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Acceptance of answers and votes serve as a form of peer-review on SO. You could expect incorrect answers to receive downvotes and sink to the bottom, while answers that prove useful should gather upvotes over time, further confirming their reliability. Unfortunately, not every question has an answer that is easily verifiable. A coding question with an exact, precise answer can be tried and verified to be correct or not, but for knowledge questions this may be a bit trickier.

Unfortunately, having the answer accepted is no guarantee that it is correct, since the person asking is by definition in a bad position to judge this. In this case the vote count is more important, but some questions simply don't attract much attention so the answers don't pass as much scrutiny as you'd like.

If you feel capable of supplying an answer but don't feel entirely confident in whether it's correct, should you refrain from answering, or try anyway and rely on the community to pass judgement on it?

I've started asking myself this question after providing this answer on a question that didn't attract much attention otherwise, but seemed valid. I didn't pull something out of my rear end and did the necessary research, but my days as an IT student are far behind me and I've lost some IQ points since then as a result of coding Java and doing enterprise projects. So I'm not entirely confident in my theoretical basis.

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    "I've lost some IQ points since then as a result of coding Java and doing enterprise projects" I'm sorry to hear that. – BoltClock Apr 21 '17 at 10:49
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    @BoltClock I'm staving off dementia by dabbling in some Lisp now and then and reading Paul Graham. – G_H Apr 21 '17 at 11:04
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    Think of it this way: a. you have some useful information to contribute. b. that information answers the question. -> it doesn't belong in a comment, but in an answer. It could help to state that you're not entirely sure, but tbh, unless there are specific sources quoted, any answer could be taken as someone's best guess/effort. – Jorn Vernee Apr 21 '17 at 11:21
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    @BoltClock The IQ gain or loss is always accompanied by a non-zero increase in eccentricity. Doesn't matter if the code made you smarter or dumber, eventually one day you'll go bat shit crazy. – Draco18s Apr 21 '17 at 13:53
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    The accepted answer checkmark is not intended an indication of quality, but of whether it solved the OP's problem. So you should not use checkmarks to determine the quality of an answer at all, only in concert with a comparison of the question to your question to see if it might solve your problem, too. – TylerH Apr 21 '17 at 20:01
  • Or, you know, post an answer only when you have verified it solves the issue. – Braiam Apr 22 '17 at 16:52
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    @Braiam As stated in the question: "Unfortunately, not every question has an answer that is easily verifiable." This concerned a question of a theoretical nature. I can't run some program to verify that I'm correct, only try to check if there's flaws in my logic. – G_H Apr 23 '17 at 12:37
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Should I rely on votes and acceptance to verify my answer if I'm not entirely sure of it?

Sure, that's exactly what you should do. An important foundational principle of Stack Overflow is that our answers are peer-reviewed by fellow experts. If your answer is incorrect, you can be certain that someone (probably multiple someones) will call you out on it. They may do so by any number of means, including: posting an alternative answer, downvoting your answer, leaving a comment on your answer, and/or editing your answer to fix an obvious typo or simple misstatement.

Now, to be clear, you shouldn't just pull things out of your rear end and post them as answers, but you said you didn't do that here, so nothing more needs to be said about that. If you have some reason to believe that you are correct, and have something to contribute, then you shouldn't feel ashamed about contributing.

Maybe it happens that you are wrong. As a good citizen, you should be prepared for that eventuality. There are different ways of dealing with it. You can choose to edit your answer and correct it, or if your answer is just too far gone (and especially if someone else has already posted a good answer), you can just delete it. No harm, no foul. No one knows everything; the important thing is to learn.

Unfortunately, having the answer accepted is no guarantee that it is correct, since the person asking is by definition in a bad position to judge this. In this case the vote count is more important, but some questions simply don't attract much attention so the answers don't pass as much scrutiny as you'd like.

Yes. This is correct on all counts. Not much we can do about any of it, though. It may be, especially on low-participation tags, that a couple of years later, someone comes along and peer-reviews your answer. Not all good things happen quickly.

So I'm not entirely confident in my theoretical basis.

Since others reading your answer might also be on shaky theoretical ground, you might want to put a weasel phrase or two in your answer. Peer review is great, but experts aren't the only people reading the answers here. We get a lot of views by people who have no idea what the answer is, and they might blindly trust you when they shouldn't. It's perfectly okay to say something like, "Although it's been a while since I wrote any Java code, I believe you would do this by…", or "If I recall my theoretical computer science courses correctly, the algorithm is…".

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    In b4 "weasel phrases are noise and don't belong in an answer" – BoltClock Apr 21 '17 at 11:07
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    An expert that is completely confident of an answer's veracity would be well within their rights to edit out such weasel phrases. I've done this once or twice myself. But they're not noise unless it can be proven that they're noise. – Cody Gray Apr 21 '17 at 11:08
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    Excellent points. There's some "caveat lector" in the comments, which also contribute a bit of meta to the answer, which is why I've left them there for now instead of moving to chat (the comment thread should be done and over with now anyway). I also suppose that a question/answer that doesn't get much traffic by definition can't do much harm if there's bad info. I've had the occasional downvoted answer, which often taught me as much as a good one because it corrected my misunderstandings. – G_H Apr 21 '17 at 11:11
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Should I rely on votes and acceptance to verify my answer if I'm not entirely sure of it?

No. Upvotes and acceptance does not mean that an answer is correct or complete. It merely means that the people who have read the question and your answer have decided to either upvote the answer and/or accepted the posting as an answer.

While everyone hopes that upvotes and answer acceptance means a posting is correct and valid, these are both proxies or indicators as to the posting's reliability and validity as an answer rather than an absolute, direct measure.

If someone accepts a particular posting as the answer to the question then we would hope that the answer actually worked when used or the answer agreed with additional information from other sources or the answer quoted authoritative sources which are generally accepted as correct, reliable, and valid.

Questions have different characteristics with some being specific and technical while others are more general and abstract. The result is that answers may be concrete and binary, either right or wrong, or they may be fuzzy and gray, either more right or more wrong. The question itself may be poorly written requiring a guess or two as to the question's intent.

And people who up vote or down vote a posting may be suffering from Dunning - Kruger Effect and may know even less about the subject than you.

Answers should include some indication as to how confident the person posting is of what they are writing. The content of a posting should indicate whether material is a Fact, an Opinion, or a Guess.

One thing that I do is when I see reputation changes or a comment is to see what answer or question was up voted or down voted and take another look at that material. I have found that sometimes an update or additional material to what I posted improves the posting.

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    This contrasts the answer by Cody Gray, but I find you raise valid points as well. However, what does it mean practically? If we can't assume that over time votes will be indicative of the quality of an answer, should we refrain from answering if we feel any uncertainty? I feel it's a bit like the scientific principle, where nothing can really be stated with absolute certainty but reproducible results and lack of contradictions make something accepted as "truth". – G_H Apr 21 '17 at 12:19
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    @G_H assuming that votes over time indicates the quality of an answer depends on(1) people finding and reading the question and answer, (2) people having some expertise or knowledge of the subject, and (3) people actually voting or leaving a comment. Science faces the same problem of validation of results and reproducibility of results. Generating new results is sexier than replication of previous results slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2016/04/… – Richard Chambers Apr 21 '17 at 12:48
  • Hmm, now it feels as if accepting an answer here would be a thoroughly subjective affair. – G_H Apr 21 '17 at 12:51
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    @G_H there are some things that can be asserted with absolute certainty. And votes do provide an indication of usefulness of an answer, how well it helps other people who use that material. Notice that I said usefulness of an answer which may not mean the answer has great quality. The level of quality of an answer depends on the technical correctness and also in how understandable the answer is, the presentation of the technical material. An answer may be correct yet due to the way it is written, the technical content is poorly or completely inaccessible depending on the reader's expertise. – Richard Chambers Apr 21 '17 at 12:55
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    I often go more on the comments under an answer than the upvotes. If 5 people have posted "worked for me, thanks" then their motivation for upvoting is clear, so I'm more likely to trust the answer. Yes, I know this goes against SO philosophy because comments are ephemeral...but sometimes theory clashes with practice. – S List Apr 23 '17 at 7:20

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