43

I recently came across this self answer on SO.

I solved my own question and not for the first time in my existence but with a nudge from some of you guys including MetaColon above. Thanks for the pointer MetaColon but I am the master once again. The truly correct answer which should be shared for the help and benefit of the ignorant population is as follows

Looking back through previous questions, you can see a similar theme on answers. e.g. this

Here is the correct answer to my question from the young middle aged loving master himself for the benefit of everyone angels and devils alike.

and this.

I guess I will have to also answer my own question for the benefit of everyone reading this question as not everyone knows what is inside your mind except you nor does anyone know the real motives of a novice when asking a question.

You can also see similar in the questions. e.g. this

Being a total newby, I felt like a virgin who had just lost his virginity after writing my first ever web service to do this in MS Visual Studio 2012 using an Ajax Web Service Project.

and (to a lesser extent) this

My favourite answer is this one and it worked

In cases like these, should we be attempting to edit out any portions of the answer that contain this type superfluous flavour text?

  • 9
    Hmm, what is so bad about it, except that it doesn't fit in a tweet? – rene Apr 17 '17 at 15:13
  • 2
    @rene it's not necessarily bad, but it can detract from a post (in my opinion). Some people may see it and immediately ignore the post, even if the remainder contains relevant information. I suppose the root of the question is, whether it conflicts with the image we want SO to present, or whether its incidental and should be ignored – Obsidian Phoenix Apr 17 '17 at 15:17
  • 1
    @rene You should read the posts in full to get the real "flavour"... Most of the content of his posts are this drivel. – Heretic Monkey Apr 17 '17 at 15:19
  • 17
    @ObsidianPhoenix Something that detracts from posts is necessarily bad. – Servy Apr 17 '17 at 15:21
  • @Servy I'd tend to agree, but I didn't want to be the judge on that one (hence the question) – Obsidian Phoenix Apr 17 '17 at 15:22
  • 2
    @MikeMcCaughan Ok, I understand we are the style police as well. I keep that mind. – rene Apr 17 '17 at 15:38
  • 3
    While editing out the noise you should also format their error messages and add some white space to the posts that are one huge paragraph. – BSMP Apr 17 '17 at 15:51
  • 10
    @rene - The user in question spends way too much time whining about having to answer their own questions, going "haha, I'm the winner" at someone who did post an answer when they opted to post their own is childish, calling everyone else "ignorant" probably didn't help them any, no one wants to know what someone's first time was like, and "this is my favorite answer" is redundant because accepted answers are marked. – BSMP Apr 17 '17 at 20:06
  • 6
    DON'T GO AROUND FOLLOWING ONE USER. If you happen to see a post with fluff, edit it. But DON'T follow that user around. – Fattie Apr 18 '17 at 21:23
  • 5
    @Fattie Not always true. If the problem is persistent with a single user, there isn't really any other option. Take for example a user adding in hidden requests for money in all of their posts. One can't just let that go and ignore all the other problems, and hope to stumble upon another post by that user. – Daedalus Apr 19 '17 at 0:02
  • 2
    Every time you edit someone's post, you are saying "I know how to write better than you do", and it's very likely someone is going to feel hurt. Sometimes, if it happens too often, they will feel sufficiently hurt that they won't come back. Only do it if it's really necessary, not just because you prefer your writing style to theirs. – Michael Kay Apr 19 '17 at 15:40
  • Note also that this user is fully capable of rolling back any edit you make to his answers. Since he seems to have a pattern of such bluster, I'm inclined to guess that that's exactly what he would do. That doesn't necessarily mean that you shouldn't try -- maybe he'll get the idea -- but it's not worth getting into an edit war over. Ultimately, this member is making his own reputation, and he's going to have to live with it. – John Bollinger Apr 19 '17 at 16:21
  • This is why people don't like StackOverflow... – Cypher Apr 20 '17 at 6:07
  • 2
    "This" being a bunch of self-aggrandizing rhetoric and clashes of egos, @clive? Yes, I'd say this kind of thing is the very worst of Stack Overflow. This website is supposed to be about two things: questions and answers. It is nigh-irrelevant who contributed the answer, what your age is, and whether you're an angel or a devil. – Cody Gray Apr 20 '17 at 7:01
  • Well, since the person, when told people are commenting on their style, immediately references Nazi Germany and says people should not be "offended so easily" and doesn't care, I don't think they will get the idea after the edits. I personally think this style should not be encouraged, for two reasons: it makes SO look bad when someone stumbles across this kind of text and it makes the person themself look bad. Even if they don't realize it. Nobody wants to be around a know-it-all wise-ass. I know. – Sami Kuhmonen Apr 20 '17 at 7:17
85

