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I've noticed that Stack Overflow allows users to answer their own questions, not just once, but as many times as they want. It even gives them a warning mentioning they should update an existing answer instead of creating a new one. Why should users be allowed to answer the same question multiple times and not be forced to update their existing answer?

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    Yes, it is an explicit feature. Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 14:55
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    Could you explain the reason? It's an honest question, I'm just trying to understand.
    – Rafael
    Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 14:56
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    Because sometimes a question has more than one solution, and each deserves to be voted on separately. Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 14:56
  • Sometimes it's better to provide different solutions. That then allows for each solution to be viewed upon separately. It can be difficult to vote on a answer that has 3 solutions jumbled into it. The answer also can become unclear.
    – Bugs
    Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 14:56
  • But from the same person, couldn't that person just update their own answer instead of creating a whole new answer?
    – Rafael
    Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 14:57
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    @SvenLion could you explain why users should not be able to present altenative answers to a question? Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 14:57
  • You guys are missing the point, I'm asking if the SAME user should be able to post multiple answers to a question. Instead of just updating his first answer.
    – Rafael
    Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 14:57
  • @SvenLion Everybody got the point. It does not matter if it is the same user, so long as the answers show substantially different solutions.
    – Louis
    Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 14:58
  • No @SvenLion you're missing the point. It's for if the same user has different solutions.
    – Bugs
    Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 14:58
  • If there's only one answer with two solutions the community can only vote on them as a whole. Perhaps one has significant downsides that are not disclosed but the other does not. Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 14:58
  • @SvenLion: no, we are not missing the point. Multiple solutions that the same user posted can still be voted on separately. Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 14:58
  • @Bugs Then why wouldn't he just update the answer and include the solution there?
    – Rafael
    Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 14:58
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    @SvenLion: because then you can't vote independently for those solutions. Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 14:59
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    Because a) the answer will become messy to include all solutions and b) each solution would be difficult to critique separately.
    – Bugs
    Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 15:00
  • Alright, I understand why. Thanks for explaining it.
    – Rafael
    Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 15:02

1 Answer 1

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It's not unreasonable for someone to answer a question, and then later think of a completely different way to answer it, whether it's their own question or someone else's. If other people have already interacted with the first answer, commented and voted on it, etc., then editing it into something considerably different would invalidate all of that.

I wouldn't want to upvote something and then have the user change it into something I don't agree with (or vice versa). I'd rather have them add the new idea as a different answer. I don't care whether it's the same user or not. That's irrelevant.

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  • Very occasionally, there is also an answerer-bound motivation for doing that. It might happen that you have two solutions that use very different approaches to a problem, and glomming them both into a single answer would result in an overlong mess.
    – duplode
    Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 15:04
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    @duplode That's true. I think initially that decision is up to the answerer. If they already know of more than one solution at the time they answer, they can combine them into one answer in spite of the potential overlong mess, or go ahead and create two separate answers from the beginning. But in my opinion, coming back later to inject another answer into an existing answer that other people have already evaluated doesn't seem appropriate. Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 15:22

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