. If you want to reject someone as "too minor" you have to demonstrate what is missing by editing it yourself! – Braiam May 19 '17 at 15:02
  • 5
    @Braiam If you can't edit properly you shouldn't in the first place period. – EpicKip May 19 '17 at 15:32
  • 4
    @Braiam you are a reviewer: just review. Sure. And if an edit is a bad edit because it's not actually adding meaningful value, determining that it merits rejection is reviewing it. If you just want to go around editing posts, then go around finding posts that need editing and edit them, rather than reviewing edits. If you want to review edits, then you've made the decision to review edits, not just edit posts that someone else couldn't be bothered to edit properly (but submitted an edit for anyway). – Servy May 19 '17 at 15:41
  • 3
    Who's talking about the editor? Read Servy's comment and take it into context. If you are going to reject an edit because it didn't fix all the stuff,YOU SHOULD FIX THEM YOURSELF THEN, that's why too minor went away, there's not minor edit. – Braiam May 19 '17 at 15:56
  • 6
    If you complain that the editor is doing ignoring the big picture, you can't ignore it too! If you see a post with stuff that needs to be fixed, don't sit on your hands and do nothing about it, fix them, irrespectively how you found the post! – Braiam May 19 '17 at 17:15
  • 2
    I recently earned the ability to edit without review (>2k), but IIRC, when my edits went into review, SO has a page explaining not to add "trivial" edits - edits that aren't needed like language translation, misspellings, capitalization, etc. Most of my edits were code formatting changes more meaningful that the OP's example and were accepted. But nowadays my reviewing is mostly like my behavior previously - I reject many language-only edits unless they actually add something. Reject and Edit? I reserve that for an edit that does add something but is IMO incomplete. – dfd May 20 '17 at 12:16
  • 3
    @dfd if the edit adds something actually you should use Improve edit. Reject and edit is for "[i]f you feel strongly that a given edit does not go far enough to improve a post", otherwise "if you can't in good faith discard the edit and you feel like re-editing the post is too much work for this... Then it probably isn't actually too minor at all. Approve it and let everyone get on with their lives." – Braiam May 20 '17 at 18:29
  • 2
    if one suggests to change one occurrence of "i" to an "I" leaving the other occurrences untouched, I clearly reject the suggestion. Sometimes I "reject and edit", but not always, depending on the amount of work required. – Cœur May 22 '17 at 8:37
8

The reject reason reads:

no improvement whatsoever
This edit does not make the post even a little bit easier to read, easier to find, more accurate or more accessible. Changes are either completely superfluous or actively harm readability.

If a question has some severe problems and an edit does nothing to address those problems, then that's "no improvement whatsoever". You can make all the minor improvements to a code snippet you want, but if the question is unclear (or otherwise off-topic) then no (minor) edits to the code will change that (and if the question is already closed it may actually do more harm than good).

In other examples the edits may be more helpful; editing badly formatted code is useful. But if it's just editing one tiny aspect of the code while leaving a lot of problems intact then it's obviously not really improving anything; I would also reject this for the same reasons.

In your particular example, it's just changing stuff from code style A to code style B (indenting the braces like that is used in some code styles), so that would be a valid reject reason on its own.


Should you flag this user? Difficult to say, as I only have one example to go on. It depends on the value of their edits as well as the frequency of them. Some of their edits – even small ones – may be more useful.

I have flagged users for consistently making bad edits once or twice, and those flags have been marked "helpful". I probably wouldn't bother with this particular user though (especially since they already passed the 2k rep limit).

  • Wasn't really talking about reject as I can't review edits yet. But your last part about flagging was helpful +1 – EpicKip May 22 '17 at 10:12
  • Oh, didn't even notice that @EpicKip. Nonetheless, it is relevant here, because before establishing whether or not a user should be reported, we should first establish whether or not this users behaviour is appropriate ;-) – Martin Tournoij May 22 '17 at 10:16
  • That is true indeed! – EpicKip May 22 '17 at 10:17

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