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I've recently read this question explaining how to dissociate a question from an account.

I was wondering, what happened to the reputation gained or lost with this question? The logic would be that it should be removed, but I would like confirmation.

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  • I think you linked to the wrong question. You probably meant this one. Apr 26, 2017 at 12:31
  • @DonaldDuck Yes, you are absolutely right. I don't know why I linked the wrong one (and I do not know how you recovered the right one), but well done, Mr Duck!
    – Mistalis
    Apr 26, 2017 at 12:39
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    If you want to know how I recovered the right one, there was a link to it in one of the comments on the question that you linked to first. Apr 26, 2017 at 12:44

1 Answer 1

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All reputation events and badges for the post are removed too.

It'll be as if you never created the post in the first place, so you never received the votes or badges for it either.

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  • 4
    @Mistalis I find it easier to think of it as "the post from the user's point of view was never made in the first place"
    – Jon Clements Mod
    Apr 24, 2017 at 12:23
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    @JonClements so the > 60 days +3 score, keep your reputation when a post is deleted rule does not apply here? Apr 24, 2017 at 12:30
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    @RobertLongson: it doesn't. It's as if the post was never made.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    Apr 24, 2017 at 12:33
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    @RobertLongson: we sometimes use post disassociation to remove a plagiarised post from someone's history, when we feel they have gained a disproportionate amount of reputation from a post they didn't write.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    Apr 24, 2017 at 12:36
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    However, if the user has received a badge because of this post, they won't lose it. Only tag badges can be lost
    – Zanon
    Apr 24, 2017 at 17:12
  • @Zanon AFAIK, even the badges are removed. Apr 24, 2017 at 17:46
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    @BhargavRao, you keep them, unless the user received them by cheating. If the user ask to be dissociated (instead of being forced to dissociated), it may keep the badges.
    – Zanon
    Apr 24, 2017 at 18:27
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    Interesting. Thanks for that @Zanon. That is new to me. I've only seen the cheating part of post dissociation, where the users have lost the badges (blame the mod duties). Apr 24, 2017 at 18:30
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    So when someone is voluntarily dissociated, then he is not really dissociated, because one can still see the linkage between the user and the post via the badges?
    – Marco13
    Apr 26, 2017 at 9:48
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    @Marco13 that's an interesting observation that deserves a new meta post. Maybe it's a security issue (confidentiality) that was not considered before or just something that could be clarified in the FAQ that I've linked.
    – Zanon
    Apr 26, 2017 at 10:04
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    @Zanon Maybe it's already answered somewhere (or one of the mods knows the answer). If not, it could indeed be raised as a potential issue.
    – Marco13
    Apr 26, 2017 at 10:21
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    @Marco13: I checked on a recent case, and the badges were removed when the post was disassociated. There is no public trace left that the post was ever associated with the account.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    Apr 26, 2017 at 11:05
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    @Zanon: no, in the cases of disassociation that I've been involved with, the badges were removed. Looks like the FAQ is not complete on that point.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    Apr 26, 2017 at 11:54
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    @BhargavRao, just a follow up: as Martijn checked, I was wrong. Even if the user hasn't cheated, badges are removed on disassociation.
    – Zanon
    Apr 26, 2017 at 12:00
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    @Zanon: most cases of disassociation don't involve badges anyway (people want to get rid of embarrassing posts, not posts that did well). I did more digging and eventually found a voluntary disassociation request, no cheating involved, where the post should have earned them numerous badges, and none of those badges were present anymore on the account. Ergo, the badges were auto-removed as part of the disassociation process.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    Apr 26, 2017 at 12:03

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