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Why are some "differences in" questions are open and some are closed?

Is there a criteria as to what questions requesting "differences" between tech/libraries/frameworks are acceptable questions and what are not?

Open Questions:

Closed Questions:

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  • Whenever or not we have actually got to handle these questions... remember, we get ~8k questions/day, it's impossible to catch everything. – Braiam Apr 13 '17 at 19:57
  • How do you mean? i.e. How would you handle the one about "PECL and PEAR", and how would you handle the one about "Zend Framework and Django"? – Dennis Apr 13 '17 at 19:59
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    @Dennis All of the questions you've listed are Too Broad. – Servy Apr 13 '17 at 20:00
  • You might want to add What is the difference between glu glew glut qt sdl opengl and webgl which is an example for an (in my opinion) good difference question (and it's from 2013). I actually saw a lot of people linking to this question in comments when other questions confuse these things. – BDL Apr 13 '17 at 20:05
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Why are some "differences in" questions are open and some are closed?

Because there are so many close worthy questions posted, and comparably few people who are willing and able to take the time to close those questions, so as a result, many questions that merit closure end up not getting closed.

Is there a criteria as to what questions requesting "differences" between tech/libraries/frameworks are acceptable questions and what are not?

Pretty much any such question is going to be "too broad".

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Age is a big factor. Two of the open questions you list are from 2009 and the third is from 2011. Back then we (as in the community) hadn't realised that these sort of questions were poor quality and would lead to poor quality answers. Don't let the votes fool you, these questions are always popular, but they're not a good fit for Stack Overflow.

Views (or lack thereof) is a second factor. The first question you linked to has only 170 views despite being asked over a year ago, so it hasn't had the exposure needed to get sufficient close votes.

What people really want from these questions is whether they should use X or Y for their next project. However, that question is almost always unanswerable. We'd need to know the skill/experience levels of the participants, the timescales of the project etc. In the vast majority of cases they should use technology that they and their team are familiar with.

What they should really be doing is do a "spike" (in Agile terms) of a small aspect of their project in one (or even both) of the things they're comparing and see how they fare. They can then come to ask specific questions about things that didn't go right and see if there's a solution or not.

Now that you've brought these questions to the attention of the community there's a very good chance they'll be closed quite quickly. In fact I've closed the first one as a duplicate of the question linked to in it's "answer".

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  • thanks. What do you mean about poor quality in this case? I could argue that given enough time and expertise, such a question can receive an answer with amazing research and quality. Do you mean that most answers tend to lack such expertise? – Dennis Apr 13 '17 at 20:07
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    @Dennis yes, they tend to degenerate into people just listing their favourite features or even, in really bad cases, denigrating one side or the other. – ChrisF Apr 13 '17 at 20:09

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