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(Removed the post from Meta and posting here on Meta SO instead, as per the response I received on Meta)

The SO question that got me interested in this type of phenomenon.

Minor caveat: It's not proven yet that this is a case of the XY problem, since OP has not yet responded to confirm or deny.
However, I am interested in the general approach to these sorts of questions, so I am going to assume it is a case of the XY problem for the purposes of my post.

The Y problem presented by the OP can very quickly be redirected to an already existing solution. At the time of writing, there are 3 closing votes for just this reason.
Edit The question is now closed.

However, the X problem is currently still unknown. If the OP actually updates his question, we might see a different problem emerge that is not easily referrable to a previously answered question.

I'm worried about the precedent this sets. If we blindly refer OP to an established answer to his Y problem, we are implicitly stating that he should be using Y as the solution (since it is a well established problem that has been approached and answered in the past).
This also carries over to any future visitor who is looking for help with a similar Y solution, who will see that the past OP was immediately referred to the existing duplicate question.

It seems to me that we should prioritize confirming it's an XY problem before we close the question, to prevent implicitly calling Y a good solution to problem X.
But that's my question to you. Am I wrong about this? How can we best approach this when it happens?

Note: I am not asking about posting an answer that helps with the Y problem. I see no issue with that (not every poster can realize something is an XY problem). I am asking about closing and referring the question, which deincentivizes OP (and future visitors with similar questions) from actually reevaluating his proposed Y solution.


Edit This addition comes from the comments.

I've had feedback that mentions that the OP is responsible for asking the right question. While I believe that to be true in general, I think the XY problem is inherently different in this regard. OP is blinded by the first solution he could think of, and not considering different avenues (potentially not even aware of their existence, maybe it's simply a temporary matter of fixating on the problem for too long).

There is more than enough precedent for this on SO already:

