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I just saw the question SQL error: #1271 - Illegal mix of collations for operation 'UNION' bumped to the home page by the Community User. I looked at the revision history and it has been bumped 11 (eleven) times — once a month between June 2016 and April 2017 — with little obvious effect.

Why is this question so important to the Community User that it deserves this many attempts to gain attention? Shouldn't the Community User accept that there is no interest in the question?

The OP could post their solution as a self-answer and accept it; that might improve things and stop the bumping. But there's little incentive for anyone else to do a thing about it. Creating a Community Wiki answer doesn't mean anybody would notice or that it would be accepted. (The OP is still around; they were seen yesterday, so not all hope is lost.)


Although Bumped by Community User has useful information in Stijn's answer, and it does explain the general mechanics of the Community User bumping questions, it doesn't completely explain why this particular question got select once a month for 11 months, more or less like clockwork.

As I noted in a comment below, I'm surprised that there aren't a lot of other questions eligible for bumping. If only one question an hour gets this treatment, in 30 days * 24 hours there are 720 questions bumped. It is surprising to me that any question gets bumped on a monthly basis — I would expect the pool of candidates to be much bigger. There are over 13M questions asked on SO. If I were very optimistic, I might guess that 0.01% of those might be eligible for bumping; that's a pool of 1300 questions … maybe it isn't so odd if my percentage is right. I suspect that the percentage of eligible questions is an order or two of magnitude large, so it is more surprising that this particular question was selected routinely. There are other as yet undocumented factors at play here.

This question is now unlikely to be rebumped; the one answer has a couple of up-votes, which should stop it being eligible for bumping.

But the questions remain:

  • How big is the pool of candidate questions?
  • What are the other criteria that control the order in which the bumped questions are chosen?
  • Was there something unusual about this question that meant it got the 'routine bump' treatment?
  • How many other questions get similar 'routine bumping' treatment?

Other example 'monthly bumper' questions

I've just come across another 'monthly bumper' question:

This has been bumped monthly since June 2016, for a total of 11 times. This example was found by Hans Passant and noted in his comment below.

SEDE Query - Bumped by Community User (more than 5 times)

The questions identified above are not an isolated phenomenon. I've created a SEDE (Stack Exchange Data Explorer) query with the title Bumped by Community User (more than 5 times). The results list over 2700 questions that have been bumped more than five times by the Community User.

For a given ID number, such as 1069184, you can link to the revision history using:

The filter should, perhaps, be enhanced to eliminate those questions that would not be selected any more. But it gives a first pass answer at some of my questions.

Another SEDE query, Number of Questions Bumped N Times by Community User gives the number of questions bumped 2, 3, … 12 times. At the moment, that yields:

Times Bumped     Number of Questions
3                313
4                276
5                299
6                207
7                193
8                179
9                171
10               379
11              1606
12                32

The other query doesn't show counts of 3, 4, 5. However, it is fairly clear that one of the comments from Stijn's answer (see above) is not wholly accurate. The list above shows 3,623 questions bumped 3 or more times.

The Community User will only bump a maximum of one question per hour.

There are many more questions bumped than that rate suggests. Either the bumping didn't start in May 2016, or there is another factor (such as principal tag) involved in deciding which questions are bumped.

You can also look at SEDE queries:

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    "The OP could post their solution as a self-answer and accept it" Yeah, if it had occurred to them, somehow. – BoltClock Apr 7 '17 at 4:52
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    Do you have any insight into why this question has been selected so routinely? Is it the number of views? The question only has one undeleted answer (and two deleted ones). The answer now has an up-vote; it didn't before. I'm just puzzled that it isn't left to wither like a normal question with limited interest to the SO populace. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 7 '17 at 5:22
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    Nope, I don't know how the selection works. – BoltClock Apr 7 '17 at 5:28
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    Fascinating.... – Travis J Apr 7 '17 at 6:51
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    Well you may have hit the nail on the head, the OP is still active. The CU might just be bumping this to get someone to comment to the OP to get it done ;) – Gimby Apr 7 '17 at 8:05
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    Possible duplicate of Bumped by Community User?. @JonathanLeffler see Stijn's answer – Veve Apr 7 '17 at 13:07
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    @Veve that explains the general principle; this is a special case which might or might not be a bug. I'm voting to leave it open (for now). – Glorfindel Apr 7 '17 at 13:35
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    @Glorfindel Jonathan said that the only undeleted answer score was 0 until now, and bumped once a month ("at least 30 days without activity"). I might be wrong but I don't see how it's a special case, except the fact it has been chosen so many times. – Veve Apr 7 '17 at 17:39
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    @Veve exactly. It's not normal for a question to be bumped so often, even if the bumping itself is according to the rules. It's like winning the lottery five times in a row; it's possible, but there's a chance something is wrong. – Glorfindel Apr 7 '17 at 17:45
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    @Veve: I agree that the criteria seem to be met — it's why I've not contested the duplicate. I'd still like to understand how this question gets to be at the top of the pile so regularly. I'm surprised that there aren't a lot of other questions eligible, and if only one question an hour gets this treatment, in 30 days * 24 hours there are 720 questions bumped. It is surprising to me that any question gets bumped on a monthly basis — I would expect the pool of candidates to be much bigger (say 0.01% of the 13M questions might be eligible; that's still a pool of 1300; … maybe it isn't so odd). – Jonathan Leffler Apr 7 '17 at 17:47
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    Also, now the one undeleted answer has an up-vote, the question is no longer eligible for bumping according to that algorithm. But I am still curious about what led to it being selected so routinely. How big is the pool of candidate questions? What are the other criteria that control the order in which the bumped questions are chosen? – Jonathan Leffler Apr 7 '17 at 17:50
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    The natural conclusion here is that the Community User has achieved sentience. – Travis J Apr 7 '17 at 18:39
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    The Community user bumps this question at around the same datetime each month. I'm guessing a developer used this as a test for something and forgot to turn it off. – TylerH Apr 7 '17 at 20:57
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    @Glorfindel Nothing to See Here: People Who Sell Lottery Tickets Are Just Really Lucky: "It is important to note that frequent wins by individuals, including lottery agents, do not definitively mean improper activity has occurred,” a D.C. Lottery spokesperson told WUSA. – Jeffrey Bosboom Apr 9 '17 at 3:16
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    Here is another one. Looks like this bug (SQL error?) was introduced late May 2016. – Hans Passant Apr 9 '17 at 9:33
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OK, I've added a change here so that the community user can't rebump a question unless the original bump is more than 90 days in the past.

The problem here was caused back in 2011 when the bumps were weighted a little more towards questions that had been already been viewed. The outcome all this time later was that more bumps got more views got more bumps got more views and so forth.

After this build goes out in a few there should be a lot more variety to what gets bumped.

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    Thank you. I'll look into what happens in the future — maybe 60 days or so into the future, when the 'more than 30 days' part of the rule has had a chance to take effect. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 8 at 17:42

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