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This question is put on hold almost as soon as it has been asked. A member asked the OP to share his code. The OP promised to do so.

So is it good to hurry to close a question or not?

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  • IMHO, the problem here is that someone took the time to write a comment instead of voting to close and moving on. – user247702 Apr 13 '17 at 14:10
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    Well... If the OP rushes to ask his question so much he doesn't show code.... I would say yes, we should rush to close. – Patrice Apr 13 '17 at 14:17
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    The quicker the better really as it stops people answering such questions and encouraging this kind of behaviour. – Bugs Apr 13 '17 at 14:25
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    the problem is that 14 hours later, even if the OP added his code right away after someone explained asked him that, that post is still closed. – Billal BEGUERADJ Apr 14 '17 at 5:10
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    The OP promised to do so. But sometimes they say this but don't actually do it, especially if someone answers anyway. – BSMP Apr 25 '17 at 15:11
  • That is the only convincing thing I ever heard related to this. Thank you very much for the insightful feedback. @BSMP – Billal BEGUERADJ Apr 25 '17 at 15:18
37

Yes, it is good to rush to close questions. I've said it many times, people have all the time in the world to write a good question before they post it. We don't need to give them more time to edit it into shape afterwards. Much of the time, they're not going to. Getting the question closed immediately tells the OP what they need to do to get the question into shape to be reopened.

In this particular case, the question was closed a minute before the OP commented that they'd post their code, so there was really no way for the community to know that they were about to edit code into the question.

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33

A member asked the OP to share his code. The OP promised to do so.

Here's what I don't understand: why can't people just share their code at the time they first post their questions if they're going to do so? Why do we have to keep prompting people to do that after the fact, and pray that they will follow up afterward?

Closing a question quickly is meant to encourage askers to not wait to be prompted to share their code, so we don't have to do the whole closing song and dance in the first place. If we prompt them and they don't follow up, their questions are going to get closed anyway. So why wait?

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  • Here's what I don't understand: why can't people just share their code at the time they first post their questions if they're going to do so? I think it is because new or non experienced users, even when they are very good programmers, do not know necessarily how to ask; and thus they need to be guided through comments instead of being punished right after asking. – Billal BEGUERADJ Apr 13 '17 at 14:35
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    @BillalBEGUERADJ Which is of course why there is lots of information on how to ask an acceptable question, information which is presented to those users before they can ask their first question. In fact, they need to confirm that they've read the guidelines before they're allowed to ask their first question. So they don't have ignorance as an excuse. They actively choose to ignore the guidance they were given. That and closing a bad question is the appropriate way to guide the author into fixing it. – Servy Apr 13 '17 at 14:37
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    'I think it is because new or non experienced users, even when they are very good programmers, do not know necessarily how to ask' - well, how many of those users whould phone their doctor and say 'I'm sick, but I can't be bothered to come in to your practice for a physical exam - please fix me'. – ThingyWotsit Apr 13 '17 at 15:02
  • There are questions which do not code sharing. Anyway, in our case, the OP's question stayed closed 14 hours after he added the code right away after someone asked him. The OP was collaborative with the community which has to be patient. Within 14 hours, one could resolve his own problem. Lot of people quit StackOverflow because of the rush and negative behaviors. @ThingyWotsit – Billal BEGUERADJ Apr 15 '17 at 8:02
  • @BillalBEGUERADJ: A question that can be self-solved in 14 hours wall-clock time is, perhaps, not worth recording on SO in the first place. Leaving the question open when it can't be answered correctly isn't the way to get lasting value, and that's SO's fundamental value proposition. – Nathan Tuggy Apr 16 '17 at 12:41
  • @Nathan Tuggy: Useful self-answered questions based on problems that were solved within 14 minutes aren't unheard of. Although I suppose that does depend on the skill level of the programmer, too. – BoltClock Apr 16 '17 at 13:06

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