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Yesterday I was doing some reviewing. I am aware of audits, which are tests to check if the user pays attention or not. I was given this audit and asked if it should be closed or not. I'm not sure what the original reason for closing (which was not duplicate) was, but there was a comment (first comment) by the user who asked the question:

New updated question here

So I visited the link and it was the same question with slight modifications. Then I voted for Close as duplicate and system responded with

This was a test, you didn't pass etc.

I can't understand what I did wrong. Why did I fail this audit?

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    "Is there a flaw in audits" - yes, more than one. Rest assured you didn't fail the audit, the audit failed you. – Siguza Apr 8 '17 at 20:29
  • Audits are a flawed system whose only redeeming characteristic is that they are better than the other easily realizable alternatives. – Stephen Rauch Apr 10 '17 at 5:19
  • Possible solution: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/272472/… – Tot Zam Apr 10 '17 at 13:41
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Yes, audits are flawed in many ways. Everybody fails them occasionally, unless they cheat (which is easy - but still more effort than people who don't pay attention at all are willing to spend).

But! They still serve their purpose. They don't exist to prevent improper reviewing, just to keep it to a manageable level.

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    Some of us never fail them, because some of us got so irritated by this stupid system years ago that we stopped doing audits. This is a case in point. – user207421 Apr 9 '17 at 4:23
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    @EJP Unless you meant "stopped doing reviews", I'm not sure how you can not do audits. – Mr Lister Apr 9 '17 at 7:56
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    @MrLister (I think that's the joke.) – Dragomok Apr 9 '17 at 15:12
  • @Dragomok (How was I to know...) – Mr Lister Apr 9 '17 at 15:49
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    It's not that difficult to avoid audits with a script. Last I checked, whether or not the review is an audit is sent to the client-side, and available through the API (or, at the very least, through the internal, undocumented API that Stack Overflow uses to load reviews). It's a one-time effort, and you can robo-review to your heart's content. Failing that, audits are displayed with 0 score, but you can load the actual question, and it'll show you the real score. – Nic Hartley Apr 10 '17 at 3:33
  • "I'm not sure how you can not do audits" By skipping them. Audits are easy to detect, so one can just skip them. – Tom Apr 10 '17 at 11:45
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Speaking in general:

You failed because the question was being used as a known good question. A known good question is one with no close votes, down votes, and has a score of 5 or more. So since it was a known good question the correct choices are leave open or skip. Trying to close a known good question with any reason is a fail.

Duplicates are a little painful with the review queues. In triage you can fail an audit by trying to close a question as a dupe just like in the close vote queue. The problem is that a question can be well received and well written but still be a dupe. The audit system should ignores these as just because no one else saw/found a dupe does not mean the question is not one.

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    It is now such a good one, at the time it has already close vote (I was there for review the close vote). I don't remember down-votes but surely there were not considerable up-votes. – Xaqron Apr 8 '17 at 21:23
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    @Xaqron The system creates fake close votes when doing an audit. Those close votes don't count and aren't real, but it makes it look like it is to see whether you will just believe other people (robo-review) or actually review the question. – wizzwizz4 Apr 9 '17 at 8:08
  • It system adds fake close-votes and maybe down-votes (at least there are not considerable up-votes since you review a question in early stages after publishing) then known good question is not meaningful at that early stage. – Xaqron Apr 9 '17 at 12:45
  • @Xaqron the point of audits is kind of where the system becomes inherently broken. They are not designed to be good audits in the traditional sense of what an audit is checking for. They are really just a system-run 'captcha' that messes up otherwise good questions (sometimes) to make them look bad, or vice versa, to make attentive reviewers (which should be everyone) say "wait a minute, what's going on with this?". The dev team's reasoning is, if it makes you stop, check in a new tab, etc., then it has made you pay attention and therefore has done its job. – TylerH Apr 10 '17 at 2:51
  • A true review audit system would be users (or an automated system) checking reviews that were split, or positive reviews of a negative question, or negative reviews of a positive question. – TylerH Apr 10 '17 at 2:52

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