  • Even if the OP asks directly about string concatenation, when it is clear he is composing SQL queries, any answer that uses string concatenation receives downvotes for not considering the dangers of SQL injection. StackOverflow holds the answer to a higher standard than OP is expecting.
  • It is widely accepted to offer alternative solutions to OP and not adhere to the strict rules OP initially asked about. This is already the case and should not change. However, my current question here is about how blindly referring someone to the answer to the Y problem completely shuts out the possibility of getting the OP to reevaluate his options and consider the X problem; so he can maybe implement a different solution Z. If we already tell OP that "solution Y" is the best answer to his question (to a point where we disallow any other answer to still be given), we directly influence whether he will look for better alternatives. Because a StackOverflow answer is expected to be an expert's help (in the eyes of the OP), the OP is therefore incentivized to listen to the expert's opinion.
  • I'd like to add another example: In this question the same thing happened. If one question is a duplicate, but someone spotted another problem with the code and therefore the answers to the questions of which it would be a duplicate would not suffice, I'd say answer anyway, do not flag as a duplicate and hope that enough people see that you've spotted another problem, aside from the duplicate problem, and won't vote / flag the post. – Douwe de Haan May 18 '17 at 12:21
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    @DouwedeHaan: Thanks for the extra input :) But I think it is (often) inherently impossible to already answer such a question, as the XY problem usually presents itself as a question about only the Y problem. We need to ask OP for clarification to stumble onto the X problem. As mentioned in the "XY problem" discussion, this works for instant messaging but not for SO's slower back-and-forth communication. By the time OP clarifies, the question can already be closed. And reopening a question, while possible, is not guaranteed (from exp); plus OP may have already followed the referred Y answer. – Flater May 18 '17 at 12:26
  • I agree. It should be possible for users to apply for reopening their question with extra input (if that makes any sense) and let multiple people vote on it. I don't know exactly how that should be integrated in the website, like who can vote on such stuff etc. – Douwe de Haan May 18 '17 at 12:36
  • @Flater Do note that if you need a hand reopening a question feel free to stop by SOCVR and leave a [reopen-pls] request – NathanOliver May 18 '17 at 12:54
  • @DouwedeHaan: Doesn't the XY problem almost always point towards OP not being aware of the difference between X and Y? If they were aware of the XY issue, it wouldn't be a problem in the question that is asked. – Flater May 18 '17 at 13:02
  • @Flater Didn't think of it that way. I'm curious if others have a good opinion at this. – Douwe de Haan May 18 '17 at 13:05
  • @DouwedeHaan That's how it works now. If the user (or anyone else) edits their question after it's been closed, the question is automatically placed in the Reopen Queue for people to review. – Heretic Monkey May 18 '17 at 15:07
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    For the question, I'm not sure there's anything we need to do. We give users a lot of information on How to Ask and help center so that they can ask a well asked question. We close questions, with links to those resources, when they are not. If the user wants to edit their question to include more information about why their question is not a duplicate, they are free to do so. I think the problem lies in people throwing their hands up when their question gets closed like there's nothing they can do. – Heretic Monkey May 18 '17 at 15:10
  • @MikeMcCaughan: The XY problem is specific to this. The existence of the XY problem in a given question proves that OP is not differentiating X from Y. You're saying that you expect a poster to self-identify the XY problem in his own question, and then explain it in his question (to people more experienced than him) in order to have them reconsider reopening it? If he was capable of acknowledging that he is a victim to the XY problem, he would have never asked the Y question to begin with. – Flater May 18 '17 at 15:18
  • @MikeMcCaughan: More specifically to my question: Do you think that such a poster (unaware of the XY problem), when directed to a duplicate answer that answers the Y problem exactly, is still going to think about different ways to solve problem X? He already proved to not consider problem X because he posted a question about proposed solution Y (not X). This is the issue that I'm trying to bring to the table. It sets a bad precedent both for the OP and all future readers of the question. – Flater May 18 '17 at 15:19
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    I'm saying I expect the poster to give enough information in the question such that people can understand the X and the Y and/or to respond to comments asking about X. If the OP only asks about Y, why would you not mark it as a duplicate of Y? It seems like you're asking close voters to second guess every questioner. – Heretic Monkey May 18 '17 at 15:29
  • @MikeMcCaughan: The XY problem inherently states that the poster's proposed solution (Y) is a bad one. Maybe not technically impossible, but definitely not the way it should be approached. I have encountered countless SQL string concatenation posts where people downvoted any answer that directly used string + string (which is what the OP asked about) because it opens the door to SQL injection. The principle is clear: a bad (but technically working) answer is still a bad answer. Similarly, the proposed Y solution is inherently not a good solution. – Flater May 18 '17 at 15:34
  • @MikeMcCaughan Especially if SO saves questions for posterity's sake, must we not make sure that the question actually contains the right answer and not just the easiest referral to a duplicate answer that could be made? More often than not, the close vote will already pass before the OP is made aware that he has fallen victim to the XY problem. And since someone who posts the Y problem in the first place is not likely to consider different avenues (which is the core definition of the XY problem), wrongly referring him to a duplicate question provides him with the wrong answer. – Flater May 18 '17 at 15:37
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    Sure, but it's not up to us to babysit every user who doesn't know what they're doing, and doesn't want to know what they're doing. You've left a comment asking for clarification on the question linked here. I've not seen a response to the comment from the OP. What else do you expect people to do? Never close potential duplicates because this question might be that one special flower that's waiting to bloom? Again, if the user wishes to get the question reopened, there are many avenues to getting that done. – Heretic Monkey May 18 '17 at 15:41
  • @MikeMcCaughan: How can you be sure that the duplicate question OP is being referred to did not cause OP to not bother with updating his question anymore? If we can accurately refer him to a previously answered question, that inherently implies we refer him to the best solution for his problem. What would be the point to reevaluating your options if the experts you're asking help from have already (wrongly) claimed to know the best possible solution to your problem? – Flater May 18 '17 at 15:43
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I've had feedback that mentions that the OP is responsible for asking the right question

