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Recently I received an answer from user and I accepted it because answered my question.

A few hours later, I received another, more complete answer that, like the previous answer, also answered my question.

So what I should do? Mark the second answer? Both resolve my problem, but in different ways.

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    The choice is entirely yours. Pick the answer that you feel deserves it most. Pick one because they helped you solve the problem best or because it is more complete or because you like their profile picture better, it is up to you. – Martijn Pieters May 15 '17 at 21:17
  • There is no real right or wrong here. The "tick" shows just what question helped you the most. We can't tell you which one it was. If the second answer also answers your question, but is more complete and you maybe learned some backround stuff, well, then you can say it helped you a bit more, but it is up to you which one you choose. But upvote both, if both are good answers (in your point of view). – Tom May 15 '17 at 21:19
  • @OldPadawan How is that relevant here? – Servy May 15 '17 at 21:21
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    You know what would be the best option? Don't accept any answers. Let the community decide which answer is better over time. The accept mark doesn't mean anything other than you decided to click the accept mark for that answer. – user4639281 May 15 '17 at 21:22
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    @TinyGiant I'd disagree on that. Not all useful answers attract upvotes over time. And even when they do, I still find knowing which answer solved the asker's problem very useful. – Nathan Arthur May 15 '17 at 22:20
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    @TinyGiant - Not accepting an answer implies that none of the given answers solved the exact problem the OP was having. I don't think that's helpful for future visitors or even the users who left answers who have to assume their solution was incomplete in some way. – BSMP May 15 '17 at 22:46
  • @NathanArthur Just because an OP used some code, doesn't mean it is in any way the best or even a good answer. I've seen many cases where the accepted answer contained blatant security vulnerabilities, or just generally horrible code. The OP is usually the least qualified to select the best answer. – user4639281 May 15 '17 at 22:55
  • @BSMP It implies nothing of the sort. What it implies is that the OP declined accepting an answer. Nothing about that implies that any given answer is incomplete or wrong. We can only accept one answer, and an answer being accepted does not imply that the rest of the answers are incorrect or incomplete in some way. It just implies that the OP decided to click a button. – user4639281 May 15 '17 at 22:56
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    @TinyGiant: "The accept mark doesn't mean anything other than you decided to click the accept mark for that answer." This is patently false. Questions that have an accepted answer are displayed in many UIs in a very different way from those which don't. By accepting an answer, you are visibly marking the question as "answered good enough for my sake". This is regardless of what the accepted answer's order is relative to others. – Nicol Bolas May 15 '17 at 23:34
  • @Nicol The fact that the Stack Overflow UI displays an accepted answer differently than a normal answer is irrelevant to the meaning that an accept mark carries. It could be construed to mean any number of things, but the only concrete meaning is that the asker decided to click a button. I have yet to see an answer that was accepted where the accept mark is the only signal of it being the best answer. I've seen many accepted answers that are absolute garbage being pinned to the top above comparably reasonable answers. – user4639281 May 15 '17 at 23:41
  • @TinyGiant: "I have yet to see an answer that was accepted where the accept mark is the only signal of it being the best answer." Really? You've never seen an answer be accepted despite being not as highly voted as another answer? Because I'm pretty sure I have. It tends to happen on questions where answers become outdated. The old answers still have their upvotes, but if the asker is still around, they can accept a more recent, superior answer. – Nicol Bolas May 16 '17 at 0:10
  • @TinyGiant: "It could be construed to mean any number of things, but the only concrete meaning is that the asker decided to click a button." And an upvote carries only the meaning that a user decided to click a button too. If you boil everything down to its constituent parts, you make everything meaningless. But that's not a useful perspective. The reality is that questions that have an accepted answer will accrue new answers at a slower rate than others. This is because people looking to answer questions are less willing to look at them. – Nicol Bolas May 16 '17 at 0:12
  • @Nicol You can get into psychoanalyzing the thought process of theoretical users as much as you want. Your comments are anecdotal at best. Accept marks, like upvotes and downvotes, mean nothing more than a user clicked a button. If you try to read into it any more than that, you're just guessing. How can you tell me that you know for a fact that the person who clicked the button did so because the answer worked the best for them, or even worked at all? Hell, maybe Tim dropped his keys again. – user4639281 May 16 '17 at 0:46
  • @Nicol The point being that if you look at any one vote in isolation, it is meaningless. There can only ever be one accept vote on a given question, so it can only ever be meaningless. – user4639281 May 16 '17 at 0:52
  • an answer being accepted does not imply that the rest of the answers are incorrect or incomplete in some way. I wasn't talking about the case where an answer is accepted, I was talking about the case where none of them are, which is what you suggested the OP do. – BSMP May 16 '17 at 1:14
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The accept mark basically endorses an answer as this was best for my circumstances which essentially means (one or more of):

  • Was very easy to use without changing a lot of code
  • Explained things to me in a way that was easiest of all to relate
  • Addresses some special caveats of the framework I mentioned I'm using, but wasn't causing the issue

.. and other stuff. If you really find one answer to be more compelling than the other, then just leave a comment indicating why and don't worry about it any more than that. It's enough for future passers-by to see, but quite honestly, anyone is going to quickly determine how much of the problem you describe is relevant to whatever led them to find your question in the first place, so you're really over-thinking it :)

Now, if there's a very subtle reason why you're accepting something that isn't immediately obvious (or explained well in the answer),consider leaving and accepting your own answer to explain this, linking to the answer that helped the most, add the additional explanation and context and make sure you leave enough info for future visitors to sort out what might be relevant to them should they find your question.

That's what it's really all about. Dragons be there? Let folks know if the other answers don't but led you to discover them.

In your case? Sounds like a comment is fine, or just accept the answer and get back to what you were doing :)

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