6

I'm talking specifically about this answer and this comment. The answer works great, but that comment explains in one sentence why the answer works. I think it enriches the answer and should be added to it, but the comment's author might disagree (after all, he could have added this to the answer himself), or the answer's author (he could have also edited his own answer).

Should I just edit the answer to add this information, giving credit to the commenter?

  • 3
    If the comment was also from the same user who posted the answer this would be fine but you shouldn't add someone else's content to an answer. That's implying that the user who answered agreed with that content and that's not necessarily the case. – BSMP Apr 21 '17 at 20:00
  • This is exactly one of the reasons why I thought I should ask. Do you suggest an alternative course of action? Perhaps a way to further highlight this comment (I've already upvoted it) without implying the user who answered agreed to this information? – Blueriver Apr 21 '17 at 20:31
  • If the user who posted the answer declines to add the comment to their answer, perhaps the user who left the comment could be persuaded to create their own answer? (They might not if it would largely be the same.) But up-voting it does help keep it visible. – BSMP Apr 22 '17 at 1:48
  • Yes, answer should be updated so that people in search of the answer of same question could get benefited. – Zobia Kanwal Feb 5 at 17:46
2

In general

If it will improve the answer or correct errors in the answer, it's worth a try. The way this site works is that all posts are owned by the community, and we generally welcome edits that improve answers.

However, be careful. Don't deviate from the original intent: don't add something that contradicts what they were originally saying. If you're editing the answer based on a comment from someone other than the author, be especially careful that you're not using this to try to push a different solution or a different opinion or a different agenda. It's one thing to fix a spelling error, correct a minor mistake, or add explanation that explains why the answer works; it's another to change the sense of the answer. The latter type of edits are usually not desirable and are likely to be rejected.

If you are adding material based on a comment by the same user who wrote the answer, I suggest that you mention this fact in the review comments, as otherwise reviewers might be unaware of that fact and might reject the edit. In practice reviewers don't always know how to handle edits that introduce substantive changes, and sometimes will reject changes that appear to "put words into" the poster's mouth.

In your specific case

I would not recommend making such an edit. The comment appears to deviate a bit too far from what the author had in mind. The original author wrote "I think this is the most annoying little peculiarity of HTML" and the comment said "it's not a peculiarity". So, this seems on particularly dubious grounds, to me. If you feel strongly, you can write your own answer, and make it complete and stand on its own.

-4

I wouldn't make edits that drastically change the answer, even if they're only adding explanation and not changing OP's intention. Alternatively, you can ask OP to add an explanation as part of their answer.

Also please note that sometimes comments can be considered as part of the answer, people who are seeking explanation on why the answer works (or not), might find the details on comments.

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    @yellowantphil So is the answer. Important comments are less likely to be deleted, and while they are there, they can be part of the answer. – Maroun Apr 21 '17 at 19:29
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    @MarounMaroun Isn't that explicitly contradictory to meta.stackexchange.com/questions/19756/how-do-comments-work? Particularly the section on comment deletion? – bitnine Apr 21 '17 at 20:07
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    I understand your reasoning. However, I don't see this as being an edit that "drastically" changes the answer. Do you see this change as drastic, and if so why? – Blueriver Apr 21 '17 at 20:29

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