And I agree with that feedback, even in the case of the XY problem. Granted, it's a learned process. But it's still something that can and should be learned. And I don't think we should be refraining from closing questions that should be closed based on their literal content, on the outside chance that the author of that question really had some other question that they just didn't know to ask.

my current question here is about how blindly referring someone to the answer to the Y problem completely shuts out the possibility of getting the OP to reevaluate his options and consider the X problem

I disagree with the premise. Comments can still be posted to a closed question, or while voting to close is going on. Closing the question does not in any way "completely shut out" the ability to provide better assistance to the user. Users are notified of new comments, even on closed questions, and can read and consider them. A user not inclined to do so, is unlikely to be helped in any case.

And note: these comments should be aimed at getting the user to post a new question, not to edit the question at hand and seek to have it reopened. In a true XY problem situation, a revised question is going to be completely different, rendering any existing answers incorrect and negating whatever value the question had as a "signpost" for the correct duplicate. We certainly should not be encouraging that kind of thing. See "chameleon question" for more on that topic.


Stack Overflow is a unique situation, and I think it's important to keep in mind that Stack Overflow is not the only resource available to people seeking help, nor is it always the best one for them.

In the case of the XY problem, in the context of Stack Overflow, a person is indeed in a bit of a "rock, hard place" situation. If they ask about Y, they may be asking the wrong question, and very often specific implementation questions are duplicates. In any case, they might be getting only the answer that they asked for instead of the answer they didn't realize they needed. But if they ask about X, at a moment when they falsely believe that Y is the correct solution, their question may either not contain necessary details or the problem may simply be not narrowly-defined at that level. Either runs the risk of the question being closed as "too broad".

But, Stack Overflow's charter is not to help everyone who has any kind of question. And one thing that is very difficult is to get non-useful questions closed quickly enough. Especially very simple questions, like "how do I get a property value given a name?", people pile on to get their answers in as quickly as possible, rather than looking for a duplicate and voting to close the question. The longer we take to close such non-useful questions, the more the page, and thus the Stack Overflow database and search results, get polluted with content that adds nothing to the site's value.

(Indeed, I just saw this happen the other day. A very simple question asking how to use LINQ to get the sum of property values in a sequence of objects — a question that's been answered numerous times already over the years — yielded several people, including higher-rep folks who ought to know better, falling over themselves to post single-liners showing how to call the Sum() method, and then proceeding to even joke in the comments with each other about how they were racing, and who beat whom. This all occurred in the few short minutes it took me to look up the duplicate and close the question.)

So, as far as I'm concerned, the priority in this kind of situation is to get the question closed. It's well and good to add comments to the question to guide the person toward understanding their question in a way that gets them to ask the question they really should have asked, but the quality of the content on the site takes priority over the admirable goal of helping an individual. In the long run, we help more people by being potentially curt with such individuals, and so the greater good is served.

  • the quality of the content on the site takes priority over the admirable goal of helping an individual. I think this is putting the cart before the horse. Aren't we attempting to preserve the answers for posterity specifically so that we can (more easily) help others in the future? I.e. to prevent busywork with writing the same answer to the same question again and again; and to provide an existing answer to prevent unnecessary new questions keeping us from actually new questions. But the goal, as I understand it, is to help people who are in need of an explanation. – Flater May 19 '17 at 7:06
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    @Flater: please read the last sentence in my answer. It addresses your comment directly. Short term policies lead to success with that long term goal, only if those policies are adhered to. That includes closing questions as quickly as possible when they are not good novel questions. Indeed, this is exactly how we avoid "busywork with writing the same answer to the same question again and again". – Peter Duniho May 19 '17 at 7:09
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I'm worried about the precedent this sets. If we blindly refer OP to an established answer to his Y problem, we are implicitly stating that he should be using Y as the solution (since it is a well established problem that has been approached and answered in the past).

