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In an effort to have an accepted answer in each of my questions, I went back to an old question that I had asked and where I only got one answer, which was not really helpful as the answerer's english was hard to understand. Later I was able to find the cause of the error and fix it, but forgot to provide an answer to my question with the solution, and now I don't remember exactly how I solved the problem, but I have a general idea...

What should I do in this case?

  1. Accept the only answer, even though it wasn't really helpful, and write a comment about what was wrong? (I don't really see the point behind this)

  2. Answer my own question with a general idea about what was the reason behind the error and accept it?

  3. Leave the question unanswered?

  • 25
    4. Try to remember what your solution was, but give up and get yourself a cup of coffee. – zondo Apr 11 '17 at 0:36
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    you could write an answer and not accept it. In this way there is still motivation for others to write a better answer while someone looking for an answer will have at least your answer to start with – formerlyknownas_463035818 Apr 12 '17 at 9:47
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    5. Recreate the problem so you can solve it again and write a full answer (The problem is reproducible, isn't it?) – jwodder Apr 13 '17 at 16:38
  • @jwodder I guess, with enough time and motivation, I could reproduce the problem. – Namefie Apr 13 '17 at 18:18
  • @tobi303 That's what I'll do in case I don't manage to write a sufficiently useful answer. – Namefie Apr 13 '17 at 18:21
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Please don't accept an unhelpful answer.

If you feel you can leave an answer that may be helpful to other users, please do.

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    Yes. A "general idea" answer is more useful that no answer at all. And in case somebody provides a more comprehensive, step by step answer in the future, you can always un-accept your answer and accept theirs. – AJPerez Apr 11 '17 at 6:14
  • Right! Thanks to you both :) – Namefie Apr 11 '17 at 6:47
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    And you can always update your answer later with more details, should they come back to you (which may happen already when you start writing). – GolezTrol Apr 12 '17 at 9:46

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