When a user, attempting to find their place as an upstanding member of this community, to contribute toward the noble goal of lovingly curating this vast and varied repository of knowledge we all hold so dear, which has aided us in our times of need, and which we endeavor to support so that it continues in this capacity as an invaluable resource to countless developers, working on solving any number of different problems of various levels of importance to the world in general, but each one personally valuable to its specific developer, in that we all take pride in our work, and feel the satisfaction that comes with not only achieving our goals, but truly understanding how the things that we have created work, encounters a question or an answer which contains some nugget of useful information, some shining insight which guides them to better understanding, but which may be obscured by an excess of additional verbiage, the user must attempt in good faith to apply their efforts to grasp the true intention of the writer, and to maintain that intention as they attempt to improve the question or answer, and in doing so the question of style often arises, and this prospective editor is confronted with the possibility that the style may detract from the key point of the post, but on the other hand, may also be found pleasing, or even possibly improve the readability or understanding of some other future reader, and the loyal user desires to seek the wisdom of the community to aid in this decision, and brings their concerns to meta for discussion, surely some different viewpoints will be voiced, and each contributor will have their own unique perspective on the content in question, and the user knows that they should take all of these points into consideration, and combine that input with their own judgement to strive to reach their own conclusion as to which words to preserve and which ones to strip away, but even when the best efforts have been made, and all the guidance of the community has been followed, some residue of doubt may still remain, and even when the edit is complete, the user may ask themselves if the edit was truly worthwhile, and was seen as an improvement to the post by the community, whether they really made a difference or if the post was actually a turd which should not have been polished, and these doubts are a burden for those of us who wish to edit, but we must not allow them to discourage us from our task, and we must put our best foot forward, or feet, actually, since there are more than one of us, but not feet in terms of both of the one persons feet, because you can't really put them both forward at the same time, and apply the edit with courage and confidence in the fact that our intentions are good, and that others will see that and judge us accordingly.

  • 26
    My brain is dribbling out my ears. First class effort there! – Obsidian Phoenix Apr 17 '17 at 16:38
  • 8
    I read all that. OK, yes, I'm drunk. – ThingyWotsit Apr 17 '17 at 18:24
  • 22
    I mean, I tried to make an effort to read this, but my mind locks this post out after the first few words. Suffice to say, point taken. – Makoto Apr 17 '17 at 18:44
  • 22
    Man... this is the Zalgo of meta posts..... it hurts my eyes SO much... but changing it even in the slightest takes away from its intention... Well done! I hate you... but well done! – Patrice Apr 17 '17 at 19:06
  • 18
    I've interpreted these comments to mean "My favourite answer is this one and it worked." – Don't Panic Apr 17 '17 at 19:10
  • 2
    @Don'tPanic: "Favourite" is a strong word... – Makoto Apr 17 '17 at 19:48
  • 26
    -1 This is a one sentence answer. We are specifically looking for more than one sentence. :P – Dipen Shah Apr 17 '17 at 20:02
  • 3
    my God, I never thought that it's so simple – gnat Apr 17 '17 at 20:37
  • 14
    Me: See large, unformatted block of text. Start to panic. Read the user name its posted by. "Don't Panic" it says. Brilliant. – Draco18s Apr 17 '17 at 20:51
  • 6
    It's as if Mark Twain was asked to comment on the advisability of Meta SO! – Nathan Tuggy Apr 18 '17 at 0:30
  • 9
    Well said. But could you expand a little on the point? – Jaydles Apr 18 '17 at 16:29
  • 2
    So... is your answer also advocating that other users should edit your answer for clarity? ^_^ – Justin Time Apr 18 '17 at 17:24
  • 4
    I feel like I'm reading the Preamble of the US Constitution. – Nic Hartley Apr 18 '17 at 21:02
  • 10
  • 3
    You've a long way to go before this answer's score surpasses its per-sentence word count. Let me help you out there. – John Bollinger Apr 19 '17 at 16:15
48

This is all noise. It's not adding anything useful to the posts, so yes, you can edit it out of a post.

