22

I came across this review, which would harm a post with very evil intention*.

I have rejected it as causes harm:

Clearly has the intention of destroying the database table of a potential help-seeking person.

Is that all I need to do? Does a Moderator will get some kind of custom flag for it? I feel like a moderator should have a talk to this person.

What is the correct course of action in such a case?

* Actually it turned out, I misunderstood this specific case. Anyway, this question is for the general course of action.

2
  • 5
    I remember once stating somewhere that the "causes harm" label needlessly implies malice or an otherwise serious problem and ought to be changed...
    – BoltClock Mod
    Apr 20 '17 at 4:54
  • 12
    Other than being a bad answer in general, I guess I am not sure what the issue is. People commonly drop a temporary db table when they are done with it as part of cleanup. What makes you so sure his intentions were harm and not following good practices? Apr 20 '17 at 14:13
7

It looked to me more like the intent was to comment on the post rather than address anything wrong with it, so "This is a comment" or analogous would've been fine.

If a moderator needs to get involved, you can find one of the user's posts and ♦ flag it. But the only time a moderator really needs to get involved is if the content is genuinely offensive or genuinely against the ToS. Flagging an approved review which was clearly inappropriate is also a good thing to do, as well. Just know that most of the reviewing belongs to us, and since we're more subject matter experts than the moderators, know that they should really be intervening when truly bad edits get approved.

9
  • 2
    The question was about how to select something in sql. The edit to the answer was DROP TABLE. Are you sure about it? However: What about if an edit would be in evil intention? Apr 20 '17 at 3:24
  • 28
    The table in question is a temporary table, created in T-SQL. That does make the answer almost inappropriate since the question is based in Oracle, but dropping the temp table isn't the worst thing one can do. It's still a comment on the answer, though.
    – Makoto
    Apr 20 '17 at 3:29
  • 1
    oops agree, my bad. But out of curiosity, I am still wondering what would be the correct course of action, if an edit is harmfull. Apr 20 '17 at 3:33
  • It's case-by-case, honestly. Rejecting it is probably the best; leaving a custom remark only really gives context to the editor as to why it was rejected on a more personable level.
    – Makoto
    Apr 20 '17 at 3:35
  • So no moderator would see it? The correct action would to find a post of that user, and moderator flag it, if it needs moderator attention? Apr 20 '17 at 3:37
  • 1
    If a moderator needs to get involved, sure. The only time a moderator really needs to get involved is if the content is genuinely offensive or genuinely against the ToS. Flagging an approved review which was clearly inappropriate is also a good thing to do, as well. Just know that most of the review belongs to us, and since we're more subject matter expert than the moderators, know that they should really be intervening when truly bad edits get approved.
    – Makoto
    Apr 20 '17 at 3:38
  • 2
    Thank you =) Maybe you could edit your last comment into your answer. Apr 20 '17 at 3:40
  • It may also be a good idea to flag for diamond mod attention if you find an obvious case of robo-reviewing. As in, a user with ridiculously high accept/reject ration, who constantly approves crap, yet somehow has managed to dodge the automatic review ban.
    – Lundin
    Apr 21 '17 at 9:47
  • @Makoto The code in the question is a table variable not a temporary table. The edit would try and drop a non existent temporary table and so cause an error. But still no massive harm done. Apr 22 '17 at 15:36
3

I don't think this was intended to be malicious; they were intending to help clean temporary tables after being used (a good practice).

The only thing that they have got wrong is that they are trying to delete it from the tempdb and not from memory; it should be:

DROP TABLE @DtTbl

not

DROP TABLE #DtTbl

Edit: As suggested within comments, DROP TABLE it is not possible to drop a temporary table variable, and therefore should not be present. It also DOES get stored in the tempdb. Good job this question was a meta :)

2
  • It is not possible to drop a table variable. They are cleaned up automatically when the variable goes out of scope. Also the tempdb vs in memory thing is a myth Apr 22 '17 at 15:36
  • @MartinSmith Oh Yes, so it does.. Thanks for debusting that myth ;)
    – Radderz
    Apr 24 '17 at 8:43

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .