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So I ran into a question today where someone asked a broad question and so I linked them to MDN's documentation.

However, I also realized that StackOverflow's new Documentation feature probably had something similar and sure enough there was.

At this point I actually wasn't sure when I should be referring users to StackOverflow's documentation vs official documentation? My gut reaction is to to opt for official documentation but at the same time I think it might be beneficial to get new users to look at StackOverflow's documentation so they can contribute or at least validate if the documentation on StackOverflow's side makes sense and if not then possibly call it out.

Not sure if the community has an official stance on this?

closed as off-topic by Robert Columbia, klutt, il_raffa, Robert Longson, Stephen Kennedy Aug 27 '18 at 17:54

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  • "The problem described here can no longer be reproduced. Changes to the system or to the circumstances affecting the asker have rendered it obsolete. If you encounter a similar problem, please post a new question." – Robert Columbia, klutt, il_raffa, Robert Longson, Stephen Kennedy
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    I would redirect users based on the quality they might find when following the link. Some parts of SO Docs are OK-ish, some are not even close to useful. Maybe provide both, in order of usefulness? – rene May 1 '17 at 19:50
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    Actual docs. SO docs suck, and they're likely to vanish once the company finally realizes it should stop chucking its development time down the Docs hole. – user2357112 May 1 '17 at 20:04
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    There's no official stance, except that, if you're answering a question, you can get a badge for including a link to SO Docs. MDN has far, far better docs that what SO has for JS (and I contributed to the JS docs). – Heretic Monkey May 1 '17 at 20:04
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    The SO Docs themselves should point to official docs in their Introduction or Remarks section. However, folks will usually miss such links, since the design/layout does not highlight them meta.stackoverflow.com/q/343827 So I'd say: don't link SO Docs alone. – Frank May 1 '17 at 20:29
  • Why would anyone direct someone to Docs.SO? – user4639281 May 1 '17 at 20:35
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    @TinyGiant Because they care more about getting 15 rep than providing a better post (if in an answer). As far as comments, maybe they wrote the article? – Servy May 1 '17 at 20:37
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    get new users to look at StackOverflow's documentation so they can contribute or at least validate if the documentation on StackOverflow's side makes sense and if not then possibly call it out. As a new user, I would prefer you link me to a resource you expect I'll find useful, not rope me into an undisclosed user test. If I had to ask the question, I'm less likely then you to be able to tell good from bad, so I must trust in your judgement of what resources are worth learning from. – Jeffrey Bosboom May 1 '17 at 23:48
  • @JeffreyBosboom sorry if this came off the wrong way but to clarify no one really should link to documentation that is BAD and whether it be on SO or somewhere else. This is for the case where you have two good sources of information which should you opt for -- one that is community driven or official documentation (even if it might be unclear). – aug May 1 '17 at 23:53
  • Also I appreciate the comments and sorry if this comes off as a "dumb question" since it seems a lot of people are triggered by the documentation feature. Granted this probably could be considered related to Creating a topic which already has good official documentation in which case opt for the official. – aug May 1 '17 at 23:58
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For the moment, link to whichever documentation is most useful. In addition to official documentation and SO Documentation, feel free to link to other material such as tutorials, blog posts and examples. The important thing is to provide the best possible answer to useful questions.

In the long term, we hope people will find Stack Overflow Documentation useful enough to link to, but that really depends on users writing, editing and testing the content there. There's a bit of a chicken/egg problem: without people linking to topics, it's unlikely they will be refined to the point they are useful enough to link to.

If you find yourself wanting to repeat the same advice while answering many questions and the official documentation less useful than it could be on that point, there's really no downside to just writing a topic yourself. Even if Documentation fails the content won't be going anywhere. At the very least, we'll put it in a data dump. And if Documentation exceeds expectations, you will have created a valuable artifact for other people (and you yourself) to use answer broad questions.

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    "In the long term, we hope people will find Stack Overflow Documentation useful enough to link to" Here's a tip: Restart Docs' private beta, then go through all unaddressed Docs-related feature requests, then reopen Docs to the public with none of the crap it contains right now. – dorukayhan May 2 '17 at 0:18
  • @dorukayhan: I gotta say that's pretty disrespectful. Not to me, per se, but to all the people who gave their time and effort to populate Docs in the first place. If you look at, say, the C Topics you'll find a number of very useful examples contributed to by some really excellent developers. We certainly have some work to do to fix problems, but I'd say the problems have a lot less to do with the quality of existing content and a lot more to do with making that content useful for readers. – Jon Ericson May 2 '17 at 0:27

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