The only exception being that portions of that first quote are giving credit to others for providing content that the answer is derived from, so that's important to keep. The half of that quote that isn't related to that is still noise though.

  • 22
    "Thanks for the pointer MetaColon but I am the master once again." I'd love to see the user's reaction when somebody edits that to just say "Thanks for the pointer MetaColon" – BoltClock Apr 18 '17 at 4:46
  • Don't get me wrong, this guy's answer would drive me crazy. But why would that not be noise as well? If a general thank you is noise to be edited, so is a specific one. – Gabe Sechan Apr 18 '17 at 20:34
  • 2
    @GabeSechan Bolt's point is that you need to make sure not to change the meaning in the process. His before/example sentence actually means something notably different. – Servy Apr 18 '17 at 20:37
  • @GabeSechan: In my editing run, I left two or three such statements largely alone, except for trimming everything around them as much as possible. The author in question clearly intended to make a distinction between others' work and their own, and that is essentially attribution. I can deplore their particular attitude, and perhaps a rewrite of some variety might be possible, but outright removal of "my answer is better" sentiments simply changes the meaning. – Nathan Tuggy Apr 18 '17 at 21:12
28

Putting aside for a moment the specific case brought here, the general question shouldn't be answered with a blanket rule. Writing flair is only a problem if it distracts from or otherwise obscures the meaning of a post. It is a fruitless endeavour to go around excising all metaphors, colourful turns of phrase and touches of personal style without making that distinction. The end goal here is clarity, and not an impersonal voice.

  • 5
    For example, this answer, is beautiful just the way it is. – Draco18s Apr 17 '17 at 20:49
  • 5
    And this question stackoverflow.com/q/2193953/73226 – Martin Smith Apr 17 '17 at 20:56
  • 2
    I would agree with you there. I certainly don't want to cut out all flair necessarily. Merely when it detracts from the question/answer. I suppose judging when is the real question, isn't it. – Obsidian Phoenix Apr 17 '17 at 22:47
  • 3
    This is the most and best balanced answer, IMO. – rene Apr 18 '17 at 5:18
  • Actually, a FAQ doesn't have voice, just answers, to questions. – Braiam Apr 20 '17 at 6:30
  • @Braiam Here is an unobjectionable definition of FAQ, taken from Wikipedia: "Frequently asked questions (FAQ) or Questions and Answers (Q&A), are listed questions and answers, all supposed to be commonly asked in some context, and pertaining to a particular topic". The definition is, with good reason, completely general; it does not specify in any way the content or the tone of the answers. – duplode Apr 20 '17 at 7:03
8

If it's noise (superfluous), remove it. The examples listed above all count as noise, so removing them is what one should do if one happens to encounter that.

2

Per general principles and the consensus here I've gone through and removed the worst of the noise. There are still some few instances where the user wished to express a distinction between their answer and some comment or answer written by another user; in such cases, it did not seem worthwhile to attempt to seriously rewrite those to cut them down slightly, nor correct to simply remove those notes entirely.

This answer can't really be edited usefully; it's nothing but a confirmation of a dupe, and should be deleted by a ♦ mod.

  • 6
    It appears that the user in question doesn't like people touching his posts. – Obsidian Phoenix Apr 18 '17 at 15:35
  • 1
    This looks like a job for Edit Ban Man! – Justin Time Apr 18 '17 at 17:28
2

And now, with indent!

A real burst of creativity there at the start - 8 levels!

Feel free to edit if you disagree with my indenting.