Not at all. If we close a question as a dupe, we are saying that the question as posed has already been asked and answered. It is not our responsibility, nor is it generally within our power, to discern whether the OP has asked the right question in the first place. Pretty much any question at all could be an XY question for the OP -- sometimes there are warning signs, but there don't have to be any.

This also carries over to any future visitor who is looking for help with a similar Y solution, who will see that the past OP was immediately referred to the existing duplicate question

I likewise reject that part of your assertion. In any case, we cannot we accept as our problem what the OP or someone who comes by later does with answers and / or dupe references to any question. Our responsibility is to do our best to elicit good questions, reject or fix bad questions, and make whatever answers we provide (directly or indirectly) good and responsive ones.

Keep in mind that we are not a help forum. We are not responsible for ensuring that anyone reaches a favorable conclusion to whatever situation prompts their question or search.

It seems to me that we should prioritize confirming it's an XY problem before we close the question, to prevent implicitly calling Y a good solution to problem X. But that's my question to you. Am I wrong about this?

In the interest of obtaining genuinely new, interesting, good questions, and because most of us like to be helpful, it can be worthwhile to attempt to sort out the X from an XY question and help the OP present that. However, I am not prepared to agree that we should prioritize that in an organized or general way.

Poor questions need to be closed or fixed, and it is inherent in our model that questions that start out poor but have potential are sometimes closed before they can be brought up to standard. This is especially true where substantial input from the OP is required to improve question, as is typically the case for an XY question. Moreover, we need to deal with a wide variety of issues, among them (I have seen all of these):

  • the OP abandons the question

  • the OP insists that he wants only the answer to the question he actually posed, notwithstanding community doubt as to the propriety of his approach (a common symptom of an XY question)

  • the OP understands the language / algorithm / problem too poorly to formulate or even recognize the question he really needs to ask

  • the OP asks a perfectly good question (regardless of whether it's a dupe), that nevertheless turns out to be an XY question.

We should not adopt new norms that interfere with closing bad questions under those or similar circumstances.

How can we best approach this when it happens?

  1. We remember our purpose and role here: first and foremost to write good answers to good questions. If a question is poor but you think it can be improved, including if you suspect it is an XY problem, try to help the OP fix it.

  2. We let our model work for us. A crowd-sourced model such as ours leverages both the volume and the diversity of the crowd. Don't be quick to lay down rules to homogenize us or our responses. Moreover, if you, personally, think a question as it is currently presented should be closed, then by all means vote to close, maybe even while you're trying to help fix it. That is not only a privilege but a responsibility of those so empowered.

  3. With respect to specific cases, use comments where warranted, even after a question is closed. You can express your concerns that way, and solicit a new question when you think that fixing the question would have been a better outcome than closing it. Vote to reopen (if you can do) where you think it warranted.

In comments you asked

Doesn't the XY problem almost always point towards OP not being aware of the difference between X and Y? If they were aware of the XY issue, it wouldn't be a problem in the question that is asked.

No, in my experience it is rarely the case that the OP asks about Y because they can't distinguish it from X. Usually, X is a more general problem, and Y is some particular, possibly misguided approach to X that the OP has conceived. Sometimes they are unaware that there are alternatives to Y. Where I suspect an XY question, my response is almost always to ask for context and for why the OP wants to do what they're asking about.

You also assert:

The XY problem inherently states that the poster's proposed solution (Y) is a bad one.

(Emphasis in the original.) No, that's just a common symptom, one of the few by which we have much hope of actually recognizing XY problems. If Y is (now) an all-around bad idea then it would be responsible of us to point that out. However, if there is a good former question on the same topic, with a good answer (making it a candidate dupe target), then it is unlikely that Y is all-around bad. The problem then is presumably that Y is not the best way to handle X, but if the OP does not present X in the first place then I don't see what the fuss is about.

Bottom line: I think what we're already doing adequately handles situations such as you are concerned about. There may occasionally be questions that end up handled differently than you think best, but that is inherent in the nature and dynamics of SO.

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