4

See this case (10k+):

The Q (mine) is clear, but I no longer need a full A - a one-line Comment solved my problem.

What is best practice?

A. DELETE the question?

B. (if not delete) To explain/reinforce that it has been resolved by comment, the author should:

  1. Edit the question (as I do in the example) to say "was trivial and solved by this comment"?

  2. Post an answer to reinforce the commented solution?

  3. Do nothing?

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  • 2
    More often than not, a question that can trivially answered in comment could be liable of being closed for being a typo (non-reproducible), not having done enough research (e.g. missing a [mcve]), marked as a duplicate of some other question, being it canonical or not. – yivi Apr 27 '17 at 10:48
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    Answer your question! Such questions are useful since some rather inexperienced user might get the very same error, too and lands here by googeling for the error message. – false Apr 27 '17 at 10:53
  • Questions like this tend to get a lot of votes on SO. And technically involved ones don't. Pareto's Principle demands that most programmers get stuck on simple problems. The question title is important, having the error message in the title is good SEO. Being a bit ashamed for it is quite normal :) It is entirely your call, if you keep it then post the solution and mark it as the answer yourself. – Hans Passant Apr 27 '17 at 12:08
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    I would add a comment to invit the commenter to post his suggestion as an answer. If he does not answer, do it yourself, saying you post his comment as an answer. – Mistalis Apr 27 '17 at 13:22
  • In this case, the question could (should) be marked as a duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/338768/… – Cerbrus Feb 28 '19 at 10:44
  • Note that searching for ImportError: No module named returns over 17.000 questions, most of which are answered by install the module plus perhaps instructions on how to do that. Perhaps there's room for a canonical and you could mark yours as a duplicate of it, perhaps this is too simple for that. – Erik A Feb 28 '19 at 10:54
  • @Cerbrus That's a question about a rather specific issue about __init__.py being renamed. There are others that probably would fit as a duplicate, though. – Erik A Feb 28 '19 at 10:56
  • @ErikA: One of the answers does answer the OP's question though. But I agree there's probably a better one out there. – Cerbrus Feb 28 '19 at 10:57
5

Often, trivial questions like that have been asked (and answered) on SO already.

The best course of action would be to try and find a duplicate target, and close the question as a duplicate.

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3

Questions should always have answers, or remain open for someone to answer if the problem is unresolved.

Use your professional expertise to decide if others would benefit from the answer or not. If the information in the comments is useful for others convert the comments to an answer; you can answer your own questions.

If others would not benefit then it depends if it is your own question or someone elses. For your own, delete it, but this has risks if you accumulate too many deleted questions (they can cause a ban). If it is someone else's question vote to close the question using the Off Topic reason:

This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting.

Never edit "Solved" or an answer into the question.

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  • Deletion itself contributes little if at all to the question ban. It's just that deletion does not remove the effect of the downvotes the question had gathered in the meantime – John Dvorak Apr 27 '17 at 14:00
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    "Questions should always have answers" No. Not all questions that are posted to SO should be answered. A lot of them should be closed and / or deleted. – Cerbrus Feb 28 '19 at 10:39

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