  • When a user, attempting to find their place as an upstanding member of this community,
  • to contribute toward the noble goal of lovingly curating
    • this vast and varied repository of knowledge we all hold so dear,
      • which has aided us in our times of need,
      • and which we endeavor to support so that
        • it continues in this capacity as an invaluable resource to countless developers,
          • working on solving any number of different problems of
            • various levels of importance to the world in general,
            • but each one personally valuable to its specific developer,
              • in that we all take pride in our work,
              • and feel the satisfaction that comes with
                • not only achieving our goals,
                • but truly understanding how the things that we have created work,
          • encounters a question or an answer which contains
            • some nugget of useful information,
            • some shining insight which guides them to better understanding, but
            • which may be obscured by an excess of additional verbiage,
    • the user must attempt in good faith to apply their efforts to grasp the true intention of the writer,
    • and to maintain that intention as they attempt to improve the question or answer,
    • and in doing so the question of style often arises,
    • and this prospective editor is confronted with the possibility
      • that the style may detract from the key point of the post,
      • but on the other hand,
        • may also be found pleasing,
        • or even possibly improve the readability or understanding of some other future reader,
    • and the loyal user
      • desires to seek the wisdom of the community to aid in this decision,
      • and brings their concerns to meta for discussion,
    • surely some different viewpoints will be voiced,
    • and each contributor will have their own unique perspective on the content in question,
    • and the user knows that they should take all of these points into consideration,
    • and combine that input with their own judgement to strive to reach their own conclusion as to which words to preserve and which ones to strip away,
    • but even when the best efforts have been made,
    • and all the guidance of the community has been followed, some residue of doubt may still remain,
    • and even when the edit is complete, the user may ask themselves
      • if the edit was truly worthwhile,
      • and was seen as an improvement to the post by the community,
      • whether they really made a difference
      • or if the post was actually a turd which should not have been polished,
    • and these doubts are a burden for those of us who wish to edit,
    • but we must not allow them to discourage us from our task,
    • and we must put our best foot forward,
      • or feet, actually, since there are more than one of us,
      • but not feet in terms of both of the one persons feet,
      • because you can't really put them both forward at the same time,
    • and apply the edit with courage and confidence in the fact that our intentions are good,
    • and that others will see that and judge us accordingly.
  • •but not feet in terms of both of the one persons feet, •because you can't really put them both forward at the same time Minor disagreement - you can hop. – FastAl Apr 18 '17 at 17:35
  • 2
    I like this. It would be interesting if we actually wrote prose this way. Sure would help me understand technical reading. – RyanZim Apr 18 '17 at 22:00
  • This looks absolutely gruesome on mobile. :( – Seth Apr 20 '17 at 14:22
-15

This answer was written in a very good mood, with a bit of sarcasm and deliberate opposite point of view. Don't worry after reading this, I'm still sane

Your flavour is not my flavor and my attitude is luckily not yours.

I would be really hesitant to edit a post that finally tries to be a bit more then Try this code. It is fine to have a clear and to the point posts but in the examples provided I don't see that much harm, I find it certainly not over the top. Maybe it can use a layout touch-up but beyond that, those are fine by my standards.

But now that we are discussing style: I do hate British English spelling, so when you start editing, please fix that as well. And please keep your hands off my posts.

