36

I'm not savvy enough to answer the most difficult questions, and the ones I could answer are almost always answered by the time I see them. As a result most of my rep points come from questions I've made, rather than from answers I've given (i.e., I'm a leech).

I'd like to know what is the distribution of this ratio across SO. The formula would be:

aq_ratio = (rep from answers given) / (rep from questions made)

My guess is that a small number of very active users will be grouped with large values of aq_ratio, and the rest of us will be distributed below.

Is there a way to obtain these values?


This is what I get using the query created by Martin Smith. I only used aq_ratio>0 values for clarity.

enter image description here

Another way to look at the data

enter image description here

  • 2
    data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/query/new You need the Posts and Votes tables. – Martin Smith Apr 22 '17 at 20:47
  • Thank you @MartinSmith. I found a related answer here with a functional SEDE query meta.stackoverflow.com/a/307910/1391441, but that works for one user at a time. Is there a way to query the entire SO database? – Gabriel Apr 22 '17 at 20:52
  • Yes. data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/query/661741/…. That ignores rep cap, bounties, community wiki and probably other things. – Martin Smith Apr 22 '17 at 21:46
  • Mind that even if some people are faster at typing their answer, the faster they type the lower quality the answer. So you may still write a better answer, which might then also be accepted. I'm also not sure about the significance of this aq_ratio, as it will give a ratio of 1 for people who have just answered and asked a single question, as well as for people who have asked and answered 500 questions. – ImportanceOfBeingErnest Apr 23 '17 at 0:11
  • I think you misunderstood the aq_ratio, it's not the ratio of the number of answers/questions, it's the ratio of the reputation gained with each. – Gabriel Apr 23 '17 at 0:16
  • That is clear. This is only a rough estimate assuming twice as many upvotes on questions than on answers. But if you wish I formulate it more precisely: aq_ratio will give a ratio of 1 for people who have just answered one question with 1 upvote and asked a single question with 2 upvotes, as well as for people who have asked 500 questions with a mean upvote rate of 2 and answered 500 questions with an upvote rate of 1. (Those rates are not too far off, e.g. I have 9 questions asked, 18 upvotes (= rate 2), and 897 upvotes on 1050 answers. (~ rate 1)) – ImportanceOfBeingErnest Apr 23 '17 at 0:32
  • Yes, that seems correct. The idea is to see how much a user has "taken"/"given" to the site no matter how many questions/answers they've made. – Gabriel Apr 23 '17 at 0:47
  • 3
    A good question that is highly upvoted gives a lot to the site, while many poor questions with even less than a single upvote are poisoneous for the site. Still, this ratio would be higher, the lower quality the questions. So as a user with many low quality questions I would "give" a lot to the site? – ImportanceOfBeingErnest Apr 23 '17 at 0:52
  • 4
    Most users tend to be only interested in the rep they can earn in the first, oh, week after they posted. Pretty big difference with the kind of post that has been around for years and does not completely disappear from Google hits. Rep does take the long view, I'd say it about doubles over time on average. Big outliers when Google picks the question you answered as the top hit, a quarter of a million views is not unusual then. Googlers vote about once for every 100 views on a very popular answer. – Hans Passant Apr 23 '17 at 10:10
  • Hm, I am also typically late but since I rarely ask questions (and most of the time they are unanswered) still most remcomes from answers and comments. (And I really wish people would more upvote partial answers if their questions are hard to answer completely) – eckes Apr 24 '17 at 2:31
  • Is the y-axis of the second graph correct? It's labelled as a percentage, but it looks to me like it should be multiplied by 100 to make it a percentage. – Andy Nichols Apr 24 '17 at 15:25
  • 1
    @AndyNichols yes, it's a percentage divided by 100 :) – Gabriel Apr 24 '17 at 15:26
  • 1
    I have not asked any questions, only answered some. In my particular case you will get a division by zero error if you stick with this formula. And there are a few others like me, particularly among the top answerers. – Shadow Apr 25 '17 at 16:04
  • @Shadow you are the outliers :) This was just a query for fun using a very simple formula. I accept corrections. – Gabriel Apr 25 '17 at 17:01
  • But when you perform an analysis, the outliers are particularly interesting because they are the ones that do not fit into the pattern. – Shadow Apr 25 '17 at 18:03
8

I think this query does what you want:

select sum(case when p.posttypeid = 1 -- Q
           then case when v.votetypeid = 2 then 5  -- up
                     when v.votetypeid = 3 then -2 -- down
                end
           else 0
           end
      ) as qrep,
      sum(case when p.posttypeid = 2 -- A
           then case when v.votetypeid = 2 then 10 -- up 
                     when v.votetypeid = 3 then -2 --down
                end
           else 0
           end
      ) as arep ,
      sum(case when p.posttypeid = 2 -- A
           then case when v.votetypeid = 2 then 10 -- up 
                     when v.votetypeid = 3 then -2 --down
                end
           else 0
           end
      )  /
      sum(case when p.posttypeid = 1 -- Q
           then case when v.votetypeid = 2 then 5  -- up
                     when v.votetypeid = 3 then -2 -- down
                end
           else 0
           end
      )  as ratio    
from posts p
inner join votes v on v.postid = p.id

when run today the result is:

  qrep    |   arep    |  ratio
----------+-----------+----------
136044770 | 569756250 |    4
  • I got a ratio of 5 with my query, that includes the +15 for accepted answers. – Martin Smith Apr 22 '17 at 22:27
  • Thank you rene and Martin, both queries work great. But I was wondering about the distribution of values for all SO users, not just the overall ratio for the entire database. Sorry if I wasn't clear. – Gabriel Apr 22 '17 at 22:47
  • 2
    @Gabriel so something like this then. Though you will probably want to bucketize the outliers data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/query/661746/… – Martin Smith Apr 22 '17 at 22:57
  • That looks great! What is the meaning of users with negative ratios? – Gabriel Apr 22 '17 at 23:00
  • 1
    @gabriel it is certainly possible that someone can have a negative rep from either questions or answers so dividing one by the other per your formula gives a negative number. I'll leave it to you to fix. Probably you want the denominator to be sum of Q and A. – Martin Smith Apr 22 '17 at 23:10
  • 1
    @MartinSmith Don't forget that askers get +2 for accepting an answer. It looks like that is still missing? – Jorn Vernee Apr 24 '17 at 12:26
  • 3
    @JornVernee - yep as are rep cap, bounties, community wiki, rep floor and maybe other things. It is Gabriel that is interested in these statistics not me. I won't be spending any more time on this. – Martin Smith Apr 24 '17 at 14:48
  • @JornVernee Askers only get +2 for accepting an answer the first time, no? – TylerH Apr 26 '17 at 14:49
  • @TylerH I have gotten it multiple times on a different stackexchange site. Maybe SO is different though, I've only asked 1 Q here. – Jorn Vernee Apr 26 '17 at 16:49
  • @JornVernee Hmm, I suppose I just ask infrequently enough that I forget each time, or I don't notice the +2 among the other reputation notifications. – TylerH Apr 26 '17 at 17:31

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