  • 9
    Yes, we want answers to say more than, "try this code". But what we want them to add is information like an explanation of what the code does, how it fixes the problem, possible changes, etc. Adding, "this is the correct answer to my question and I'm adding it here so that even good and bad people can use it" before the code is no more useful than "try this code". – Servy Apr 17 '17 at 15:57
  • 3
    @Servy sure, you remove all that, and you end up with a code only answer. What do you leave? Try this code? There is no use in editing, the post will not get better. leave it alone, find something that does benefit from an edit, that makes it better. In the end you are polishing a turd, a turd with more fluff then usual, still a turd. – rene Apr 17 '17 at 16:03
  • 10
    That noise doesn't make up the entirety of the answer. Of course, even if it did, removing entire paragraphs of information improves the quality of the answer fairly dramatically, as it means a reader doesn't need to read through several paragraphs of information only to find out that there was nothing of value throughout it. If you think that the post isn't worth your time to edit, then by all means, don't edit it. That's an entirely sensible position. That doesn't mean that editing noise like this out of a post isn't an acceptable thing to be doing when editing a post. – Servy Apr 17 '17 at 16:06
  • 6
    Hey, what's wrong with British English spelling?! – DavidG Apr 18 '17 at 0:24
  • Also, would you have written a different answer if the colourful language was called "superfluous nonsense" rather than "flavour and attitude"? – DavidG Apr 18 '17 at 0:28
  • 3
    "Fixing" trans-Atlantic spelling differences is highly unwise. No one country has any claim to be the sole authority on "proper" English, so there is nothing to stop rival editors from stopping by once in a while and "fixing" it back. Since these can logically be any BrE, AmE, InE, CanE, AusE, NZE, SAE speaker, there wouldn't even really be an edit war as such. (Perhaps this was intended to be sarcasm, but if so it seems to have gone wide of the mark.) – Nathan Tuggy Apr 18 '17 at 0:29
  • Are you seriously comparing the overwhelming amounts of salt in the examples listed above to "Try this code"? "Try this code" isn't even trying - the examples above on the other hand are trying really, really hard to make some sort of emotional point. This has nothing to do with writing style, or the dialect of English used. – BoltClock Apr 18 '17 at 4:41
  • 1
    @DavidG your assumption about me writing a different answer when the question was worded differently is spot on. Glad someone noticed. I knew I could count on you ... thx. – rene Apr 18 '17 at 5:13
  • 1
    @BoltClock I see it as style thing but I can and do understand others see that differently. Fair enough. – rene Apr 18 '17 at 5:16
  • 1
    @NathanTuggy I didn't know there were established sarcasm marks and I might or might not keep that in mind in writing my next answer. I doubt it will have effect on my flavor and attitude. – rene Apr 18 '17 at 5:24
  • @rene: I meant the idiom "wide of the mark", like an arrow that flies wide of its target — that is, your post's tone was somewhat misaimed, and failed to hit its target of conveying sarcasm sufficiently well. (There is a sarcasm mark, but it's not real common, and it's not what I was referring to.) – Nathan Tuggy Apr 18 '17 at 5:35
  • 1
    If it misses the mark depends on what you're aiming for. For me it is spot on. You simply have different standards. Again, I might or might not keep that in mind for my next post, if any @NathanTuggy – rene Apr 18 '17 at 5:37
  • 1
    @rene: Sure, if the target you aimed for was miscommunication. You are of course free to deliberately compose posts with an eye toward quietly laughing at all the foolish readers who misunderestimate you. But this isn't the way to win friends/rep/arguments and influence people. – Nathan Tuggy Apr 18 '17 at 5:45
  • @NathanTuggy it needs two to tango ... but yes, I didn't have high hopes that this answer would become my finest hour. I keep that for later, much later I'm afraid. – rene Apr 18 '17 at 5:49
  • 1
    @Rene: Leave your hands off my posts. If you go converting behaviour to the obnoxious Webster-inspired alternative 'behavior' in my posts, I shall mercilessly roll back your edits. My style is mine; it uses British spelling consciously and deliberately and in defiance of squiggly red lines from browsers. I don't change other people's Americanized spellings to British; you (and your cohorts) should leave British spellings unchanged by people who speak and write British English. I have doubts about whether the Indian English use of 'doubt' to mean 'question' should be changed. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 18 '17 at 23:13
-20

If it really sucks, fix it. If there are paragraphs of useless off topic tripe, remove them.

But it's a free country, and granting people latitude is a good thing. The less this site matches that 'restrained' freedom, the weaker it gets (and the more the talented people go back to competing sites).

Restricting 'to the T' is power-hungry dictatorship. And touching posts needlessly pisses people off. If that's your bag, go for it. But I'd love to see you face the writers in person!

  • 1
    hmmmm... I feel like this site was built & designed, and that the rules for it were decided to NOT have "unrestrained freedom".... so..... yeah, edit out any noise, as you are supposed to do. – Patrice Apr 17 '17 at 19:39
  • 2
    Just to really sink your ship, Stack Overflow is used in countries one may not consider "free". Overall though, I think your answer dramatically misses the point. – Makoto Apr 17 '17 at 19:49
  • So sad... stackoverflow started so good... nothing golden stays, really! – FastAl Apr 17 '17 at 20:04
  • 8
    @FastAl Editing content to improve it was one of the founding values of the site. It's been a core feature of the site since before it even existed. It's not something new. – Servy Apr 17 '17 at 20:24
  • 2
    People who get "p***ed off" by edits on their posts need to learn that it's not personal though. Not doing something because someone is offended by the values of the site is not a reason to not do it. – DavidG Apr 18 '17 at 0:35
  • 3
    SO has had a policy of editing out noise like this for almost eight years. – Nathan Tuggy Apr 18 '17 at 0:47
  • @makoto - At least you're not the dude who said 'don't use British English' ;-) – FastAl Apr 18 '17 at 17:27
  • I am hoping this makes the featured questions ... Currently the negative score on this is one of the lowest I've seen and I wasn't even trying! – FastAl Apr 18 '17 at 17:29

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